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'The Uterati' strikes back: Group responds to news that Dem shushed for saying uterus

News that state Rep. Scott Randolph was scolded for saying the word uterus on the House floor has prompted hundreds of people to go online, and to say the word "uterus."

The story, which the Buzz told you about yesterday, has prompted a series of e-protests, and the creation of a Facebook page for the Uterus (632 fans as of this posting).

In case you missed it: Randolph's wife, Susannah, gave him the idea to use time during a House floor debate to argue that the only way she should could protect her rights as a woman was to "incorporate her uterus," since Republicans are fiercely anti-regulation when it comes to business. Democrats were later told not to talk about body parts on the House floor, because teenage pages were in the chamber.

"My #uterus is starting a PAC and a leadership fund -- U-PAC," Susannah Randolph posted on the Facebook page. "Who's in? Time to bring power back to the uterus."

The story has been picked up by Salon.com, and the woman's pop culture and gossip web site Jezebel. People on Twitter have making fake uterus film titles -- "My Big Fat Greek Uterus," and "The Manchurian Uterus" -- and commenters also have been going to the Florida House of Representatives Facebook page to say "uterus."

"Time to chastise Mr. Speaker (Dean) Cannon. Apparently he voted for a bill back in 2009 with the word 'utero' in it," someone posted on the Uterus Facebook page last night.

State Rep. Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, commented below the post.

"That is crazy! In front of pages? little children...? OMG!"

Comments

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Brian O'Donoghue

• There most certainly two kinds of people in this world: Intelligent free thinking people and Republicans. Where do they want us to be? I think maybe back to the nineteenth century or perhaps maybe to the twelth.

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