January 09, 2015

Ballers On Campus

UPCOMING HOME GAMES/MATCHES

Swimming & Diving, FIU Relays, Saturday, 1 p.m.

Women's Basketball, vs. Alabama-Birmingham, Sunday, noon

Elsewhere on The Herald news platform, it was noted that the HBO show Ballers shot over at the University of Miami. We must note here that, before going over to Coral Gables, the show shot at FIU Stadium and used FIU staffers as extras for scenes of practice.

While on the subject of on campus, I'm hoping to talk to the early enrolling football recruits today, all of whom are on campus and going through the registration process (for those eternally predicting last minute flips).

Pitt officially announced Josh Conklin as its new defensive coordinator this morning.

 

January 05, 2015

Jerseys, Warmups, Shoes, Pound & Wide Receivers

UPCOMING HOME GAMES/MATCHES

Swimming & Diving, vs. Central Connecticut, TCU and FAU, Thursday, noon

Women's Basketball, vs. Middle Tennessee State, Thursday, 6 p.m.

Swimming & Diving, FIU Relays, Saturday, 1 p.m.

FIU announced they've signed a five-year deal with two one-year options with addidas that'll allow the athletic equipment and apparel manufacturer to keep clothing all FIU teams, as they have done since 2005. The deal's announced as being worth $2.6 million.

That includes uniforms for FIU's sports teams;  a suite at FIU Stadium; and signs at FIU Stadium, FIU Arena and FIU Baseball Stadium.

WOMEN'S HOOP

For the third time this season, 6-foot redshirt freshman forward Kiandre'a Pound has been named the Conference USA Freshman of the Week. She averaged 14.3 points and 9.0 rebounds per game in FIU's 1-2 week.

FOOTBALL, PAST & FUTURE (?)

USA Football chose FIU commit Austin Maloney, a 5-11 wide receiver out of Columbus High, for its Under 19 team that'll play Team Canada in the 2015 International Bowl Feb. 7. Maloney gained 939 yards and scored 11 touchdowns on his 59 catches this season and returned a punt for a touchdown.

Wide receiver Glenn Coleman, who graduated as a student in December, and safety Justin Halley will play for the American side in the Medal of Honor Bowl Game Saturday in Charleston, South Carolina. Especially for Coleman, who averaged 20.3 yards per catch on his 23 catches, this is a huge opportunity to showcase his talent for NFL scouts.

 

December 08, 2014

Football Finances

The death of football at Alabama-Birmingham after a season of resuscitation brought the expected reaction from those looking to be first to Next: who else will dump football because it costs too much?

And then the many of the same people late in realizing FBS college-affiliated football is a business began looking at college-affiliated football programs as a business exactly like NFL franchises. Which is, of course, just as facile and foolish as looking at college-affiliated football as just another extracurricular activity.

So, they see a place like FIU, crowds like this year's Senior Day gathering...

IMG_0869[1]

...and assume the school will take a hard look at following UAB's lead.

Pshaw. If you want a good look at the business of football, especially at the mid-major level, check out this piece. Learn the economic reason why many schools like FIU, to quote Bear Bryant, do love the football.

December 03, 2014

Load $16 Mill & What Do You Get?

Maybe they'll know up at That School Up North Near Del Boca Vista in two years. FAU's president figures that's how long it'll take for the school to build all the fun, new stuff that the $16 million Schmidt Family Foundation gift makes possible. They're still going after the rest of the $45 to $50 million needed for this project. But they got Richard Schmidt, an FAU donor but not an FAU athletics donor, to pony up a pile of green.

This should put FIU on notice that it's time to get up offa its thing and find some Other Peoples Money of its own. And do so before FAU decides to do something about that locker room-deficient basketball arena and puts FIU a lap down.

MEN'S BASKETBALL

Few points and a few fans.

It turned out the 38 points FIU allowed Kennesaw State in Tuesday's 59-38 win established a new record for opponent offensive futility. Kennesaw's 26.9 shooting percentage also might've been a new low, but the occasional sketchiness of early FIU basketball games makes that a tough confirmation. Your thoughts on Kennesaw's shooting, Judge?

KennMountLandis

Thank you.

After an overabundance of home football games (eight), there's a paucity of home men's basketball games (three) before the turn of the year. Despite a team fat with newbies, skinny on expectations, bad opponents and an established student tradition of giving basketball games the Friday afternoon lecture hall class treatment, FIU drew an average of 1,276 fans. 

That's 251st in the nation. But it's far from the Kiwanis Club-sized gatherings of past early season games against schools athletically one step above those you see advertised on Judge Judy.

UPCOMING HOME GAMES/MATCHES

Women's Basketball, vs. Central Florida, 6 p.m., Saturday

 

December 01, 2014

FAU up, UAB down and out, FIU where?

UPCOMING HOME GAMES/MATCHES

Men's Basketball, vs. Kennesaw State, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.

