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31 posts from February 2013

February 14, 2013

Dolphins history with free agency? Not great

I did an impromptu live chat on twitter today during lunch. If you are not following me, please do so now to add to your Dolphins fan experience.

Anyway, during the chat someone asked me my opinion of the best unrestricted free agent the Dolphins ever signed.

So I went to my trusty media guide and looked at the names through the years starting in 1992 and was honestly saddened by how few truly impactful players this team has signed in free agency.

Now, there have been some good ones. There have been guys signed that started for several years. But great additions?


Far between.

Before running through the names, let me identify what an unrestricted free agent is. We're not counting street free agents because that's another category altogether. Cameron Wake would be classified as a street free agent because he was in the CFL and then made his services available to all NFL teams.

We're also not counting undrafted rookie free agents. Those are another classification separate from unrestricted veteran free agents.

I'm talking about players whose contracts expired with their NFL teams and now are free to shop their services with the remaining teams around the league -- a system that started in earnest in 1992.

Oddly, Miami's first dive into free agency was among its best. Tight end Keith Jackson signed in '92 and was a good player. But his time with Miami lasted a mere 42 games. Three seasons from October of 1992 through the '94 season made Jackson stay all too short. By the end of '94 he was talking about retiring and so Don Shula traded him in the offseason to Green Bay.

Granted, Jackson was better than any tight end Miami has had since that time. But his best season came in 1994 when he caught 59 passes for 673 yards and seven touchdowns. So he was very good, but his Miami time was shortlived.

He was replaced by another free agent tight end signing. Remember Eric Green? Yeah, terrible. He lasted one season in which he missed 39 practices. Yikes.

Keith Byars was solid, but again, he only lasted three full seasons.

Gene Atkins was a nightmare, Fred Barnett was a bust, as was Charles Jordan. Other WR busts in free agency? James McKnight, Derrius Thompson, Az-Zahir Hakeem (aka Az Hakeem), and Legedu Naanee.

Now, some good players did arrive. Don't think I'm saying free agency has been worthless.

Brock Marion and Kevin Donnalley were the only two signed in 1998 by Jimmy Johnson and both started and played well for a few years. Rich Owens came as an afterthought of sorts in 1999 and led the team with 8.5 sacks that year before falling off the map.

Jay Fiedler was a hard-nosed, hard-working, smart quarterback. But he was a game-manager. Can't say he was a bad addition. But you can't say he was the answer.

The 2008 free agent class brought Randy Starks and he's been excellent. But that class also included busts Keith Davis, Sean Ryan, Chris Crocker, and Justin Smiley. A pause here: I know many of you will say Smiley was not a bust. You'll contend he simply got hurt.

Well, the facts are Smiley signed a five-year contract and lasted only two. And he finished both those years on injured reserve. And he came to the Dolphins with an injury history and that history got longer in Miami. And I remind you, as I always do, that durability is a key critical factor in judging players.

So the Dolphins didn't get the length of years or durability they wanted out of Smiley. He didn't solve their problems for the time they expected. And the shoulder that was a problem in San Francisco was not surprisingly a problem in Miami.

Meanwhile, Jake Grove came in 2009. Same issue. Same result. Came with injury history from Oakland. Everyone pointed it out. Dolphins said it wasn't an issue. It became an issue.

Karlos Dansby and Richie Incognito came in 2010. Both good starters. Good job.

Kevin Burnett came in 2011. Another good starter signed for much cheaper than what Dansby got yet plays at about the same level. Very good job.

Then 2012 was worthless. Gary Guyton. Cut. Artis Hicks, Cut. Tyrell Jackson. Cut. Richard Marshall. Injured. Naanee. Cut. Jamal Westerman. Cut.

I can see why many of you are leery of free agency. I can see why many doubt this front office's ability to significantly improve the team in free agency. But ...

I remind you the players the club signed last year were basically stopgaps. None were expensive. So the Dolphins basically got what they paid for -- not much.

If the club dives into free agency this offseason, It'll be going into the deep end. That means Miami will be trying to add legitimate playmakers such as Mike Wallace. He won't be cheap. But his price won't be, either.

What happens as far as landing him or not? Well, the club's history for getting the player it really wants needs a reversal. The Dolphins really wanted Peyton Manning. Didn't get him. The club wanted Ryan Clark. Didn't get him.

I'm told the Dolphins will try to land Wallace.

We'll see.


Sean Smith worth $10.7 million guaranteed for one year?

I don't want to beat a dead horse here but the idea of the Dolphins using a franchise tag on Sean Smith got new life recently when CBSSports.com either reported or suggested the Dolphins were preparing to do exactly that this offseason.

The Palm Beach Post did the same in January.

I have been told it will not happen by a well-placed team source, who even mocked the suggestion to my face.

We'll see who's right.

But aside from being told it's not happening I like my chances because we're starting to see exactly what placing a franchise tag on Smith, or any cormerback for that matter, will cost. NFL.com's Albert Breer did excellent work Wednesday uncovering projections for the 2013 franchise tag numbers.

The report sates that cornerback franchise tags are expected to be the third most expensive behind only quarterback and defensive end projections. And that cornerback number is projected at a whopping $10.7 million.






For one year.

Believe whatever you wish about Sean Smith. I already shared with you my take on his ability and future prospects relative to a new contract. But is there any one of you that believes paying Smith $10.7 million guaranteed in 2013 is a good deal for the Dolphins?


(Not counting you, agent David Canter. I know you think that he's worth that much. I'm speaking to unbiased people, here.)

There is simply no way that is a good transaction for the Dolphins spending nearly one-quarter of the salary cap space the front office has worked diligently to accumulate over time on a player who is a starter, yes, but a playmaker and difference maker? No.

Franchise numbers are meant to keep top tier talent from fleeing smaller market teams for bigger market teams. It protects teams against losing the best and brightest on its roster, at least for a year or two. Players don't love the tag because it prevents them from going onto the free agent market and getting what is typically a bigger chunk of guaranteed money, albeit for more years of service.

But the problem with administering the franchise tag is it all counts toward the cap in one large Brink's truck delivery. All of it. It is a salary cap gobbler. It is a 12-cylinder engine at the gas pump. It is that Asian guy at the annual Nathan's Hot Dog eating contest. It is Salguero at a buffet.

It consumes!

That makes it unwise to use for a team trying to maximize its cap space. And it makes it borderline personnel department malpractice to use on a player whose level of play does not suggest he should be paid among the top 10 players at his position.

Is Sean Smith a top 10 cornerback in the NFL?

Maybe that other newspaper and the website think so. I don't. I've been told the Dolphins don't think so either.

What do you think?

