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Alan Grayson's personal wealth shrunk last year

@MichaelAuslen

U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson saw his personal wealth diminish significantly last year, but he’s still a multimillionaire, according to financial documents released Tuesday.

At the end of 2015, Grayson, an Orlando Democrat who is running for the U.S. Senate, was worth between $2.6 million and $37.2 million, according to a required financial disclosure.

That’s a decrease from 2014, when Grayson reported a net worth of $13.9 million to $104.8 million.

He has a stake in 56 businesses or other holdings. His only debts are mortgages on two homes worth between $1.5 million and $6 million. In 2015, he earned between $640,000 and $4.5 million in dividends, interest and capital gains from his investments, in addition to his congressional salary of $174,000.

Congressional financial disclosures are notoriously vague, requiring candidates and legislators to report their assets, liabilities and income in broad ranges.

Generally, the disclosures are due in May. However, Grayson requested an extension that pushed his deadline to early last week. It took until Tuesday for the form — 34 pages, filled out by hand — to be available from the U.S. House of Representatives.

Grayson says he took the extension because his finances are “more complicated than other people's. Mine are 40 pages, most people's are five.”

He is running in the Aug. 30 Democratic Senate primary against U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy and labor attorney Pam Keith.

Grayson’s finances have been the subject of controversy in the past.

He was investigated by the Office of Congressional Ethics over allegations that he used his position and once-offshore hedge funds to make money. The ethics office referred the case to the House Ethics Committee, where it remains open.

Grayson contends the office’s findings were false and says the case is essentially over because the ethics committee did not appoint a subcommittee in the case.

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