If we're to believe the noise from the media around That School Up North Near Del Boca Vista, tomorrow FAU will further differentiate itself from FIU by announcing a massive donation to the athletic department, the largest in school history. According to the story by the Sun-Sentinel's Nate Taylor, the gift will fund a new athletic facility that'll be primarily used by the football team. It might even include an indoor practice facility.

Huh. Why don't we have announcements like this from FIU athletics? Clearly, there's a giving spirit among those who love FIU. The rest of the university's as festooned as Mount Sinai hospital with major donor names. The last similar announcement I can recall concerned a donation from Judy Blucker, the mother of FIU women's sports and one of the university's early pillars, and her partner Annette Gathright. They're leaving FIU a $1 million gift in the form of a dual life insurance policy that'll endow scholarships for female athletes.  

When I talked to FIU athletic director Pete Garcia almost three years ago, he said FIU's youth as an athletic department with a football team meant its massive alumni base still needed to get used to ponying up the dollars necessary to be a top flight football program.

Looks like FAU's alumni base got used to it. And you can bet the Woodsys' new facilities will be shown off to recruits along with FAU Deep In Debt Stadium. Then, for those recruits FIU wants also, the Boca Boys' will contrast their new toys with the more modest facilities of their public school cousins down in Miami-Dade.

At least FIU will still have a football program. The University of Alabama Board of Trustees, with Bear Bryant's son essaying the Mr. Potter role, reportedly will kill Alabama-Birmingham's football program.

This is the same board that blocked UAB's hiring of Jimbo Fisher before Fisher went to Florida State and blocked the building of an appropriately-sized downtown stadium for UAB football. That kept the Blazers rattling around Legion Field, a massive, historic stadium now as depressing as the surrounding underclass neighborhood. A stadium version of a once-mighty senior citizen now fighting collapse, Legin's upper deck was condemned and amputated, yet it remains too large for a UAB.

Oh, they'll speak the hooey about athletics undergoing the same campus-wide long-term strategic planning the rest of the school is. Hogwash. That football program spent much of its existence being treated like an underfunded Cinderella. This happens as first-year head coach Bill Clark, some kind of prince for not blasting his employers for dashing his and his players' immediate futures, got UAB to bowl eligibility with Saturday's win against Southern Mississippi.

Conference USA doesn't want you in the club if you can't bring some football. UAB and its nice basketball history will get shunted off to some non-football conference. C-USA will search for a replacement.

Georgia State? It's in Atlanta and C-USA does like schools in or near major markets.

Louisiana-Lafayette? Lou-La brings strong fan support and talent in many sports, especially football.

South Alabama? The other end of the state's version of UAB in Legion Field: South Alabama in Ladd-Peebles Stadium. But South Alabama's not under the University of Alabama Board of Trustees' thumb and has otherwise suitable faciliities from what I saw there two years ago.

Anyway, it's a sad day considering what UAB accomplished this year. Well, sad for about the 22 seconds until schools consider those on that talented roster with eligibility remaining will be free to sign anywhere else and can play next year.

 

Hoops By the Pound; Radio, Radio

UPCOMING HOME GAMES/MATCHES

Men's basketball, Tuesday, Kennesaw State, 7:30 p.m.

Cindy Russo didn't even have to offer a scholarship to get FIU women's basketball's best post-Jerica Coley recruit. The school wound up getting a delayed two-for-one during the recruiting of redshirt freshman forward Kiandre'a Pound's brother, former FIU defensive lineman Andre Pound.

"I was here on his visit when they were building the stadium," Kiandre'a Pound said. "When they were showing him around, I was there and I fell in love with the school the first time I came. I think I was in seventh or eighth grade. I always said I was going to come here. God made a way when I got an offer from them."

Seeing the athleticism in Pound that the FIU roster needed, Russo recruited the 6-0 Pound as a guard. But, figuring Pound could use her quickness on the bigs inside, Russo moved her to forward. After 34 minutes total the first two games this season, Pound's logged 29, 36 and 37 minutes while putting up 24, 25 and 18 points, respectively, on 24 of 52 shooting from the field (46.1 percent) and 16 of 18 (88.9 percent) shooting from the free throw line. After FIU's 74-61 loss to Virginia in Sunday's FIU Thanksgiving Classic closer, Pound was named to the All-Tournament Team.

Though Pound looks more like a kicker's or wide receiver's sister than a defensive tackle's, she moves with strength. Against Arizona Friday, she powered through a Wildcat getting full palm on the ball near the apex of her jump and fired in a baseline shot. Another time, she simply muscled through the Arizona defense for a shot. She brought in some contested rebounds in the manner of a mother snatching a toy from an overly grabby child in Target.

"I've been physically strong. I'm (only) 146 pounds," Pound said. "I think it's a mental thing. I don't really think about the physical. You feel like you're strong, you're just going to be strong." 

Despite Pound's emergence, FIU remains winless after five games.

RADIO

The other tournament teams -- Arizona, Virginia, Toledo -- all had radio play-by-play broadcasts from the tournament. FIU doesnt' have hoe or away basketball radio for either gender. Maybe this juxtaposition hit me because I couldn't follow the FIU men's basketball game against Wright State Friday by radio as I drove to the game.