By the way, if I'm wrong and the club does use the franchise tag on Smith, it would have repercussions. Do that, rather than signing him to a long-term deal if he's in their plans, would mean the cap hit. And that would mean less flexibility in free agency. And that would mean less talent coming to the team.

Thankfully, I'm not wrong.

February 13, 2013

Fans and media sometimes react faster than FOs

The most asked questions I'm getting on twitter lately are 1. When will the Dolphins new logo be announced and 2. Will the Dolphins be interested in trading for Percy Harvin?

Well, we know the answer to one of those questions.

The Dolphins have said they will unveil their new logo in April.

As to the second? I don't know. And the Dolphins probably don't know. And that is the point of this post.

The truth is that my years of covering the Dolphins and NFL have taught me that fans and media often move a whole lot faster on things than many NFL teams. And some NFL teams move even slower than others to the pace of, well, a snail.

So let's just say the Dolphins don't move super fast.

Only recently I shared with you the fact that while one side of the organization had already approved letting the stadium modernization plan go to a county referendum, there had been no discussion internally with the football side about what it might do to help matters by being more aggressive in free agency or trades. I don't know if that conversation has since happened. I don't know if it will happen. But I know that an organization that reacts quickly to things would have had the talk as part of the decision to take the issue to voters.

Let me share something else.

Last year, as Mike Wallace was holding out in Pittsburgh and the discussion here, on fan boards, on talk radio and on twitter was about whether the Steelers would possibly trade Wallace, I asked one Dolphins personnel official about the possibility.

"I don't know that he's even available," he told me.

It wasn't ignorance. It was just that this person expects to find out something from the source before not only acting but even thinking about the topic. Fans have the luxury of speculating, of dreaming out loud even.

Many personnel guys don't afford themselves that luxury. They act on facts. Thus they wait for those facts to become reality before considering them.

Another example?

Last year the Dolphins were among the first teams to work out Braylon Edwards. The team liked him. The team considered signing him. But as that consideration was happening, the Seattle Seahawks brought the guy in and signed him.

Now, the thoughtful approach ultimately worked for the Dolphins. Edwards was not a big factor for anyone in 2012. But the point I'm making is the Dolphins didn't really move fast on the issue.

They are systematic, it seems to me.

I was told (true or not) that I actually wrote about the Vontae Davis trade possibility to Indianapolis before the Dolphins started giving it strong consideration and the thing heated up. That's one reason, I was told, the possibility of such a deal was initially denied by the team. Apparently the media and fans were speculating on the idea before it became a serious negotiation.

It's not just the Dolphins and it's not just this organizational set of people. Dave Wannstedt's organization was slow. Don Shula's was extremely fast and aggressive.

So there are different reaction times for different front offices.

And that brings me to Harvin. I don't know this for a fact, but I would not be surprised if he hasn't been discussed yet by the Dolphins based on their recent history. If and when he actually is put on the trade market, I suppose the club will consider its options.

But with the combine, their own player signings and unrestricted free agency looming, I'm not betting that Miami personnel people are sitting around mulling Percy Harvin trade scenarios these days. That's not a bad thing. Indeed, if that's what the front office is doing, then something is amiss.

No, unless I miss my guess, there will be a systematic, calculated, slow approach to the idea of a Percy Harvin trade. And that scrutiny will come only if the player in truth is made available, which would be weeks or even months after the first mention of the possibility by fans and media.

So slow down.

February 11, 2013

Will stadium vote cause the Dolphins to have more urgency this offseason to impress fans, voters?

This morning the Dolphins will make official what the Miami Herald confirmed on Saturday, namely that the team's attempt to secure hotel bed tax dollars and other tax breaks to help finance half of a $400 million upgrade to Sun Life Stadium would be put before the voters of Miami-Dade County in the next few months.

It's a gutsy move by the team. It's also something of a Hail Mary because even though local taxpayers are not generally having to fork over the money themselves, asking voters to  approve any tax increase of any kind (even when it's on tourists) is often not a winning proposition.

And it doesn't help that the county's elected officials did such a horrible job vetting the Marlins and dealing with that rogue organization as they negotiated a deal for the new Marlins Park. Public monies beyond bed taxes were used in that deal because the Marlins were losing money and promised to field a great lineup in exchange for their deal.

Except it was eventually learned the Marlins were making money. And the politicians never got the team to open its books before or after that fact came to light. And after one season of upgrading the roster, the club conducted a fire sale and will field a glorified Triple A team lineup this coming season to save money.

So the Marlins and the politicians that voted on their behalf screwed Miami-Dade.

And the fallout from that bomb threatens the Dolphins in this upcoming vote.

But ...

This vote also offers the Dolphins a grand, awesome opportunity. And, if embraced by the club, it can mend the recent narrow but apparent fissure between the team and its fans.

As you know, Dolphins' fans have not been thrilled with the recent direction of the team. The last four years of 7-9, 7-9, 6-10 and 7-9 were not great, but this break was coming well before that with Nick Saban lying and Bill Parcells splitting and Cam Cameron stinking.

So the love affair has been a little rocky and the historically low attendance last season was proof.

But, as I mentioned, this offseason, this vote, this time in team history is a grand and golden opportunity. Think of it, if the team reaches for greatness and that lights a fire under the fan base to turn out to the polls, we could go to August with:

1. A better team filled with promise and some actual proven stars.

2. A team whose house will be modernized.

3. A team that actually seems exciting to its fans.

4. A team that will remain in South Florida for a long, long time.

5. A team whose fans backed it at the polls.

And all this without winning a game. Indeed, all this without even playing a game.

So how does this happen?

Remember right after the season when I suggested the Dolphins handle this offseason in the fashion the Miami Heat handled the offseason in which they got Dwyane Wade re-signed, and added Chris Bosh, and LeBron James and Mike Miller?

Remember the offseason the Heat went big?

That's what the Dolphins have a chance to do this offseason with $46 million or so in salary cap space and five draft picks in the first three rounds.

And so that is the opportunity. The Dolphins can tilt the offseason, the roster, the fan base and the vote in their direction if they simply have the, um, fortitude to go big this offseason as the Heat did three years ago.

Get a bigtime playmaker or two in free agency. In other words, win in free agency. Then add talent in the draft that doesn't suggest you're going to be the same team you've been for a decade. Get that seam-threatening tight end. Get a promising safety to team with Reshad Jones. Get us some corners that knows how to do this thing recently foreign in Miami, what's it called? Oh yes, intercept the football.

Add a running back if you have to.

Hey, how about checking out the trade market, too. Percy Harvin might be out there. Explore, it! (I'm not ready to push for that move per se. But at least explore. Don't sit in a dark film room studying tape of the right guard from New Mexico, when freaking Percy Harvin is dangling out there.)

