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Gov. Scott sticks to his guns, fires back appeal to 'Docs-vs.-Glocks' ruling

Gov. Rick Scott is appealing yet another court ruling, and appears convinced that his interpretation of the Constitution is more valid than that of the federal judge who struck down the so-called “Docs-vs.-Glocks” law, which banned doctors from asking patients about gun ownership in most cases.

The 2011 law, sponsored by Rep. Jason Brodeur, R-Sanford, was pushed by the National Rifle Association and opposed by Florida doctors. The doctors challenged the law in court, and a federal judge in Miami ruled that barring doctors from asking patients about gun ownership violates their First Amendment freedom of speech rights.

Scott is now appealing that ruling, which pits the First Amendment against the Second Amendment.

Here’s the release from Scott’s office.

Tallahassee, Fla. – “The Department of Health today filed an appeal to the federal court decision blocking enforcement of the Firearm Owner’s Privacy Act.  This law was carefully crafted to respect the First Amendment while ensuring a patient’s constitutional right to own or possess a firearm without discrimination.  I signed this legislation into law because I believe it is constitutional and I will continue to defend it.”

It’s the latest in what has become a litigation-swamped administration for Scott. The state is also involved in lawsuits over voting changes, pension reform, drug testing for state workers and welfare recipients, prison privatization, the Affordable Care Act, etc.

Florida has come out on the losing end of many of those challenges, and Scott has been quick to appeal judge’s rulings each time.

A story in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel on Monday showed that Scott’s administration has racked up more than $880,000 in legal bills for the various challenges over the constitutionality of several laws passed in the last two years. 

@ToluseO

Comments

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Redundant

Americans have 80 guns for every 100 citizens. That is the highest percentage in the world including war zones. What are the Guv and NRA afraid the Dr will say? "Be careful." The next law will make it mandatory to own a gun.

whasup

Toluse,

The Governor did not appeal the decision blocking prison privatization. Get your facts and statements aligned with reality.

"Scott has been quick to appeal judge’s rulings each time."

On the docs v. glocks issue, the law should have been restricted to preventing docs and their staff (or researchers in their offices) from recording in databases which patients have guns or were counseled by the doctor about guns.

David Kearns

Of course more than $880,000 of our money was spent for these appeals allegedly for "our" benefit. And let's look at them: fighting the constitution over his urinary fixation; fighting the civil rights legislation for the fair districts amendments to the state constition; fighting to keep high speed rail out of the state; fighting to keep us from receiving money for the Affordable Health Care Act so that more of our indigent economically destitute can apply for Medicaid; fight the state constitution in order to bring us Gulag, Inc. AKA privatized prisons; fighting to keep minorities from voting early; fighting to confound, confuse and intimidate legal citizens 67 percent of whom are of color, off of the rolls of registered voters. All of this being done for our benefit, using our taxpayer funds to do it....TO us.

Redundant

With 80 guns per 100 citizens it seems that gun ownership is a given and that the privacy issue is a red herring. I have never heard of a Dr. asking about gun ownership. Could it be just another example of the NRA flexing its muscle?

Doug

I support Gov. Scott in this matter. It is a violation of patient privacy to demand information which is not related to their health care. There is provision in the law for firearms related health care issues to be discussed with patients. I hope the federal court decision is reversed.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®©

Doug, you spelled "Governor Voldemort" wrong.

(We'd take Governor "Largest Medicare Scammer in History" as a correct answer. Also.)
~

Redundant

Just tell the doctor your guns are not his business (if a doctor would ever ask). He does not have subpoena powers. Why make a special law about doctors asking about gun ownership? It is a free speech issue for the doctor. Should there be criminal penalties for asking a question?

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