Toledo has radio from the road for women's basketball. FAU has men's basketball road radio as well as coach's shows for football and men's basketball each. But FIU has nothing?

No reason for that.

 

 

 

November 27, 2014

Losing, But Not That Much

The national media push to shed light on the sad situation at Alabama-Birmingham, where UAB football supporters maneuver to keep the University of Alabama Board of Trustees from killing off the UAB football program it's abusively starved, led to this story by CBSSports.com's Jon Solomon.

Readers fall victim to a bad headline -- "UAB football isn't alone in losing money for athletic departments" -- and quick judgement. Because of the headline and the accompanying chart, some interpret the story as saying FIU football is losing the athletic department $19.9 million per year.

If that were happening, everybody from athletic director Pete Garcia to the equipment managers wouldn't be looking for a new job. They'd be looking for a lawyer, a plea bargain and the prison with the guys who con you out of $100,000 instead of the hard ankle guys knock you in the head for $10.

FIU football doesn't spend $19.9 million per year. It spends around a third of that. It's operating budget going into 2013-14 was $6,604,000. Now, I'm not saying the football team doesn't lose money. Most do. Many more used to before television came along to play sugar daddy to the less powerful in the Power Five and the entire Group of Five.

What Solomon's story points out is how many athletic departments lose money before student fee income and state subsidies get added. FIU's still getting 77.4 percent of its athletic budget from student fees. That's under 80 percent. It's still far too high. For a school with so much enrollment and local alumni, it speaks of a disconnect with giving time or money to the athletic department.

 

 

November 13, 2014

Survey Down; Scalia Up (Again)

The survey asking fans, alumni, students and faculty why they weren't coming to games has been taken down from the FIU Alumni Association site.

According to an FIU source, Athletics asked someone at the Alumni Association to put up the survey and that person did so despite lacking the authority to do so.

Alumni Association President Frank Pena said he thought a survey properly timed, after the athletic/academic year finished, would be a good idea.

SWIMMING & DIVING

Sorry I didn't get this up previously, but freshman Silvia Scalia received her second Conference USA Swimmer of the Week honor for Nov. 3-9. She set a Biscayne Bay campus pool record, third best in FIU history, of 1:58.77 in the 200 backstroke and was on the victorious 200 medley relay as FIU whipped Illinois State. 

Related articles

November 12, 2014

FIU Athletics Wants Answers! They Want The Truth!

Can they handle the truth?

The Athletics Department, through the Alumni Association, has put out an online survey to find out why students, alumni, faculty and staff generally avoid FIU athletic events the way South Florida politics avoids honesty.

From the page hyperlinked to above: "In recent years, there has been a noticeable decline in attendance at many of our collegiate sporting competitions – including football, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, softball, men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball (sand and arena), swimming and tennis – despite recent successes in many of these programs. It is our hope that your input will help us to identify the causes of this decrease in fan participation as well as to assist us in finding ways to mitigate and reverse this trend."

Give them credit for reaching out. I'd love to see the responses.

 

 

November 03, 2014

Well, There's Always The Swim Team...

Since my post a week ago on the postseason chances for the fall sports teams...

Men's Soccer: Beat FAU 2-0 Wednesday to stay alive for the Conference USA tournament then lost 1-0 to Kentucky to get eliminated. A win in the regular season closer against Old Dominion can only tie New Mexico and South Carolina, each of which beat FIU head-to-head.

Women's Soccer: Tied Marshall 1-1 Thursday and were shut out of the conference tournament when Louisiana Tech beat FAU in overtime. The remaining match, Sunday's makeup with Alabama-Birmingham, was cancelled as neither team would qualify for the tournament. Unless football pulls off a natural hat trick, this 8-8-2 record will be fall's Best of FIU.

Volleyball: Lost 3-1 to Rice and 3-1 to Charlotte to fall to 3-10 in conference, 6-20 overall...but they...are...ALIVE, in a pack with UTEP, UAB, Middle Tennessee and Charlotte, all of which have three conference wins and one of which will get the eighth and final conference tournament spot. Three conference matches remain for FIU: at UTEP (tossup), at Texas-San Antonio (12-0 in conference), home season closer against Louisiana Tech (1-11 in conference).

Football: Lost Saturday 31-17 to Rice and need to win three straight after losing three straight to even get a bowl to give up its phone number. The Former Sunblazers are three-point underdogs at Old Dominion this Saturday.

The swim team, a winter team that warms up in the fall, moved to 3-0 by beating Indian River Saturday 174-126 as last week's Conference USA Swimmer of the Week, freshman Silvia Scalia, won the 100 backstroke and 200 back. Freshman Brittney Fant won the 500 freestyle and 200 butterfly (my shoulders and lats hurt just typing "200 butterfly").

Friday, the aquawomen host Illinois State. 