Dare to be great. And let your fans know as much.

Now, all this sounds like fanciful sportswriter mumbo jumbo, right? It's just a columnist with a vivid imagination sitting at his computer, eating twinkies and filling space.

Well, it would be that if I was lazy.

I'm not lazy.

I texted several of my Dolphins sources about this very subject Sunday. I asked if the team welcoming a vote would cause greater urgency to do something exciting?

The resulting answers were mixed.

First, the topic has not been discussed internally. Remember, the announcement is today. So there has been no grand strategy session within the organization to see if football operations can be helpful to the business side.

This, by the way, has to fall at the feet of owner Stephen Ross. He knows the business side has agreed to take the issue to the voting booth. He had to approve such a move. So once he got done with that conversation, why didn't he pick up another phone (my understanding is billionaires often have multiple phones) and call the football side and say, "Hey, general manager Jeff Ireland, we're doing this presser on Monday. We've got $200 million on the line here. The vote will likely be in May. I want to hear what you're going to do to help. And, you better help!"

That's the owner's job. He has business interests that represent $200 million dangling on a vote, it should automatically dawn on him to rally every asset within the organization to make sure the team does what most professional sports teams are in business to do: Win.

Win the offseason.

Win the fans over.

Win the vote.

(Peanut gallery speaking: "But, Mando, we want a team that wins during the season, not the offseason.")

Shaddup, ya foofs.

There are no games available to be played now, okay? And to win in the regular season, you have to build a team successfully in the offseason.

Anyway, I call on Ross, the head of the Dolphins organization, to get his business side hand and football side hand to speak to each other -- one hand working with the other -- and come up with a strategy that willl make the entire organization emerge from this victorious.

Is the business side into the idea?

Heck yes. In talking to a couple of people on that side, they completely agree that if football operations makes some significant advances or moves that convince fans the team is clearly going to be better, they are more likely to win the election.

"This would seem to be the time to make a statement," one source texted me.

That same source asked if signing a particular player would get fans fired up. I cannot divulge the name of the player used because my job is not to get sources in trouble for tampering. But suffice to say the player is a looming unrestricted free agent who makes plays.

I told the source it would help. But I believe it will take more than one player to light the excitement flames for Miami fans. Also, and more importantly, it's going to take adding more than one player to make the Dolphins much, much better. That's the beauty of all this. The business side would love signing several talented players because it helps them. The football side should love the idea of adding gobs of talent because it helps them.


So the business side would be pleased if this was the approach.

But, and here comes the newsy part of this post, the football side doesn't seem too excited with the idea at this point. I texted a couple of folks on that side, too.

I asked if the vote would bring greater urgency to get bigger name players.

"Nope," was one response I got.

"Doubtful," was another response. "We make football moves for the longterm well-being of the franchise, not to please fans."

Alrightie, then.

So, the football side is not on board at this time. It is going about things like this is another offseason that brings opportunities to improve. But it is not approaching this like it's make-or-break and $200 million and the long-term viability of the team in South Florida are at stake.

Do I agree with this?

Yes. And no.

I agree that winning rather than pleasing fans should be the goal. Always. But some people act like winning and adding bigtime players are mutually exclusive. BREAKING NEWS: Adding great players is what brings winning.

Also, if you're telling me that despite the need to please fans with a big name addition you would, as a hypothetical example here, refuse to pay Mike Wallace $15 million per year, I agree with you.

But, on the other hand, if you're saying you'd refuse to go to $10 million per year because you want to also add the $4 million per year guard, I'd think you're a certifiable dunce.

Deep threat. Imperative.

Guard. A grunt that isn't going to win you games.

(Peanut gallery speaking: "But Mando, you need good interior players too to win big in the NFL.")

Shaddup, ya twits.

You can't name the four guards that started in the Super Bowl and even if you could, you can't name one occassion when a guard scored in the NFL this season. And teams must score points to win. Also, the Dolphins have guards on the team already.

So where does this all leave us?

We have one side of the organization hoping the other side gets on board while the owner is in the middle having not yet broached the topic with either.

Let's hope this changes. There is still time before free agency. There is still time before the draft. There is still time before the NFL trade period opens. There is still time before the Miami-Dade County vote.

Most importantly, there is still time for the Dolphins to become a synchronized organization with all sides harmonizing toward a common goal. 


February 08, 2013

A look at Sean Smith's cut at free agency

I lke Sean Smith. He's intelligent. He's well-spoken when he wants to be. He seems to get it when he wants to and that was apparent when he lost weight and worked his backside off in training camp prior to the 2012 season -- understanding his contract year loomed. And he's problematic for the NFL's big-bodied wide receivers that like to win by simply being bigger than the cornerbacks they face.

So I like Sean Smith on the Dolphins.

But he is not elite.

He is not franchise player material as one local publication reported in January.

He's, well, something between terrible and good. And that makes him inconsistent.

Smith started this season a house on fire. He locked down Larry Fitzgerald. He did great work against A.J. Green. And then something changed.

Suddenly he was giving up first downs like it was part of his job description. And yes, that was him in the picture and beaten on a handful of TDs caught by opposing wide receivers. According to ProFootballFocus.com, Smith yielded more combined first downs and touchdowns than any other NFL cornerback. That number is a whopping 46.

Something didn't seem to fit. Seems he's not comfortable against smaller, quicker receivers so he plays off. And at 6-3 and 218 pounds, he doesn't have the quickness and explosion to close on receivers on out patterns and comebacks for first downs.

That's not all.

The elephant in the room is the guy should be an interception machine. But isn't.

He plays well enough often enough that balls come to him. Unfortunately, he drops most of them. He dropped one against Indianapolis last year that could've been the difference between a win and loss. Yes, he had two picks on the season, but his drops have far outnumbered his catches over his Dolphins career.

And he was a wide receiver in college at one point!

I didn't know what to make of Smith after the season so I asked two former Dolphins receivers about him. I asked them to compare Smith to former Miami cornerback Vontae Davis. Both players said the same thing.

"I'd much rather go against Sean than Vontae," one said. "Vontae is a pain in the [butt]. He gets his hands on you, he holds, he grabs, he gets away with stuff that nobody sees. Sean is just easier. He's fast as hell. But he guesses a lot and a lot of time he guesses wrong."

And so this is the resume Sean Smith will take to free agency in March.

I believe he's going to free agency because his agent David Canter is confident Smith will be a hot commodity in free agency. I don't doubt that's true. First, Canter has made his reputation by knowing the market. Second, Smith looks like a beast if you put on the Arizona tape.

