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Rubio on DACA: 'The president will have to lead'

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@PatriciaMazzei

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio urged President Donald Trump on Tuesday to tell lawmakers what legislation he’d be willing to sign to allow to immigrants brought into the country illegally as children to stay, now that his administration has decided to wind down the executive program that protected them from deportation.

“Congress has to act,” Rubio said in an interview with the Miami Herald. “But on this matter, the White House and the president will have to lead.”

In his first public remarks about the end of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, the Republican senator said he’s been reassured in private conversations with the White House that Trump wants Congress to help the so-called “Dreamers” — and not just let their work permits and deportation protection expire.

“This is not something he really wants to do,” Rubio said of Trump. “He kind of finds himself in a situation, from a constitutional and legal perspective, where he has to address it.”

Rubio argued DACA, challenged in court by attorneys general from 10 states, would likely have been ruled unconstitutional in a few months and left the nearly 800,000 people who have benefited from the program immediately unprotected. When U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that DACA would be rescinded, he included a six-month wind-down period gives Congress room to legislate. 

“The idea that we could have somehow continued it in perpetuity isn’t true. It’s on very shaky constitutional ground,” Rubio said. “There were some advocating for its immediate cancellation. The only reason to put the six-month period in place is to give Congress to opportunity to address this.”

More here.

Photo credit: Joe Raedle, Getty Images

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