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Florida colleges: Funding cuts to us - amid favor to universities - is 'demoralizing'

Galvano 2015@ByKristenMClark

As Senate President Joe Negron aims to make Florida’s 12 public universities “elite” destinations, state lawmakers this spring voted to give an extra $232 million next year to those institutions — while simultaneously cutting $25 million that has helped the state’s 28 state colleges serve students who are most in need.

The stark difference in funding priorities was received as a decisive insult to institutions like Miami Dade College and Broward College — and the tens of thousands of students they serve: That they don’t matter as much as the universities.

“That, I think, is what is the most demoralizing part of the conversation. ... we’re disinvesting in them,” MDC Executive Vice President and Provost Lenore Rodicio said in reference to the 800,000 students served by the Florida College System. “This population of students, in a sense, don’t count as much as students who are more elite, more high performing.”

Bill Galvano, a top Senate Republican who helped craft the 2017-18 higher education budget, said there’s a longer term plan to help the colleges, too, and that any inference by the colleges of a sleight is “short-sighted.”

But with Negron, R-Stuart, laser-focused this year on the universities first and foremost, administrators at state colleges feel those efforts came at their students’ expense — especially when the state banked $1 billion in reserve spending it could have tapped to, at least, keep the college system’s funding level.

“When we had record windfall of money for the state budget, we [the colleges] appear to be about the only place that got cuts,” Broward College President J. David Armstrong said. “It’s bad for Florida’s future. It sends a message to Floridians that perpetuates social and economic inequities.”

Full story here.

Photo credit: Sen. Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton. AP

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