But I was there for all 16 games this year. And all the games in 2011. And the ones in 2010 once Smith recovered from being benched in favor of, wait for, Jason Allen.

And I don't think it would be wise for the Dolphins to spend a lot of money on Smith. I say that that knowing that Canter will be asking for a lot of money for Smith.

As I have reported, that camp believes the market for Smith is similar to the Brandon Carr contract with Dallas or the Jason McCourty contract with Tennessee. Carr got $50 million over five years and McCourty got $43 million over five years from Tennessee.

So Smith is looking for anywhere between $8-$10 million.

The Dolphins don't see that. And much as I like Smith and respect Canter, I don't see it either. The performance simply does not rise to that level. And frankly, I'm not sure it rises to half that level, either.

Then there's the other question that must linger in the mind of the Dolphins brass: What is going to happen once Sean Smith gets paid? He worked hard to get ready for the contract year. And then he faded anyway.

Is he going to work harder once he gets guaranteed money?

I don't know that he isn't. I also am not sure he will.

The cornerback market has potential bargains. Yes, Dominque Rodgers-Cromartie will want a big payday that I don't think he's worth. But guys such as Cary Williams and Brent Grimes and Michael Adams will be out there. They all come with questions marks. That makes them no better than Smith.

But they'll probably be cheaper than Smith, at least initially.

Then there's always the draft. A couple of years ago the Dolphins fished a little-known Utah cornerback out of the draft's second round and he started immediately. He wasn't great but he wasn't bad. And he was cheap. That made him a good value.

His name is Sean Smith.

But for $8-$10 million? No thanks.


Former GM Polian agrees with fake GM Salguero (sometimes)

OK, so I'm not really an NFL general manager and have never even played one on TV. I have seen my share of Dolphins general manager moves that I agreed with and disagreed with and, I must say, I've been right about as often as they have.

(Actually more so, but don't want to brag. Fact is if I'd been Miami's GM Drew Brees would have been the QB and not Daunte Culpepper, Anquan Boldin would have been on the team and not Brandon Marshall, Hakeem Nicks would have been on the team and not Vontae Davis, Vince Wilfork would have been on the team and not Vernon Carey, Jimmy Graham would be on the team instead of John Jerry, and Chad Henne would have been replaced in 2011 instead of 2012 because I knew after 2010 he didn't have it. I also never would have cut Shelton Quarles, never would have signed Jake Grove and never would have traded up for Daniel Thomas because I thought DeMarco Murray was better. I also would have traded away two first-round picks and a second for Robert Griffin III instead of drafting Ryan Tannehill. Oh, I've also had misses. I would have picked Brady Quinn instead of Ted Ginn Jr. and I would have traded for Kyle Orton.)

Having said all that, I don't really know anything because I only go by what I see with my own eyes on TV or in practice. I do not study tape because, well, nobody's ever asked me to.

But I admit it felt good recently when I read former six-time NFL executive of the year Bill Polian, the architect of Super Bowl teams in Buffalo, Carolina and Indianapolis, run down his grades for some members of the coming free agent class on ESPN.com.

Polian apparently prepares for free agency by categorizing UFAs by grade. A is for starting caliber players worthy of big starter money. B is for guys he'd sign but only if the contract makes sense for the team. C is for players he'd sign for low salary and short terms with low bonuses.

And immediately apprentice Salguero would have a philosophical disagreement with Master GM Polian. Apprentice GM Salguero believes free agency is dangerous enough without roaming into the weeds signing C players. I don't give bonuses to C players. Veterans with a couple of years left in the tank can sign for minimum in Miami because there are no state taxes and the weather is great (after September) and the coaching staff is professional and and we have a chance to make the playoffs because the Jets and Bills stink and that should be four wins right there.

Otherwise, I'm putting young guys on the team and asking the coaches to do their jobs, which is to develop them.

Apprentice GM Salguero uses free agency to make bounding leaps that help the team significantly, tangibly. Apprentice GM Salguero uses free agency sparingly but sparklingly. In other words, I'm not going to use the resource unless the resource sets off a nuclear blast in my division or fills a great need with a star player that the draft will not immediately provide.

Apprentice GM Salguero also believes free agency is for keeping your own best players because you know them better than anyone but also for reshuffling the deck so to speak so I do not sign my own mediocre players just because I'm comfortable with them. Free agency is for getting signficantly better, not keeping the status quo.

I believe when you re-sign one of your own mediocre guys, you are losing value because he is likely to continue performing at the same mediocre level he has been except he's now doing it for a higher salary. Nope, I don't play that with guys that are merely mediocre because I don't want to pay more for continuing to be 7-9. I'll pay more for better player. But paying more for the same caliber of play is losing ground. Am I making myself understood?

(GM Salguero could've been a writer).

To wit:

Master GM Polian graded several players we all have an interest in discussing. I'm going to tell you what he said and remind you how I feel about those players. Then you'll see where we agree and disagree.

The master GM grades Pittsburgh receiver Mike Wallace with an A.

"Wallace is a good route runner, has good instincts and typically has good hands, but he's small and you worry about injury," Polian said. "Inconsistency in the past also is a concern. Pittsburgh didn't reach a deal with him, which will make some teams wary, but this league is always looking for WRs with speed who can take the top off a defense -- and he can do that." Wallcegoes

The apprentice GM agrees with the Mike Wallace grade. He is an A. Indeed, I see him as an A-plus. If you've spent five seconds on this blog, you know this is the one free agent I would sign were I running the Dolphins.

Am I worried about Wallace's size? No, as he doesn't miss many games. Am I worried that Pittsburgh not signing him is a red flag? No, I'm celebrating their inability to sign an excellent playmaker. Look, I need a player that can take the top off the defense, give my offense big-play ability, and add speed to the roster. Wallace does those things. He'd be my No. 1 target in free agency. Period.

Next, master GM Polian tackles Jake Long and gives him an A grade.

"His reputation will make him an A player," Polian writes, "but he is an injury and age concern to me.  He is turning only 28 to start next season, but he already has played 74 games, making a long-term deal a risk. He's missed time the past two seasons as well. Someone will pay him, though."

Well, apprentice GM Salguero disagrees. With respect, of course.

I don't pay for reputation. I don't pay a player for what he was two or three years ago. I don't pay for Pro Bowls earned on name recognition. I pay for what I saw recently and what I'm projecting I'll see going forward. And I don't like what I'm seeing going forward for Jake Long. Yes, he's great to have on the team. Yes, he's a hard worker. Yes, he's good and fills a key position when he's healthy. But he's breaking down. He's played worse, not better the past two years. And in those last two years, he's been on injured reserve in December.