September 24, 2014

Athletics Committee Meeting Stuff

The Board of Trustees Athletics Committee meets every few months to get reports on the athletic department’s doings from athletic department people with titles. There’s public discussion of those doings between the suits on the Committee and the Athletics Titles. The Suits and Titles exchange pats on the back or harrumphs. The Titles vow to improve. Then, the Suits get coffee as a slightly different set of Suits comes in for the next BOT Committee meeting. The Titles whoosh back to the west side of Camp Mitch.

The value in these meetings come in the chunks of information or analysis the Titles lay on the Suits. After a moment of feistiness from committee chairman Jorge Arrizurieta regarding the minutes of the February meeting, the Sept. 10 meeting carried a happy feeling. Not quite Up With People happy, but it was a Prozac-and-Percoset party compared to the last two Athletics Committee meetings I attended.

STUFF A CASUAL FAN MIGHT CARE ABOUT

A committee member happy to see the FIU vs. the University of Miami football series revived asked if FIU was working on any kind of football relationship with Florida State or Florida.

“We’re working with all the major schools around the country,” FIU athletic director Pete Garcia said. “We wanted home-and-homes. We feel we can bring those games here. As you’re seeing Pittsburgh this week, Louisville’s coming here to play, we feel at this point in our development, we want to do home-and-homes. We’re willing to play anybody anywhere as long as we do home-and-homes.”

STUFF A HARDCORE FAN MIGHT CARE ABOUT

Garcia admitted sophomore Stephanie Texeira, the softball team’s best player as a freshman, played a larger than usual role in the selection of Gator Rebhan as FIU’s new softball coach.

“Obviously, when we go through the process of selecting a head coach, for the most part, you don’t talk to the student athletes that much about the search process. This was a little bit different,” Garcia said. “She was very adamant about what they wanted. The night we selected our next softball coach, she was actually sitting in her car about two hours outside my office waiting to hear if Gator was going to be our next coach.”

Early on in these things, the athletic department presents a proudly FIU example of the student-athlete ideal. It gives the committee a hot chocolate feeling inside before getting an ice bucket challenge of real problems elsewhere. Texeira got the call for this one. It won’t be her last.

Texeira pointed out her Mom-and-Dad home is only 15 minutes away but she stays at FIU. She extolled the Student-Athlete Academic Center (SAAC), the first of many attaboys for the SAAC on this day.

She went on to talk about Rebhan: “Gator has been my mentor for 6 years. I played for him in travel ball. I was fortunate enough to have a coach who was able to push me, to challenge me, he did everything he could to push me to the best that I can be. And it’s not like he picks on me. He picks on everybody. And everybody knows he does it because he cares.”

Then, with “We have a Turtle (baseball coach Thomas). Now, we have a Gator,” Garcia introduced Rebhan.

“This is a dream come true for somebody who was born and raised in Miami, coached the last 20 years here to be a coach at FIU,” Rebhan said. “It is an honor. I think the admiintration and the support of everybody to give me this opportunity.”

He stated, “One of the goals here is I want to keep the local talent from leaving. We have so many great players here in our backyard that for years we let get away. That’s one thing I want to focus on – keep our local players here. Girls like Stephanie, All-Americans, we keep them here, it builds excitement and fills the stands.”

He also thanked the administration for the new softball stadium. Rebhan pointed to the softball team’s 3.34 team GPA last year to applause and stated the goals for the season: 40 wins, winning the FIU-hosted Conference USA tournament, “and hopefully go far in the regionals.”

Rebhan closed with “One thing about girls softball, from coaching baseball and softball -- with girls, they have to feel good to play good. And right now, being out there watching these girls out there, they feel good. They feel good about themselves and the program.”

NUTS AND BOLTS STUFF THAT FEW CARE ABOUT IN PROPORTION TO ITS IMPORTANCE (JUST ASK FOOTBALL AND MEN’S BASKETBALL…)

Without mentioning FIU’s most recent appearances in the national media noise, Garcia swung into talking about Compliance, the SAAC and academic progress rating (APR). This is usually when “How did this happen?” gets asked often enough to be each meeting’s signature catch phrase.

Not this time. Compliance hadn’t bungled anybody’s eligibility. Nobody’s been put in academic time out. There’s no new APR problems.

“I feel very comfortable about what we have going on in the SAAC and the Compliance department with our APR and it’s been a total, total team effort,” Garcia said. “We’re starting to see the results. In a lot of these areas, you don’t see the results until two or three years down the line. What’s really encouraging is we’re seeing immediate results.”

He sang of Vice President for Academic Affairs Elizabeth Bejar – “She’s a workaholic. She gets things gdone. She’s very demanding, I’ll say that. But it makes everybody go to the next level.” – before handing the floor to Compliance Director of several months Hank Harrawood.

“I know from our last meeting, the certification process was important to make sure our student-athletes on the field are indeed able to represent us on the field,” said Harrawood, hired in the months following the Ray Taylor and Marita Davydova oops-ups that cost both basketball teams.

Now, the new web-based certification system will, he said, “allow for cross checking. It’ll allow everybody to go back and see what others have done. It’ll allow for greater accountability in the certification process and help majkre sure our athletes are indeed able to represent us when they do represent us on the field.”

