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Reggie Bush is about more than statistics

If you are a pure stats geek, you're not too impressed by Reggie Bush as an NFL player. You're not too fired up by the Dolphins nailing down the acquisition of Bush this morning.

He's a 4.0-yard per carry running back. Any season he's carried the ball more than 100 times, his average has dropped to 3.7 yards per rush. He only scored one TD last season. He's never averaged over 10 yards per catch. His most explosive running play last season was a 23-yard run. His most explosive reception last season went for 20 yards.

And all those number, dear stat geek, misses the football point.

Reggie Bush is a defensive coordinator's nightmare. Period.

Anytime he comes onto the field, the defense must account for him. Adding him means the Miami offense has doubled the number of players the defense must account for from one a year ago -- Brandon Marshall -- to two this coming year.

Bush is also a matchup pain in the posterior for defenders. How many linebackers can actually run with this guy? That would be maybe ... a handful? So many times use either a safety or a nickel cornerback to cover Bush.

But here's the problem: What does the defense do when the offense isn't in its pass personnel package? That means the defense has to play with base personnel and that means, either you're praying your linebacker suddenly runs like he swallowed a dozen Red Bulls or you're using a DB on the kid, which is just crazy as matchups go.

In a nutshell, Bush in the game means the offense is now dictating to the defense instead of the other way around. When was the last time a Miami offense was able to do that? It's been a while.

And that makes Bush more valuable than just the mere statistics he posts.

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