Apprentice Salguero's team will be making a playoff push in December and going to the postseason in January. Players with an A-grade are healthy and helping at that point, not watching from the injured reserve list. Remember, durability is a critical factor when judging players. And on that factor, Long is failing. Jake Long is a B player for me. If he wants to stay with Miami, he can be about team and town and play for $6-$8 million a year with no more than four years on the deal. I'd rather sign him for three years but you have to give up something to get something. If he's in it for the idea that "someone will pay him," as master Polian says, then go get paid elsewhere, bro. We want players that want to win and prove something, not those that are driven by getting paid. We paid you more than you really deserved in your last contract, based on what you delivered the final two years of the deal. Now it's time you help us out.

Otherwise, I'll move Jonathan Martin to left tackle and draft a right tackle in the second round and we'll have two young starters for one-quarter of the price it would require to pay Long. That will also free more money to spend on players that matter more -- playmakers.

Master GM Polian says Randy Starks is an A player.

"He's older, but he could be effective as an inside, space-eating 3-4 or power 4-3 kind of tackle," the master writes. "He had a very good year with Miami. This type of player is hard to find, so I imagine he'll have a market."

Apprentice Salguero agrees. Apprentice Salguero wants badly to keep Starks. He wants $8 million per year? How about $7.5 mill, Randy? Come on, buddy, you love South Florida. You don't pay state taxes. That big truck you drive is too beautiful to get all muddy and salty in the snow and sleet. Plus, we're going places as a team. You're agent played for the Dolphins. You're comfortable here. And did I mention no state income tax?

(Don't mock. New York for example has an 8.97% state income tax for folks in Starks' bracket. On $1 million, that's $89,700. If Starks is making $8 million per year, that's $717,600 more in his pocket every year if he stays in Florida. Over a four-year deal, that's $2.87 million more in his bank account that won't be there if he's playing for the Jets or Giants. In Ohio the upper rate is 5.97%, Illinois 5%, North Carolina 7.75%, Georgia, where former Dolphins DC Mike Nolan might like Starks, it's 6%. Louisiana, where the Saints defense needs upgrading, it's also 6%.)

Master GM Polian believes Ed Reed is an A player. Reed, you may recall, was tied to the Dolphins by some CBS report that speculated Miami would be interested. I don't believe that will be the case but maybe Jeff Ireland is desperate. Edreedhappy

Apprentice Salguero does not grade Ed Reed an A player. He's going to be 36 years old in September. He's going to return to Baltimore. He's coming off a Super Bowl championship so he's accomplished his biggest career goal other than going to the Hall of Fame.

I pay players with their goals ahead of them and who are 26 not 36. If New England wants him, go for it. The Dolphins are not at the same stage of development as the Pats. It would be a pleasure to make him guess wrong a couple of times and have Mike Wallace go over the top of him. Nothing against Reed. I love the guy. He's a U guy. I'm a U guy. But I'm more a W guy. That's more important to me.

I'd rather have Glover Quin for one-quarter the price. He's a tight end lockdown machine. He makes plays. He's also an upgrade over Chris Clemons.

Moving on.

Master GM Polian grades Reggie Bush. He gives the Dolphins leading rusher of the past two years a B grade.

"He's a name, but at this stage in his career, he's a third-down guy," Polian writes.

Apprentice Salguero agrees. My starter next year is Lamar Miller who is 218 pounds compared to 202 for Bush and who runs a 4.39 compared to a 4.49 for Bush. So I'm going bigger, stronger, faster, cheaper. Less experienced? Yes, but that will be forgotten by November.

By the way, if Bush wants to remain with the Dolphins,I'm thrilled. He gets a two-year deal worth about $3 million total. And the deal comes with the understanding that he is the third-down back and no longer the starter. Why?

Because I want my starting RB to average more than 60 yards per game rushing. And I think Miller can do that. If the Lions, or Jets or Giants think Bush can do better than that and pay him bigtime, then God bless, Reggie. Loved having you.

What about Packers WR Greg Jennings? Well, master Polian grades him a B player.

"Jennings will be a big name, but this is the classic question mark: How much do you pay a guy who will turn 30 at the start of the 2013 season and is coming off of two injury-plagued seasons?"

Apprentice Salguero is troubled here.

So Long is an A player despite being injured the past two seasons, but Jennings is a B player because he's been injured the past two seasons? I get that Long is two years younger. Master Polian should understand that Jennings doesn't crash into a 300-pound defensive end or chase speedy 3-4 LBs every play like Long does.

Anyway, I don't necessarily want Jennings but may have to chase Jenning depending on how well I do with Wallace. If I land Wallace, I don't really need Jennings -- particularly not for the $7-$8 million per year he thinks he's worth.

If I land Wallace, I speak to Jennings and see if he'll come to Miami for $5-$6 million per year. He does that, I sign him. He gets a better offer elsewhere, I re-sign Brian Hartline. They both get a better offer elsewhere, I think about adding Martellus Bennett as my tight end -- someone who will be thrilled to get $4-$5 million per year, I suspect. (This one would require GM Salguero to stare into Bennett's soul for an entire day to see what's in there because I have worries about this guy's makeup.) Master Polian rates Bennett an A player.

And failing all that, I keep searching and get ready to draft somebody and maybe two somebodies. I'm also drafting a tight end because Michael Egnew ain't it, brother.

Oh, on the topic of TEs, master GM Polian grades Anthony Fasano a B player.

"Receiving and speed aren't his strong suits, but he can block. As a solid, all-around guy, he'll get the job done,' the master writes.

To which apprentice Salguero says, "meh."

I'd sign him. I wouldn't pay him, if you get the drift. I make sure I go into 2013 with Fasano either off the team or as my backup tight end. If he's my starter again, I suck because I didn't upgrade the position. If he's Jeff Ireland's starter again, then Ireland really sucks because he didn't upgrade the position for the fifth consecutive year. (Nothing personal, Jeff, but good God man open your eyes to the importance of seam-stretching, redzone-playmaking TEs!)

Did you notice a couple of prominent Dolphins free agents -- Chirs Clemons, Sean Smith -- are not on the list of Polian's A, B or C players? So did I. There's a reason.

[BLOG NOTE: Check back later for a post about Miami cornerback Sean Smith. You must not miss it.]


February 07, 2013

Kiper and McShay make draft picks for Dolphins; Salguero says be careful about both selections

We are closing in on that time of year, my acquaintances. Draft microscope time!!!

I call this time draft microscope time because the actual draft is still two months away and the games are in our rear-view mirror. So the actual work for the draft involves workouts and visits and the Combine and interviews -- things that are meant to put a player under the microscope without him, you know, actually playing football.