Also, all the coaches who needed to be certified to recruit off campus passed the certification the first time. Harrawood said from what he’s heard that’s an FIU first.

Arrizurieta gave kudos that, so far, Compliance being under the Athletics umbrella works. Garcia extolled Harrawood’s work ethic with “weekends, he’ll call me in the middle of the night. Then, he introduced APR consultant John Shukie.

Shukie used to work for the NCAA. Now, he’s the president of Forward Progress Athletics Company, which works with 20 schools. Right before Shukie made that transition, he got a call from FIU as a school staring the APR abyss of men’s basketball and football.

“Let me paint the picture for you in the summer of 2013 when I did get that call,” Shukie said. “FIU athletics, especially men’s basketball and football, were facing some difficult APR issues. The men’s basketball team knew they’d be ineligible for the men’s basketball tournament coming up this past academic year. Football was looking at a very difficult sittaiton where they might fall in that same boat.”

“The first thing I did was diagnostically figure out, How did FIU get there? What put them in this situation?”

Shukie listed staff instability (the SAAC had more directors the last few years than Gone With the Wind) plus a lack of resources. Then, when bringing up the APR issues that penalized basketball and threatened to do so with football, he pointed at former men’s basketball coach Isiah Thomas and former football coach Mario Cristobal.

“What was lacking were some coaches who didn’t necessarily buy into the concept of APR,” Shukie said.

Having had a long APR discussion with Cristobal as he groaned about the difficulty in raising a low APR, I’d call that assumption into question. I'd also say the problems in Compliance and the SAAC, the same ones being celebrated as being fixed, contributed heavily to the basement APR. Such as the SAAC advisor who advised one athlete to take a course he'd already taken and passed, helping his academic ineligibility (she later advised a track athlete right into inelgibility).

“We are still, in some senses, paying for what happened in 2010-11 and 11-12 now because we keep those numbers until they roll off four years later,” Shukie said. “We had coaches, at least from what I can tell -- who have since left (or been fired – DJN), I did not deal with them -- weren’t necessarily recruiting with an academic purpose. They were probably recruiting with an athletic purpose, to win games, but there didn’t seem to be a real strategic plan for recruiting student-athletes who could be successful on the court or field and off the court or field.

“Over the course of the year, I’ve witnessed a 180,” he continued. “I thind it starts at the top. When I say at the top, there’s a group of people at the top. It starts with Pete Garcia stressing to his coaches, emphasizing to his coaches the importance of academics. I wasn’t a witness to what was going on before I got hired, I assume those conversations happened before I arrived as well.

“What I have seen is coaches buying into that. Especially in football and men’s basketball, where a lot of my work has been focused. We have coaches that buy into the concept of APR. They’re bringing in student-athletes who are focused athletically and academically.”

So, does Shukie think change started at the top with Garcia or at the coaching level? He seems to say both.

Anyway, Shukie lauded the involvement of men’s basketball coach Anthony Evans and football coach Ron Turner: “I’ve had more phone calls from Coach Turner than any coach I’ve worked with across the 20 schools I’m involved with.”

Shukie said any athletes coming to FIU just for a visit have their academics fully vetted before coming. If not in order, he claims, no visit. Remember the cancelled visit by all-purpose guy Javonte Seabury, for a while FIU’s highest rated 2014 football recruit? There you go.

“Part of our strategic plan is to have them create relationships with the faculty For men’s basketball, we require them to face to face interactions with the faculty, not just sit in the back,” Shukie said. “They have to actually go introduce themselves. We also require men’s basketball to participate in the on-campus mentoring program so they can have an administrative, faculty mentor. Not just helps them academically, but ties them to this school. So they feel tied to FIU and not just tied to FIU men’s basketball program.”

Arrizurieta half-joked, “if we were the first (client) and helped you get another 19 clients, we should get a reduction on our fee.”

Garcia countered, “Mr. Chair, just the penalty alone for football for any school that doesn’t make the APR (minimum) is $300,000. He’s worth every penny.”

The February meeting introduced a new bigger budget for the SAAC. This meeting officially introduced the new SAAC Director, Wes Maas.

Maas said the SAAC will add two learning specialists by the end of this semester as well as an assistant director position. The SAAC itself is getting a construction version of a workout-and-wardrobe makeover.

Maas wants to increase “the pride in our facility so our student athletes, who are 18 or 19 years old, feel as good about walking into the SAAC that they feel when they walk into the math lab on campus, which is amazing, state of the art and it’s new.”

They won’t be walking in for study hall. Maas eliminated it because he felt that a system of simply counting hours turned SAAC employees into timekeepers. It failed to provide the in-person attention some athletes need.

