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Trayvon Martin's parents: "President's comments give us greath strength"

The statement from Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin:

 

 
New York, NY – July 19, 2013: We are deeply honored and moved that President Obama took the time to speak publicly and at length about our son, Trayvon. The President’s comments give us great strength at this time. We are thankful for President Obama’s and Michelle’s prayers, and we ask for your prayers as well as we continue to move forward.
We know that the death of our son Trayvon, the trial and the not guilty verdict have been deeply painful and difficult for many people. We know our family has become a conduit for people to talk about race in America and to try and talk about the difficult issues that we need to bring into the light in order to become a better people.
What touches people is that our son, Trayvon Benjamin Martin, could have been their son. President Obama sees himself in Trayvon and identifies with him. This is a beautiful tribute to our boy. 
Trayvon’s life was cut short, but we hope that his legacy will make our communities a better place for generations to come. We applaud the President’s call to action to bring communities together to encourage an open and difficult dialogue. Our family is committed to this dialogue through the work of the Trayvon Martin Foundation. 
We seek a future when a child can walk down the street and not worry that others see him as dangerous because of the color of his skin or the clothes on his back. We seek a future where our children can grow up and become the people God intended them to be.

 

Comments

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Lew from NYC

FINALLY - Obama has finally called for an "honest debate" about the racial problems in America.Does anybody truly believe that our liberally biased media would even allow such a debate?
Its about time that we all admit that many
of our socialist governmental welfare policies instead of helping people just seem to reward negative behavior. A lenient criminal justice
system like in the city of Chicago only results in more crime.And speaking about crime an honest look at Black on Black crime, and the fact that young Black males commit more violent inter-racial crime against other groups than vice versa. That teenage drug and alcohol abuse may have a genetic component but
it cannot remove the fact that personal character, morality, and individual responsibility play just as large a role. That unmarried women
have the right to have children but with that right should come the responsibility to financially and emotionally support them. And that the Black
Community must finally follow and elect leaders who instead of blaming White society for all of their problems address their own
self-destructive behavior like drug, alcohol abuse, DUI driving, criminal gang activity, promiscuity and spread of sexually transmitted
diseases like Aids'. In addition we can no longer ignore the soaring high school dropout rate among Black and Hispanic teenagers living in the inner city that in America insures a future life of poverty. Finally its about
time that the White liberal media start giving as much airtime to intelligent people like Bill Cosby, Colin Powell(who should have been our first Black President)
and economists like Thomas Sowell, and writer historians like Shelby Steel (of PBS/Ken Burns-Civil War fame) instead of charlatans and
prevaricators like Jess Jerk-son and Al Sharp-tongue...

Pat Kelley

Lew; you have made some very good and valid points. My experience as a 60+ white male also tells me that identical behaviors do not bring identical results for people of different races. The drug laws are definitely used against Blacks and Latinos in a much stricter and harsher way than against whites. The constitutional bans against illegal search and seizure have been set aside in the zeal to imprison even casual drug users. Stop a black teenager without reason, find drugs, send him to prison, and you have started a cycle of crime and poverty. You are correct in what you said, Lew, but it doesn't change the fact that the deck is stacked against young Black and Latino men. The debate will continue and it is up to us to keep it honest and not stoop to name calling.

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