And to celebrate today, I bring you Mel Kiper's and Todd McShay's latest mock drafts.

Both of ESPN's draft "experts" published their mock drafts today and at the No. 12 selection where the Dolphins are picking both went in polar opposite directions.

Kiper had the Dolphins picking Tennessee wide receiver Cordarelle Patterson.

McShay had the Dolphins picking Texas safety Kenny Vaccaro.

Interesting that the Dolphins are apparently so deficient in the passing department (on offense and defense) that the "experts" have them needing both a wide receiver for the offense and safety for the defense in the first round.

That should tell you folks that think the Dolphins are close to competing for the AFC East crown how far this team truly is.

At any rate, let me give you some food for thought here.

Neither projection is wrong at this point. Obviously. But both projections will depend on what the Dolphins do in free agency.

If, for example, the Dolphins go into free agency and sign my newly adopted son Mike Wallace (I added him to the Salguero family that already includes RG3 and Tim Tebow), then it becomes very, very unlikely the team invests a first-round pick on a wide receiver. It doesn't make sense when there are needs at cornerback and defensive end and yes, even safety. That would make the Patterson pick unlikely.

One possibility here would be if the club signs a veteran receiver such as Wallace (yippie!) or Greg Jennings (meh) or Dwayne Bowe (boo!) but allows Brian Hartline to leave via free agency. Then the club's need at WR will remain such that it could require first-round impact.

And if, for example, the Dolphins re-sign pending free agent Chris Clemons, who started every game at one safety spot this year, it is less likely the team will then re-invest in the same position at the level of a first-round pick to take Vaccaro. Remember, I have reported that the team has been talking to safety Reshad Jones about a contract extension so that is an obvious signal one safety spot is locked down.

The Dolphins have too many needs to extend Jones, re-sign Clemons (an expense beyond what rookies make and too expensive to have him sit as a backup) and then use a first-round pick on Vaccaro with the expectation he would start with Jones.

That is the strategic look at the situation as it relates to other moves in free agency that neither Kiper nor McShay are considering.

Now, as to the value of each player, there are some serious questions.

First, both Kiper and McShay have their guys going to the Dolphins at No. 12. But on the ESPN "Big Board" that lists players by grade, Kiper has Patterson listed at No. 15 and Vaccaro at No. 17. Yeah, that's what the Dolphins should do: Draft guys at No. 12 that you have valued several slots lower. In my country, that's called a reach.

Second, let's take a look at the players themselves. Both are solid. Both will be playing in the NFL next year. But neither screams, "I'm going to be a star so watch out!"

Vaccaro is said to be a bigtime playmaker. The Dolphins secondary needs this badly because taking the football away or making plays that get the defense off the field is something the Dolphins need more of. But I look at Vaccaro's stats and he had two interceptions last season. He had no forced fumbles. And he had two passes defensed, not counting the bowl game. And he played on a defense that gave up 50 points to Baylor, 63 points to Oklahoma, and 48 points to West Virginia.

I have not watched the guy on tape, but his statistics don't exactly suggest he's the next Ed Reed.


He looks the part. He's 6-3 and 205 pounds. He's billed as fast. And he's got the overall stats. He caught 46 passes for 778 yards and a 16.9 average with five touchdowns last season. It was his only season at Tennessee.

But dig deeper into that last paragraph.

I would be concerned Patterson spent his first two years at a JUCO and then transferred to Tennesee. Why? What's the story on him not getting in to a major college coming out of high school? Why is he jumping to the draft after only one season?

Whatever the answers, the bottom line is Patterson has limited experience against top flight college talent. So that makes me a bit uneasy.

Then there is this: A closer look at Patterson's impressive stats reveals some issues.

Of his 46 catches, Patterson feasted against lesser opponents but was a much more average player against better opponents. He caught only 16 passes against ranked AP teams and his average was only 11.4 yards per catch against those teams -- five yards less than his overall average.


Against the SEC's two best teams -- Georgia and Alabama -- Patterson basically disappeared. He caught two passes for 31 yards against the Bulldogs. He caught one pass for 25 yards against the Crimson Tide.


Meanwhile, he padded his stats with nine catches for 219 yards against Troy. It was the only game all season he went over 100 receiving yards.

That doesn't mean the kid won't play big in big games. That doesn't mean he's not gifted. That doesn't mean he's not a first-round pick.

But it does mean he requires a lot, much, tons of study to make sure he's worthy of a No. 12 pick. That is a big investment. And he's not exactly screaming that he's the next Randy Moss.

GM Salguero: Put Jared Odrick on the trade block

Watching from the sideline as NFL teams are beginning to divest of talent for salary cap reasons, I assume you know the  Dolphins don't have to cut any players for cap reasons but might want to do that with a couple of guys anyway.

I posted that potential Dolphins list right here a couple of weeks back.

But as this is a lead-the-pack blog not a catch-up blog we move forward to my next thought: And that is this is the time of year teams begin to inventory their talent and see how it fits and where it is lacking and how to make that which does not fit pay some sort of dividend.

And in pondering that, I look squarely at Jared Odrick.

Odrick is a Dolphins defensive end who just finished his third season with the team.

And he is interesting because he simply doesn't fit right now.

Although defensive coordinator Kevin Coyle defended Odrick during the season and made the point the kid is fine as a 4-3 defensive end, the truth is Odrick is not fine as a 4-3 defensive end. Odrick was drafted in 2010 by a team that ran a 3-4 defense to play five-technique. The five technique in the 3-4 is called the defensive end, but he's really more like a tackle.

The 3-4 defensive end has to be a great run-stopper and generally is a 300-pounder. If that player can rush the passer that's a huge plus, but it's not the end of the world if he's more of a run-stopper. And for that assignment Odrick is well-suited.

Odrick is a good run-stopper and has 11 sacks in 33 NFL games, which would be very good for a 3-4 DE.

But the Dolphins no longer run the 3-4. They are primarily a 4-3 team and the requirements for the defensive end in that alignment are different. A 4-3 DE must be a pass-rusher because that scheme doesn't employ linebackers to be the primary pass rushers. The ends are the primary pass rushers. And while the 4-3 DE should be solid against the run, that is not how they make their big money.

So to recap: A 4-3 DE must be a fine pass-rusher and run-stopping comes second. A 3-4 DE must primarily be an excellent run-stopper and pass rushing is secondary.

Everything about Jared Odrick screams 3-4 DE.

And having him out there as a 4-3 DE tells me the Dolphins don't have a legit 4-3 DE as a starter opposite Cameron Wake.

So what to do?