“We want to create independent learners. We don’t want to hold hands, we don’t want to facilitate eligibility,” Maas said. “We take the syllabi, break down the reporting status, so we know every week what our student athlete is supposed to be doing. We bring them in on Sunday or Monday. We have the student athlete create their objectives for the week, what they’re supposed to complete and when. We can assign them tutoring, we can assign them office hours with faculty, we can do anything in that time to ensure the student-athletes have the resources they need. Then we follow through the week and make sure the student-athletes complete the objectives they’re assigned.

“This is obviously for freshmen and athletes new to the university. But the idea is teach them how to do it, so that the next year they can do it and be independent in the process.”

After Maas finished, Arrizurieta said he was proud of the work the committee did in pushing for improvements in the SAAC and Compliance.

“Whatever else this board needs to do to support the initiative of athletics, the SAAC, Compliance, I’m incredibly happy to see that we are generally in the direction of progress, we’re tangibly seeing progress,” he said.

Vice Chairman Mitchell Adler assented.

“Thank both of you and the rest of the trustees for pushing the envelope and making us better,” Garcia said. “I’d like to thank President Rosenberg and the administration for giving us the resources we need to make this work. I echo the senitments that its been a team effort from both your stand point, the administration and everybody who’s doing the actual day-to-day work. I couldn’t be more proud of what everybody’s done and more excited for our future. Because without academic success, we’re not going to have any other kind of success.”

EPILOGUE

Arrizurieta stayed for the Finance Committee meeting that followed. He asked FIU Foundation president Howard Lipman if there was a policy of “a donor gone bad,” a clear reference to David Alfonso. The donation deal between FIU and Alfonso that put his name on the football field now called Ocean Bank Field ended after only three of its five years.

Lipman said as far as taking a donor to court “I don’t think that would be anything I would ever recommend.”

In 99 percent of cases, Lipman said, an unfulfilled donation occurs not out of any maliciousness but bad situation, i.e., market downturn, business dropoff, something happens in their lives (bad health and bad divorce can suck your money faster than the biggest black hole -- DJN).

“The last thing we want to go is create a policy toward the 1 percent,” Lipman said.

Arrizurieta said some protection must be given because “We’ve been through this before. It’s not intangible, it’s tangible and it’s happened.”

September 14, 2014

MacLaren Races to Medalist Honors; Early FIU-Louisville Line

While Michigan State quarterbacks starred in the NFL on Sunday, FIU junior golfer Meghan MacLaren starred as the medalist at the Michigan State-hosted Mary Fossum Invitational. MacLaren shot a 2-over 74 Sunday to go from one-shot down to two-round leader Grand Valley State's Gabrielle Shipley to a one-shot victory with a 5-over 221.

FIU finished tied for fifth as a team.

FOOTBALL

FIU opened a 28-point underdog to Louisville. It's down to 26 in some spots. FIU is 5-2 against the spread in the last seven games at home. 

 

September 12, 2014

Getting the Money Right

An FIU source got hold of me Thursday morning to correct a money matter from a previous post.

New Senior Associate Athletic Director for Revenue Craig Angelos makes $65,000 per year plus some money still owed him from his $141,000 job at South Florida. I'd wrongly figured Angelos would be paid in the same six-figure yearly amounts as Senior Associate AD Chief of Staff Heath Glick ($103,616, according to Florida Has a Right to Know), Senior Associate AD/SWA Julie Berg ($111,347 says Right to Know) and Senior Associate AD Bobby Staub ($110,000).

The total for the four Senior Associate ADs is $389,963.

IN ANSWER TO THE QUESTIONS IN THE COMMENTS

Angelos' FIU salary wasn't on any site. The Right to Know site updates every few months. I originally thought he'd be in six figures just because of his title and his USF salary. I requested his employment agreement. I was told it didn't exist. I requested his employment file. Ditto.

Pretty confident the person who corrected me was accurate. In a roundabout way, it fit with a conversation I'd had the previous day over a claimed salary error (they were wrong, I was right on that one -- I have the contract). Getting Angelos for a bargain rate fits perfectly, especially when the 2014-15 university budget puts the department's revenues at $24 million this year and expenses at $24.9 million. Got to clip coupons where you can, even if it's in personnel.

 

 

September 10, 2014

Conference USA says, "Whoops."

The full account of today's Board of Trustees Athletics Committee meeting can wait until tomorrow. Much like the one last spring, many words were spent on many issues, too many words to transcribe and analyze after a school Open House and dinner. This time, with the SAAC and Compliance Department better armed in almost every way, you didn't have much "how does this happen?" over Animal House grades and season-turning NCAA violations. So most of the many words bore happiness.

What I want to get to before I get to bed concerns two things from Conference USA. A CUSA spokesman said senior cornerback Randy Harvey will receive no further punishment for his brief bout with Wagner wide receiver Keith Foster. No word on what punishment Harvey will receive from FIU coach Ron Turner.

The same spokesman also admitted an officiating boo-boo from the Bethune-Cookman loss.

With 3:32 left in the first half and FIU down 7-3, the Panthers decided to go for it on fourth and 2 from the Bethune 3. Quarterback Alex McGough called a timeout to discuss the play call. The timeout ended, officials started the 25-second play clock. FIU arrived back for the next play on Miami time. His receivers still not properly set, McGough turned and signalled another timeout. The referee refused to grant the timeout. The play clock struck zero. Fourth and 2 became fourth and 7 after a delay of game call. FIU took the field goal.

