Note: This blog's templates will be updated this afternoon to a responsive design bringing it in line with MiamiHerald.com.

At that time, we will also change to the Facebook commenting system. You will need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment.

« Citizens settles 300 disputed sinkhole claims but hundreds more remain | Main | Gov. Rick Scott, legislators want more control over tuition increases in Florida »

Curt Clawson's jobs record: a dead worker, layoffs & Obamacare bailout – but big bucks for the boss

@MarcACaputo

Curt Clawson is campaigning for an open congressional seat as the turnaround jobs-creating candidate in Southwest Florida.

But on the campaign trail and in his ads, Clawson never mentions a former employee, Shawn Boone, who died in a fiery blast in the Hayes Lemmerz automotive plant in Indiana that Clawson's company ran.

“I think the most important thing for people … to realize was that when he [Clawson] was working at Hayes, they shut down a lot of plants that were good jobs,” Boone’s sister, Tammy Miser told The Naples Daily News in a must-read piece.

Beyond Boone’s death and the company’s apparently spotty safety record, the Daily News exposes how the company filed for bankruptcy under Clawson’s leadership.

It shut down factories.

It outsourced jobs.

And it even relied on an Obamacare bailout. Today, Clawson wants to repeal Obamacare.

And Clawson got rich, the Daily News reports:

During his nine years as a top executive for Hayes Lemmerz, the company laid off more than 1,300 workers, shuttered seven plants in the U.S., and taxpayers covered hundreds of millions of dollars in pension and health-care costs shortly before selling to a Brazilian company in 2011, according to filings with industry regulators and media reports.

Over that time, Clawson brought in annual seven-figure incomes, including bonuses. Clawson’s initial base salary comprised 25 percent of his overall compensation.

Clawson’s salary ranged from a low of $1.3 million in 2001 to a peak of $12.3 million in 2003. The salary differences were driven by factors such as bonuses and stock options, according to proxy statements filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Read the piece here

Comments