Well, the Dolphins will be looking to add a better fitting 4-3 DE somewhere in the draft. If they don't, something is wrong. And if that draftee becomes, well, a player then perhaps the Dolphins can toy with the idea of moving Odrick inside as a defensive tackle, where he's probably better suited.

But ...

If I were running the team or helping the general manager run the team, I'd be standing on the table suggesting the team trade Jared Odrick.


He's not a fit for the scheme. He was an investment for the last scheme and the last scheme is long gone. He's still got value around the NFL because a lot of NFL teams run 3-4 defenses. But his value is greater to those teams than the Dolphins. Remember that the St. Louis Rams paid $6 million per season to Kendall Langford to sign as a free agent 3-4 DE. If Randy Starks hits free agency, he'll be asking upwards of $8 million per season.

Odrick is going to cost $700,000 next year and only $765,000 in 2014. That's a long way from $6-$8 million.

It makes sense to put Odrick on the trade block because perhaps a team such as Denver or San Francisco might give up a very low first-rounder for him. Or a team like Oakland might give up a very high second or third rounder for him -- assuming it has that ammunition.

I cannot be certain this is true because he's not on the trade block right now. But you put him there to gauge interest. Let's see what happens. One cannot catch fish unless you dangle bait.

(And now the peanut gallery complains that Odrick is a former first-round pick and giving him up for anything less than a first rounder is bad value).

Look, it's not a great situation. But did you read the part where he's not a fit at DE for a 4-3 team? Remember that part? This is a huge year for linemen in the draft. Perhaps giving up some value to get a pick that will bring a legitimate 4-3 DE is better than using a shoehorn to try to make a 302-pound 3-4 end fit the 4-3.

The Dolphins can take the draft pick it gets for Odrick and use it or add it to other ammo they already have in the first couple of rounds of this coming draft to trade up for a better player.

And that player might actually be a fit for the schemes the Dolphins now run.

February 06, 2013

Dolphins should consider both sides of character issue

The Dolphins passed on available wide receiver Titus Young Tuesday after he was waived by the Detroit Lions Monday. That's not extremely surprising despite the fact the team clearly could use a young (23), speedy (4.43)  pass-catcher with upside.

The reason Miami's pass on Young is no surprise here is because the player was, well, toxic.

Young wore out his welcome in Detroit by being late to meetings, complaining when the ball wasn't thrown his way and being borderline insubordinate with coaches at times. He could also be considered borderline delusional because he actually said he's just as good as Calvin Johnson -- who had twice as many yards this year as Young has had in his two-year career.

So the Dolphins were among the 31 NFL teams that did not put in a waiver claim for Young, as USA Today first reported. The St. Louis Rams were the only team to put in a claim for the troubled young man.

I can understand why the other teams passed.

I can even understand why the Dolphins passed although Young would have come extremely cheap ($800,000) and could be easily booted if he acts a fool before next season's start.

But the fact the Dolphins could have had and passed on Young -- they could have had him by claiming him because their claim came before St. Louis -- brings up a bigger, more important issue for me.

I use Titus Young merely as the jumping off point to ask the question, are the Dolphins under Joe Philbin willing to take risks on players with questionable backgrounds or character red flags?

I ask this question because Philbin showed little regard for keeping so-called troubed players on the team in his first NFL season. I don't mean he had issues with players with legal issues. Jonathan Amaya had a legal issue and Philbin ultimately kept him on the team.

He had issues keeping players that are, shall we say, high maintenance.

With Philbin as coach the Dolphins traded Brandon Marshall. With Philbin as coach the Dolphins cut Chad Johnson. With Philbin as coach the Dolphins traded Vontae Davis.

All of those moves were not necessarily good football moves as all subtracted talent from the roster. They were moves to clear the locker room of players Philbin wasn't extremely comfortable having around because they were all, in one way or another, high maintenance.

"In making these decisions we base our evaluations on a set of criteria that support our organizational goals and include a player’s performance both on and off the field," Philbin said after Johnson was cut. "Essentially, we take into account the overall body of evidence to determine whether an individual is the right fit for this organization, and more specifically this football team."

Obviously, Johnson and his act wore on Philbin. Obviously, the idea of Marshall giving him or his coaches lip like he did the previous staff or possibly acting out on the sideline as he did previously didn't thrill Philbin. These were not necessarily football decisions.

Same with Vontae Davis. The Dolphins actually gave up a talented player at a position of need because Davis came to camp out of shape, didn't exactly rush to get right, and was actually running with the second-team because coaches didn't like the way he was working. And yes, Davis has a history for drinking.

It wasn't about one thing with these guys -- not even Johnson who sealed his fate by being arrested for domestic violence.

It was about whether guys will fall in line quickly. It was about immediately meeting a criteria. It was about marching to the beat of the Dolphins band (if they had one).

“I don’t know about the moves themselves, but I think you have to have an idea for what you’re looking for in terms of a vision for the team," Philbin said soon after the Davis trade. "What type of team you want to have, what kind of men you want to have in the locker room, and clearly I think we have some good ideas of where we are heading in that direction. That’s not to suggest that Vontae… Vontae Davis and I never had any confrontations or real issues, and I appreciate all the efforts that he put forth while he was here.

"But yes, there are certain guys, and I can give you an example of when go to the combine sometimes and you sit there for 60 interviews and you interview guys.  You know there are some guys that aren’t going to fit. That doesn’t mean they’re bad guys or they’re not good players either, but when you’ve been doing it for a while, you get a sense of the people that you feel like you can work with, you can connect with, guys you can help reach their potential. Guys that you feel good about. But that’s part of it, that’s part of the whole process; figuring out who is a good fit and who isn’t."

Yes, it's about Philbin feeling comfortable with the players. And he's clearly not comfortable with certain types ... certain troubled types.

That leads me to this:

How much will that cost the Dolphins?

I ask because if Joe Philbin is going to need a choirboy roster, his team is never going to be very good. That's because the sad truth is a lot of NFL players have problems. Some drink. Some are perpetually late. Some have anger issues. Some are loose with their hands around their women. Some have sassy mouths. Some have nightmare families that haunt. Some smoke marijuana. Some have maturity problems. Some have checkered pasts. Some have checkered presents.

And a lot of those guys are or become outstanding players.

Cam Newton.

Vincent Jackson.

Ray Lewis.

Michael Vick.

Ben Roethlisberger.

Randy Moss.

Jason Peters.

Bryant McKinnie.

Aqib Talib.

Vernon Davis.

I could go on, but you surely get the drift. Troubled players often become very, very valuable because they are simply very good.

Look at the most recent Hall of Fame class: Warren Sapp will be inducted. Cris Carter will be inducted. Both were troubled at points in their careers. The Eagles actually cut Carter because of alcohol and drug use. The Hall also boasts Lawrence Taylor and Michael Irvin.

