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What now? Dolphins should learn a lesson

We could use this space to discuss why the Dolphins folded like a cheap lawn chair against the Saints Sunday after building a 24-3 lead. We could discuss why the Saints were able to tie the record for the greatest comeback in franchise history, outscoring Miami 36-10 in the second half and 22-0 in the fourth quarter.

I can tell you Tony Sparano and his coaching staff blew that time out situation just prior to halftime -- allowing Saints coach Sean Payton to change his mind about kicking the field goal his team was already lined up for and get a momentum-swinging TD instead.

I can tell you Ted Ginn Jr. once again proved he's not ready for prime time -- as he turned a catchable pass in his hands into a bobble that got plucked out of the air by a defender and eventually returned for a TD. I can tell you Ginn later dropped another pass in a crucial fourth-quarter situation.

I can tell you Anthony Fasano continues to be the incredible shrinking tight end -- turning what was a fine season in 2008 into a distant memory in 2009 as he regresses with dropped passes or fumbles.

I can tell you Gibril Wilson continues to struggle.

I can tell you offensive coordinator Dan Henning must have blown a mental gasket, calling 20 run plays in the first half in helping the Dolphins take a 24-10 lead, but calling only eight more runs in the second half as the Dolphins watched their lead evaporate in the hot evening air.

All those are reasons the Dolphins blew it Sunday, and if you want the graphic details click here to see why this team continues to lay Ostrich-sized eggs against good teams.

But let me quote a wise Dolphins receiver here:

"Every time you lose there's a lesson to be learned," said Dolphins receiver Greg Camarillo. "Every time you win there's a lesson. There are lessons to be had. We'll look at the film and we have to learn the lessons. We've lost too many games. If you do't learn the lessons now, you keep losing games."

So what are the lessons we've learned from this season's 2-4 start?

Let me start with the receivers. Guys, it is time to bench Ted Ginn Jr. I'm not saying cut the kid. I'm not saying punish him in any way. It's not his fault he's not up to answering the call most of the time as he drops key passes, or plays scared, or fails to make plays any good receiver would make.

I'm saying the experiment needs to end.

He needs to stop getting snaps in key, pressure situations. By benching, I'm not saying he should lose his starting job. I'm saying he needs to lose snaps. I don't care if he's in on the first play or not. I care that he's not there for the important plays.

Brian Hartline is today already a more productive receiver. Think about it. Ginn had eight passes thrown his way Sunday. He caught two for 16 yards. Hartline had five passes thrown to him. He caught three for 94 yards. Ginn is faster. But Hartline is better. Give the better receiver more plays and let the faster receiver go return kicks or something.

Or here's another idea: How about you make Ginn inactive and play Patrick Turner, too? I don't know exactly the reason Turner hasn't been able to earn playing time. He's been inactive every game. But each of those games Turner sat out, with the exception of the Jets game, Ginn has proven he is not the future for this franchise.

Turner might be in the future.

I say the Dolphins should get about the business of finding out if Turner is part of the future. Bench Ginn. Play Hartline and activate Turner and get him some snaps. They can't be worse than Ginn. Learn the lesson!

The Dolphins obviously made a mistake on Wilson in free agency. I predict that, barring a swift turnaround from his current course, he will not be with the team next season. The guy is always a step slow in coverage and does not tackle well. How's that for a great combination?

His attempted tackle of Jeremy Shockey on that 66-yard gain Sunday was a clinic on how not to do it. Afterward Wilson talked about how "Shock is a great player. It was Shock being Shock."

Well, why haven't Miami coaches tired of Wilson being Wilson?

Tyrone Culver seems better to me. And, with Chris Clemons active for the first time this season on Sunday, the hope and expectation is that he is on the come. So try Clemons also, if you must. The point is, Wilson has had six games to resolve his myriad issues.

He has not done it.

Instead he has shown why the Giants let him go in free agency and then the Raiders cut him one year after they signed him. The Dolphins made a mistake on Wilson and that mistake was multiplied several times when one considers the team did not re-sign Renaldo Hill, did not sign Darren Sharper -- you know, the dude that had a 42-yard interception return touchdown -- and did not sign Brian Dawkins as free agents.

So the Miami personnel department bypassed three better players in order to get Wilson.

The Miami personnel department is smart in that it quickly cuts ties with players that fail -- eliminating mistakes rather than nurturing them. The Miami coaching staff needs to follow suit and eliminate players such as Ginn and Wilson from the lineup so that the same sad story doesn't continue to read the same sad way in game after game after game.

That would be a good lesson to learn.

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