Note: This blog's templates will be updated this afternoon to a responsive design bringing it in line with MiamiHerald.com.

At that time, we will also change to the Facebook commenting system. You will need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment.

« Rubio supports proposed investigation into alleged Russian meddling in election | Main | Sorry, Miami: Trump's victory tour heads to Orlando instead »

Ugly rift opens among once-united Cuban Americans over push to partner with Castro regime

AP_486433355348

@PatriciaMazzei

An alliance of powerful anti-embargo Cuban-American businessmen frayed earlier this year after its prominent chairman, former U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, returned from Cuba with a simple request: work more closely with Raúl Castro’s communist government.

Behind Gutierrez’s ask was an indication that the Cuban government was eager to negotiate directly with major American corporations — and less enthused by U.S. efforts to assist small-time entrepreneurs on the island.

Gutierrez’s idea riled some members of the U.S.-Cuba Business Council, a group launched last year by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — a key U.S.-Cuba player — to forge economic and trade relationships between the once-estranged countries. Gutierrez’s detractors questioned the wisdom of aligning the council so firmly with the interests of the Cuban government and of big corporations — at the expense, they feared, of the Cuban people.

The tense disagreement exploded in a conference call over the summer among the council’s board members, who in some cases lashed out at each other using harsh language, several people on the call told the Miami Herald. In the end, three Cuban Americans on the board — Vice-Chairman Mike Fernández, Joe Arriola and John McIntire — quit.

“There was a big fallout,” acknowledged Arriola, the Miami-Dade County Public Health Trust chairman. “Carlos was very much into bringing businesses to partner with the Cuban government, and we were not. We decided to get out. There is nothing wrong with it — we just didn’t agree with it.”

Arriola declined to describe the contentious conference call in detail, saying only: “It was just too many Cubans together.”

More here.

Photo credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Comments