Would those guys have been a fit for Philbin? Can you imagine Philbin saying he wouldn't want LT on his team because although he was perhaps the most dominant defensive player of his generation he had issues with cocaine abuse?

My fear is not that the Dolphins will have too many of these troubled men on the roster. It's that they won't have any. My fear is that the Dolphins would look at Taylor at the Combine and not draft him because he's not pristine enough. My fear is that in searching for "a good fit" the Dolphins might opt not to draft or sign or be patient with a player that has flaws that require attention.

Let's face it, some guys are projects not necessarily because it takes them a while to get rolling on the field. It takes them a while to get rolling in life. Many of these guys eventually figure it out and, having pushed down their troubles, let their gifts rise to great heights.

Jimmy Johnson, who had no fear of drafting troubled guys, maneuvered the draft to make sure he could stay away from Moss. How'd that work out? This administration stayed away from Dez Bryant and although that story is still not fully written, it's not looking so great for Miami so far.

My point?

Hard and fast rules that all the players must be a good character fit right now at the expense of losing amazing talent is a safe way to operate. But it's also a way to miss out on some great players, too.

The Dolphins have to consider balancing that out a bit more because, so far, they haven't shown that's what they're willing to do.

February 03, 2013

What must happen for the Dolphins to be Super Bowl good?

The NFL season ends today with the crowning of the Super Bowl 47 champion.

Tomorrow we begin a new season. As I write here many fans and even some teams will study the Ravens and 49ers to see if they can find clues or reasons both those teams are Super and everyone else, well, isn't.

So I gave you my opinion. What's your's?

What must happen for the Dolphins to become a Super Bowl team? No, I don't believe the distance between them and the playoffs is that great. Three or four more wins and the Dolphins are a playoff team. But a Super Bowl team?

That gulf is wide, in my opinion.

Still, can the Dolphins bridge that gap in a couple of years, as the 49ers went from 6-10 in 2010 to the NFC championship game in 2011 and the Super Bowl today?

What must happen for that to happen?

February 01, 2013

Complete list of restricted free agents according to NFLPA

A few years ago the New England Patriots identified a restricted free agent they truly liked -- thanks to a recommendation from a friend of Bill Belichick named Nick Saban -- and they went after the player.

No, they didn't end up signing Wes Welker as a restricted free agent. But they did work out a trade for him with the Miami Dolphins.

That was 2007. Restricted free agency has seen precious few players changing teams since then despite the success Welker has had with New England. The fact is as draft picks have become more valuable (based on the fact rookies now make less) fewer teams are willing to give draft pick compensation for players that will also come with new contracts.

Nonetheless, the NFL Players Association collects the list of players that do not have four years in the league but are out of contract as restricted free agents.

Here is that list:


AF Palmer, Michael TE 3

AF Smith, Antone RB 3

BB Brown, Colin OL 3

BB Jones, Donald WR 3

BB Nelson, David WR 3

BR Cox, Morgan OL 3

BR Dickson, Ed TE 3

BR Harewood, Ramon OL 3

BR Jones, Art DT 3

BR Pitta, Dennis TE 3

BR Reed, Brandon WR 3

CHB Collins, Nate DT 3

CLB Ogbonnaya, Chris RB 3

CLB Williams, Eddie RB 3

CNB Miles, Jeromy S 3

CNB Quinn, Richard TE 3

CP Neblett, Andre DT 3

CP Ness, Nate S 3

DB Ball, Lance RB 3

DB Clark, Chris OL 3

DB Colquitt, Britton P/K 3

DB Gronkowski, Chris RB 3

DC Costa, Phil OL 3

DC McCray, Danny S 3

DL Fox, Jason OL 3

DL Spievey, Amari S 3

DL Young, Willie DE 3

GBP Crabtree, Tom TE 3

GBP Dietrich-Smith, Evan OL 3

GBP Francois, Rob LB 3

GBP Shields, Sam CB 3

GBP Zombo, Frank LB 3

HT Gardner, Andrew OL 3

IC Edds, A.J. LB 3

IC Linkenbach, Jeff OL 3

IC Olsen, Seth OL 3

IC Vaughn, Cassius CB 3

JJ Bolen, Brock RB 3

JJ Bosworth, Kyle LB 3

JJ Estes, John OL 3

JJ Potter, Zach TE 3

JJ Selvie, George DE 3

JJ Shipley, Jordan WR 3

KCC Rucker, Martin TE 3

MD Amaya, Jonathon S 3

MD Mastrud, Jeron TE 3

MD McCann, Bryan CB 3

MD Moore, Marlon WR 3

MD Spitler, Austin LB 3

MV Jefferson, A.J. CB 3

MV Kropog, Troy OL 3

NEP Fletcher, Dane LB 3

NEP Hoomanawanui, Michael TE 3

NOS De La Puente, Brian OL 3

NOS Drescher, Justin OL 3

NOS Galette, Junior DE 3

NOS Ivory, Chris RB 3

NYG Brown, Andre RB 3

NYG Brown, Stevie S 3

NYG Cruz, Victor WR 3

NYG Pascoe, Bear TE 3

NYG Torain, Ryan RB 3

NYJ Cumberland, Jeff TE 3

NYJ Howard, Austin OL 3

NYJ Mauga, Joshua LB 3

NYJ Purdum, Tanner OL 3

OR Adams, Phillip CB 3

PE Anderson, Colt S 3

PS Dwyer, Jonathan RB 3

PS Kapinos, Jeremy P/K 3

PS McLendon, Steve DT 3

PS Redman, Isaac RB 3

PS Sanders, Emmanuel WR 3

PS Sylvester, Stevenson LB 3

SDC Ajirotutu, Seyi WR 3

SDC Alexander, Danario WR 3

SDC Brinkley, Curtis RB 3

SDC Windt, Mike OL 3

SF Brock, Tramaine CB 3

SF McBath, Darcel CB 3

SLR Cole, Justin LB 3

SLR Cudjo, Jermelle DT 3

SLR Stewart, Darian S 3

SS Butler, Deon WR 3

SS Gresham, Clint OL 3

SS Maragos, Chris S 3

SS McDonald, Clinton DE 3

TBB Blount, LeGarrette RB 3

TBB Cutrera, Jacob LB 3

TBB Te'o-Nesheim, Daniel DE 3

TT Velasco, Fernando OL 3

WR Baker, Chris DT 3

WR Banks, Brandon WR 3

WR Jackson, Rob DE 3

WR Paulsen, Logan TE 3

WR Sundberg, Nick OL 3

WR Young, Darrel RB 3