11/30/2016

Art Basel: A Garden of Delights at Design Miami

PJGarden

Photo courtesy of Perrier-Jouët

Perrier-Jouët continues to wow Design Miami/. Not only does the premier champagne company keep fairgoers in a mellow mood with an endless supply of bubbly, but for the past five years it has been introducing the design world to some of the most unique and memorable artistic displays.

This year, for the first time, the French company went outside Europe and selected an American to design its booth. San Francisco-based architect Andrew Kudless created a wonderland of lights, serenity and grace called simply, Strand Garden.

“We have very deep roots in the art nouveau philosophy,” says Axelle de Buffévent, Style Director for Perrier-Jouët. “So, I select designers that have the same philosophy in their way of working and their body of work. It’s about adding beauty to everyday life. It’s about being inspired by nature. It’s about studio work. And it’s about blurring the boundaries in between disciplines. As you can see, Andrew fits perfectly that vision.”

Kudless uses modern techniques to create contemporary design that references the past. The shapes, colors and soft lighting imbue the work with nostalgia from a century ago, a longing for something that is in our collective memory although never experienced in this lifetime. He uses various forms of technology from 3D printing to a CNC router saw to transform thin sheets of oak – 1/32 of an inch thick – into cylinders that, because they are slightly bent, appear to be slowly moving in some unseen current.

Illuminated from within, each strand glows in comforting saffron-gold shade. Dozens of these strands are connected to form two phalanxes that frame the back wall of the booth and partially surround a series of tables and stools designed with 3D printers. Atop one of the tables is a bounteous champagne bucket made from the remains of grapes used to make Chardonnay.

To someone who lives near the ocean, the 8-foot tall curvaceous strands of oak resemble golden seaweed. Illuminated from within, each strand glows in a comforting saffron-gold shade.

Kudless laughs with delight when told his work looks like the bottom of the sea.

“I love that,” he says. “Everyone that I talk to sees something different in it. And that’s kind of the idea, in a way. I was inspired by the work of many artists in art nouveau. When you look at their work collectively, there’s a recurring theme of these strands. Sometimes it’s a woman’s hair. Sometimes it’s a grapevine. Sometimes it’s these bone-like structures, branches, trees, things like that. Sometimes it’s much more abstract. You’re not really sure what it is. It’s flowing lines that evoke a vitality of nature and movement over time.”
         
By Siobhan Morrissey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art Basel: Mana founder mixes Philosophy and Politics


            Mana
Contemporary founder Moishe Mana took a philosophical - and political - point
of view at a booth housing a numerology/virtual reality piece, "Quadrium
Arithmetic" on Tuesday night, as Mana Wynwood opened to a crowd of
thousands for the week. Wheelchair bound after recent knee surgery, Mana
assured a reporter that numerologist and psychic Martin Dafni Gal, one of
Quadrium's creators, was "the real deal." And that the mission of his
vast Miami
space, a placeholder for a still more ambitious cultural development whose
exhibits this week include the Pinta Latin American art fair, was to raise
consciousness.

            "We do
not know where we're going or what we're dong or what comes next," said
Mana. "Our Mana project is to elevate awareness, consciousness, morality,
or we'll end up destroying the world. Those are the words of inventor Nikola Tesla [the
subject of another exhibit at the space this week.] If you don't have the
morals, the awareness, nothing means anything."

            The subject
of morality sent Mana into politics. "My message for people who voted for
Trump is that winning isn't everything," said the Israeli cultural
entrepreneur, who this fall displayed
the famed "naked Trump" statues at his Miami and New Jersey
projects and offered to donate $1 million to charity if the president-elect
would release his tax returns. "How much are we going to compromise our
life and our principles? Many times winning is not worth it. The problem is we
don't learn."
PHOTO CAPTIONS:Moishe&Gal foto - Psychic and artist Martin Dafnis Gal (left) and Mana Contemporary founder Moishe Mana on Tuesday evening at the opening of Mana Wynwood
Quadrium foto - Guests at the Mana Wynwood opening Tuesday night experiencing the virtual reality piece "Quadrium Arithmetic"

