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Under The Bridge, It's Science Versus Politics

   The politicians love sex offender residency laws and over the past few years South Florida communities have outdone one another passing restrictions that bar sex offenders from living from within 2,000 or 2,500 feet of day care centers, schools, parks, even bus stops. The effect has been to stir up great public support with the notion that these laws protect children. Meanwhile, the laws are so restrictive that offenders have been forced into homelessness. In Miami, of course, sex offenders have famously been forced into a squalid camp beneath the Julia Tuttle Causeway.

      “It’s hard to imagine any other circumstance in which we, as a society, force people to become homeless,”  Lynn University’s Jill Levenson told me. Yet studies by Levenson and other social scientists have found little scientific rationale for these laws. She and two colleagues completed an analysis in December that echoed the findings of several other studies of the residency law phenomenon that has swept the country.  To read her study, click on Download Levenson study

Levenson’s partners in the recidivism study, Paul A. Zandbergen and Timothy C. Hart, partnered up two years ago to look at the impact on available housing for offenders affected by the residency laws. There study in the Orlando area reveals what has become painfully obvious in Miami. Download Zandbergen and Hart 2006

 

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cfcamerica

I am wondering a few things.

1. Why is Mark Lunsford, in a hearing in Washington to discuss the validity of the Adam Walsh Sex Offender Act, when he was caught with Child Pornography on his computer?

2. Why is Mark Foley, Free to Molest Children, when he was caught SEXTING little 16 year old underlings?

3. Why is a Florida Judge allowing Circuit Court Judge Samuel Kent to have 5 counts of Sexual Molestation dropped if he simply pleads guilty to lying. And Why is Mr.Kent going to get to Keep His Tax Paid Retirement?

4. Why is it that the powerful, rich, politically connected Americans are exempt from the laws imposed upon the poor, working class Americans?

The facts supporting all of what was asked above are located on our website.
http://www.cfcamerica.org

Last but not least...
How long will the citizens of this once great nation sit idly by and allow everyone's rights to be violated by the rich, politically connected Ruling Class? How Long?

PS, Thanks for your Great Writing.. Mr. Grimm

Christopher Castrataro

What my personal solution is is to seek declaratory or injunctive relief. My petition or argument will be based on the following 3 constitutional principals:

1) The Cities ordinance is Constitutionally invalid because it intrudes in an area purely of Statewide Concern.

2)Section 775.24(1), Florida Statutes clearly shows the Legislatures intent to pre-empt or occupy the field by placing a duty upon the courts of this State to uphold the laws which are part of its statutory scheme, in order to avoid "encroachment on the Legislature’s exclusive power to make laws in this area.” Thus the legislator had made explicit their intent to occupy the field in the regulation and control of sex offenders in this State.

3)FS 794.065, The states Residency Restriction Law is not a civil saction rather criminal.

It does not apply retroactively but rather after the enactment date showing the legislators intent to make it a punishment for a crime. In the States scheme, one who violates this section and was convicted under 794.011 with a first degree felony or higher, commits a third degree felony, while someone convict under 794.011 and was classified as a second degree felony or less, commits only a misdemeanor. The pain and penalty points back to the original offense and not simply for violating this section.

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