Conference USA admitted the official should've allowed the timeout. The NFL long has had rules against calling consecutive timeouts without a play happening. Colleges let you take all the timeouts you want.

Would FIU have gotten the first down? Maybe, maybe not. Would FIU have scored a touchdown? Maybe, maybe not. But a touchdown there, instead of a field goal would've put them up 10-7 at halftime. If the second half plays out the same, it's Bethune having to throw at the end, not FIU. The Wildcats' second touchdown aside, their passing makes a regular football do things that a Nerf football does after the dog takes a bit out of it.

September 09, 2014

Turner on Tuesday; Athletics Committee Wednesday

Highlights from Tuesday's post-practice mini-media session with football head coach Ron Turner (yes, I was there now that The Cone of Silence has been lifted):

FIU came out of Saturday's game healthy. I didn't see any of Home Depot orange injury jerseys as the players came off the field.

Turner again said freshman Alex McGough will start at quarterback, EJ Hilliard will play at some point, but the breakdown of playing time remains to be determined.

No special preparations or changes in practice have been enacted to prepare for the midday surface-of-the-sun heat that'll come with a noon kickoff at La Cage. "I coached in Pittsburgh -- it gets hot there, too."

Pittsburgh running back James Conner, on whom I'll be writing for Wednesday's paper, said it was 93 degrees on the field for Pitt's season opener against Delaware.

SPORTS SUITS

The Board of Trustees Athletics Committee meets Wednesday, 8:15 a.m. in the Graham Center Ballrooms. Executive Director of Sports and Entertainment (EDSEl?) Pete Garcia, Compliance Director Hank Harrawood and a cast of several athletics department administrators give States of Our Corner of the World addresses to the committee. Always an interesting listen.

There's usually a top notch student-athlete paraded before the committee to show the department at its best in both "student" and "athlete." With Jerica Coley now just a graduate student and Aramis Garcia now in the Giants' organization, expect perhaps softball's Corinne Jenkins or Stephanie Texiera to be the showpiece athlete.

 

September 05, 2014

Kumbaya

What: FIU vs. the University of Miami, and the resurrection of what was repeatedly called a "crosstown rivalry" by everyone ignoring Miami-Dade geography.

When: Sept. 22, 2018 at Sun Life Stadium for UM's home football game. November 2019 at a date and site to be determined for FIU's home game (Can FIU get the 305-No-Fault second deck on La Cage by then?).

The money: For the $500,000 UM will give FIU in 2018, UM gets a probable win and a better crowd than any other probable win could draw. For the $500,000 FIU will give UM in 2019, FIU gets its best home crowd of the season.

What else: Both University of Miami president Donna Shalala and UM athletic director Blake James said each schools' non-football coaches have been "encouraged" to schedule the other school. That doesn't mean it's automatic (not betting on baseball).

James said, "While we don't have other dates to announce in other sports today, (FIU executive director of sports and entertainment) Pete (Garcia) and I have agreed in all our other programs to continue to work to schedule each other because of our belief in the great things it brings to the student-athletes at Florida International University and the University of Miami."

Like less travel to and from road games, fewer missed classes and more travel savings which, Garcia said, could be used in other ways to benefit student-athletes.

Question: Will both schools be one football coach down the line by the time those games are played?

 

 

 

September 04, 2014

Detente

Miami's athletic Cold War thaws. South Florida sports Sadat will shake hands with Begin.

FIU and the University of Miami officially announce resumption of their muscular rivalry Friday morning. Football draws the most attention, of course. There's mutual benefit -- UM gets a home opponent other than Florida State or Virginia Tech that should draw something other than heat to Sun Life Stadium. FIU gets a guaranteed excellent crowd with a home game against UM, wherever the game's played. Both get a road game without all the road game travel expenses.

But extending the hugfest to other sports also can give everyone the warm streudel feeling.

Basketball: anything that puts a charge in college-affailiated basketball in South Florida should be pursued. The difference in the ACC and Conference USA matters none. You can put the UM in the ACC but you can't take the Hurricanes out of South Florida. Neither gender fills The Branch in Coral Gables. FIU improved its atmosphere and crowd last year, but still needs opponents with buzz included. I never understood UM's aversion to coming west.

Baseball: They recruit the same high talent area. The coaches don't like each other. Who's up first?

Women's soccer: No travel, a few bucks better at the gate, maybe a litle nastiness. The usual reasons...

Track & field/Swimming & Diving: Little in college sports provide the sustained sizzle with periodic intense jolts than a rivalry dual meet in these sports.

Sort of like the US vs. USSR on the track during The Cold War.

August 26, 2014

Good Impressions

Some time over the last 11 months, somebody in the athletic department got slapped with good sense. Or, maybe slapped with good numbers. Or, maybe slapped with a sense of customer relations.