Jordan Levin
Arts & entertainment writer/music and dance critic
Miami Herald
3511 NW 91 Avenue, Miami, FL 33172
jlevin@miamiherald.com
t. 305-376-3639 | f. 305-376-5287
twitter: @jordanglevin

 

 

Moishe&Gal.JPG

Moishe&Gal.JPG

Goldman Properties Celebrate Miami Art Week With "Fear Less" Exhibit Featuring 12 New Works at Wynwood Walls




Shepard Fairey, Venus Williams, Jessica Goldman-Srebnick, Patricia Field (MannyofMiami)

Wynwood Walls presented Fear Less an exhibit featuring 12 new walls created by artist Ken Hiratsuka (Japan), AVAF (Brazil), Beau Stanton (CA, USA), Case (Germany), Dasic Fernandez (Chile), David Choe (CA, USA), Faith47 (South Africa), Felipe Pantone (Spain), Findac (UK) , Okuda (Spain), Pixel Pancho (Italy), Risk (CA, USA), and Tatiana Suarez ( USA)



Ron English and Janet Goldman (MannyofMiami)

Guest in attendance included the Goldman family, Janet Goldman, Joey Goldman, Jessica Goldman-Srebnick, Scott Srebnick, artist Ron English, Shepard Fairey, model Petra Nemcova, tennis great Venus Williams, nightclub impresario David Grutman, cell stylist Patricia Fields, and artist Peter Tunney.




Petra Nemcova (MannyofMiami)

Wynwood Walls is located at 2520 NW 2nd Avenue between 25th and 26thStreets

​Photos by MANNY of MIAMI

Hundreds turn up for opening of Sun Xun's Reconstruction of the Universe


A cool sea breeze bathed hundreds of revelers who turned out to see a massive video installation by Beijing-based artist Sun Xun near the W South Beach hotel Tuesday night. 

3D glasses were handed out for the 9-minute-and-change film, based largely on woodcuts and scroll paintings. The illuminated installation, sponsored by Swiss watchmaker Audemars Piguet, was housed in a specially built bamboo pavilion between 21st and 22nd streets on Miami Beach Drive. The exhibit was originally supposed to debut during Art Basel in Hong Kong in March but proved complicated to construct. It takes its inspiration from the five traditional elements of Chinese cultural tradition: metal, wood, fire, water and earth.

Reconstruction of the Universe is open to the public from Dec. 1 through Dec. 3 between 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. It is best seen at night.


Nicholas Nehamas
sun xun.jpg

Cocaine Cowboy loves Wynwood Art


Amidst the throngs of street artists and their admirers filling the surreal gardens of Wynwood Walls on Tuesday night was another kind of street veteran - Mickey Munday, who became famous (or notorious) in the Miami documentary "Cocaine Cowboys" as a pilot who transported coke for the infamous Pablo Escobar in the '80s. A uniquely Miami guy at a uniquely Miami party. "I never stopped having fun," said Munday, who sports flowing white hair and a wide-brimmed hat, surveying the chattering crowd. A projection on one wall at the party read "Fear Less," but Munday didn't need that instruction. He called running cocaine to Miami "millions of times" and serving jail time as part of his enriching experiences. Now he's got other ways to enjoy himself. "I love Wynwood. They encouraged graffiti - that's smart." Fun used to include designing super lightweight kevlar boats to run more coke more quickly and telling Escobar he was "stupid" for not maximizing his shipping schedule ("four guys left the room when I said that.").


Former cocaine cowboy Mickey Monday and artist partner Maurizio Raponi at Wynwood Walls Tuesday night.

Now it means more creative activities, like making the "Love Lock" park next to his North Miami home, where people put padlocks dedicated to love, and using his welding skills to make metal sculptures. Munday was at Wynwood Walls with Maurizio Raponi, an artist and metal shop owner who is his partner in the Star Gallery, on 71st Street in the Little River district - a good fit for the industrial area turning trendy art destination. "You're supposed to get old and not do things," said Munday. "Back then I had money to do what I wanted. Now I have time on my hands. I don't have a job, and I'm older than dirt. When the cake comes out, they can't fit enough candles on it, so they just set the whole cake on fire."

