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2 pro-immigration reform groups praise Curbelo's new DREAM Act

@PatriciaMazzei

New legislation offering legal status to people brought into the country illegally as children has won the praise of a pair of national groups promoting immigration reform.

The Recognizing American Children Act, filed by Miami Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo, has the support of FWD.us, a Silicon Valley organization co-founded by Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg, and of the National Immigration Forum, a conservative immigration advocacy group.

"In a period where the presumptive Republican presidential nominee is calling for the forced mass deportation of every single undocumented immigrant in the United States, we are encouraged that these Congressmen are working in a different and constructive way," FWD.us said Wednesday in a statement.

The National Immigration Forum also applauded the bill's "tone" -- but also noted "shortcomings," such as a shorter eligibility period than the comprehensive reform bill the Senate passed in 2013.

"It is fantastic to see some leadership on immigration among House Republicans," the group's executive director, Ali Noorani, said in a statement. "Despite some room for improvement, this proposal stands favorably next to the messages about mass deportation and walls that have ruled the Republican presidential campaign."

Curbelo's proposal, co-sponsored with Republican Rep. Mike Coffman of Colorado, is the latest version of the so-called DREAM Act, a law that failed in the Senate and prompted President Barack Obama to take executive action to protect some young immigrants from deportation. Both Curbelo and Coffman are running for re-election in swing districts this fall.

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