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Has sea level risen 9 inches in South Florida since the 1920s? PolitiFact gets answer

Not long after President Barack Obama gave a speech outlining his plan for attacking climate change, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Weston, appeared on Fox News to discuss the future of energy and the environment.

"We’ve had nine inches of sea-level rise since the 1920s," said Wasserman Schultz in the June 28 interview with Tucker Carlson. "What that means is that communities like mine in South Florida and coastal communities all across the country are facing dangerous sea-level rise, which will ultimately cause homes to be under water in just a few short years."

In this item, we won’t analyze her projections for future sea-level rises; such estimates are based on a variety of theoretical models and come with lots of uncertainty attached. However, we did wonder whether Wasserman Schultz was correct about past changes — specifically, whether South Florida has "had nine inches of sea-level rise since the 1920s."

The ruling: Her claim essentially matches the data collected by the National Oceantic and Atmospheric Administration. While there is considerable uncertainty about the future course of sea-level rises, Wasserman Schultz’s estimate of the historical rise appears to be on target.

We rate this claim: True. More here from Louis Jacobson. 

 

 

 

 

Comments

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whasup

Which raises a great unasked question for environmentalists and other Everglades lovers.

If in the long run, the glades are under seawater, why exactly are we spending vast sums of money to preserve and attempt to restore it?

Are we eventually going to build a sea wall around the glades and have what is, in effect, an pond of glades surrounded by ocean?

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