Jordan Levin

Mana founder mixes Philosophy and Politics



Mana Contemporary founder Moishe Mana took a philosophical - and political - point of view at a booth housing a numerology/virtual reality piece, "Quadrium Arithmetic" on Tuesday night, as Mana Wynwood opened to a crowd of thousands for the week. Wheelchair bound after recent knee surgery, Mana assured a reporter that numerologist and psychic Martin Dafni Gal, one of Quadrium's creators, was "the real deal." And that the mission of his vast Miami space, a placeholder for a still more ambitious cultural development whose exhibits this week include the Pinta Latin American art fair, was to raise consciousness.
Guests at the Mana Wynwood opening Tuesday night experiencing the virtual reality piece "Quadrium Arithmetic"
 "We do not know where we're going or what we're doing or what comes next," said Mana. "Our Mana project is to elevate awareness, consciousness, morality, or we'll end up destroying the world. Those are the words of inventor Nikola Tesla [the subject of another exhibit at the space this week.] If you don't have the morals, the awareness, nothing means anything."

Psychic and artist Martin Dafnis Gal (left) and Mana Contemporary founder Moishe Mana on Tuesday evening at the opening of Mana Wynwood.
The subject of morality sent Mana into politics. "My message for people who voted for Trump is that winning isn't everything," said the Israeli cultural entrepreneur, who this fall displayed the famed "naked Trump" statues at his Miami and New Jersey projects and offered to donate $1 million to charity if the president-elect would release his tax returns. "How much are we going to compromise our life and our principles? Many times winning is not worth it. The problem is we don't learn."
Jordan Levin

11/29/2016

Night Market at Pao Fuses Culinary with Art Basel

The pop-up market sponsored by Bombay Sapphire merged Asian street food with crafted cocktails for a lantern-lit experience that paid homage to the best of outdoor dining experiences. Chef Paul Qui headlined the affair that featured guest chefs presenting small plates like Korean short ribs and cabbage wraps with cocktails that fused Bombay gin with Earl Grey tea and other innovative mixers like coconut vinegar, chai tea and pineapple syrup. The Night Market at Pao is located at the Faena Hotel at 3201 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. 

image from http://miamiherald.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451b26169e201b7c8b60260970b-pi

By Sara Liss

Art Basel: Scope sticks out tongue at convention

Lynx Alexander, who was working the floor of opening day Scope to drum up support for his campaign to be designated as New York City public art, embodies the funky spirit of this fair, which has been a tent on the sand since moving from Midtown a few years ago.

Alexander works for Steinway & Sons as an ambassador matching music with artworks. He would have needed some Bartok or Shostakovich to match with the sandwich shop installation, giant ashtray or macabre babies on display at the fair.

Kendall Hamersly

IMG_0840.JPG

Bernadette Despujols, 'Love Is No Game,' resin on aluminum, $26,000. At Scope.

Regeneration Series: Anselm Kiefer from the Hall Collection Opening and Dinner at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale




Anselm Keifer and Francesco Clemente

Art patrons in town for Art Basel took a detour last night and headed to Broward for the Regeneration Series: Anselm Kiefer from the Hall Collection opening at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale .



Bruce Weber, Nan Bush and Bonnie Clearwater

Guest included many local, national and international faces including NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Chief Curator and Director Bonnie Clearwater, honored artist Anselm Kiefer, fashion photographer Bruce Weber and wife Nan Bush, artist Jose Bedia, artist George Sanchez-Calderon, David Horowitz, Dr. Stanley and Pearl Goodman, Hugh Bush, Linda and Alex Frost, Francesco and Alba Clemente, artist Samson Kambalu, Andy and Christine Hall, Doug Cramer, Jane Holzer, Kim Heirston, Jay Jopling, Michael Chow, Tom Krens, Mary Boone, David and Linda Frankel, and Francie Bishop Good, Sir Norman Rosenthal, Sandra Muss and Candia Fisher.

​Photos by ​
Manny
​ofMiami.com​

Categories


Archives


Powered by TypePad