Somebody needed to be slapped with something. But you learn from your mistakes and it seems FIU did.

I just spoke with Michael Shorter, head of the Broward chapter of the Bethune-Cookman Alumni Association. Shorter's happy. Not Pharrell bouncing happy -- that might come Saturday if Bethune wins -- but happy with his interaction this year with FIU.

Shorter said someone from the ticket office reached out to Bethune-Cookman's alumni groups in Broward and Dade. The chapters went in together and bought a bloc of tickets and will be seated between the 30 and the 40-yard line. Shorter's bought some other tickets himself. You can be sure other BCU alums did the same. With BCU expecting another good team, Shorter expects the Wildcats to bring an even larger crowd than they did last year. That game led FIU home games in visiting team single game tickets sold (844) and overall single game sales (2,634).

(Technically, the East Carolina game's 3,103 were the most sold for a single game. Don't eat the manufactured, processed government cheese. The single game ticket sales listed under Internal was 2,392. For the Marshall game, the other game FIU was desperate for ticket sales to keep the NCAA bouncers fining them a cover charge or tossing them, Internal was listed as 1,094. For the first four home games? 551, 534, 698 and 244. Seemed a lot of sudden support from a different FIU pocket. I sent an e-mail to the highest reaches of Athletics asking what sales would be classified as Internal. The e-mail must have been lost...)

FIU got a great night last year from the Bethune-Cookman game despite itself. Hosting Bethune brings in the school's legendary band and a (perceived) beatable opponent from a school with an unusually loyal alumni base. They're bonded not just by the shared college experience, but to the school and each other by the shared Black Folks In America experience.

This game screamed for FIU to do two things: aggressively market the game, especially in South Florida's black communities, to high school and junior high bands of any ethnicity; and keep Bethune's fans happy. Treat them as Kerim Bey would.

The marketing department was in transition at the time. A unit's at its weakest when in transition, especially when transitioning from "one grad assistant" to "fully staffed."

Despite Bethune's win, FIU left a bad taste in the mouth of some Bethune-Cookman fans, particularly the alumni. Shorter talked to me the night before the game. He'd told me when the association saw their tickets would put them around the 10-yard line, they asked for something better. Let the young people sit there. The alums, grown folks who Shorter said are more serious about watching the game, like to be closer to the 50.

Can't do it, he said FIU told him. Those seats aren't available. He e-mailed me the night of the game, saltier and hotter than my fried rice. He saw the sections he requested they be allowed to buy sitting empty all night.

Someone in the school, involved in fund-raising, said exactly what I said last year about the little things at games. These people aren't at FIU every day. Their first hand experience with FIU, perhaps their first strong impression, comes largely from sporting events despite such events' tangential relationship to the overall university. 

Anyway, see you folks Saturday, one way or the other.

July 14, 2014

Heberling gets the title; golfers get academic thumbs up

Having saved head track and field coach money by assistant coach Ryan Heberling spending the 2013-14 indoor and outdoor track season as de facto head coach, FIU gave Heberling the actual title last week. Presumably, that means a bump from around $33,000 Heberling was making as an assistant. Former track coach Eric Campbell was making around $53,000.

Heberling, a former FIU javelin thrower, handled the throwers the last five years as an assistant and it's the women's throwers who have accomplished the most over the last few years.

GOLF

The Women's Golf Coaches Association named senior Shelby Coyle, sophomore Meghan MacLaren and freshman Coralia Arias as All-American Scholars. That's four golfers whose academic prowesss received notice last season -- Ashley Shimmel earned the Conference USA Commissioner's Academic Medal.

July 09, 2014

Aramis C-USA baseball's No. 1; FIU CBS Sports' No. 123

Conference USA awarded junior catcher Aramis Garcia its Player of the Year honor. Tuesday, Garcia completed a sweet sweep, being named Conference USA's Scholar Athlete of the Year for Baseball. C-USA names one for each sport.

In the spring, Garcia also received the Conference USA Spirit of Service Award and was on the conference's All-Academic baseball team.

ATHLETICS

Here's two different ways to rank athletic programs' on the field/court performances.

The first is the National Association of College Directors of Athletics Director's Cup, which takes into account 20 different sports. It's sort of like The Herald's All-Sports Award we do for high schools, except no greater significance is given to the more promiment sports. It's designed for the broadest-based athletic programs to reach the standings' penthouse.

In that ranking, 2013-14 FIU came in 257th out of 298 schools.

The other way is the CBSSports.com way, in which you consider only the marquee sports -- football, men's and women's basketballs, baseball and the most successful that season among the other sports at the school (for FIU in 2013-14, that probably would be swimming & diving -- second in Conference USA, scoring a few points at the NCAA meet). Heaviest weight given to football, second heaviest to men's basketball. nly schools with FBS football programs were considered.

Looking at things this way, FIU finished tied with Miami of Ohio, Nevada and Temple for 123rd. Or, last.

Stanford finished first, no matter which ranking was used.

Back to vacation and Argentina-Netherlands...

 


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