April 08, 2015

Poll in Cuba: President Obama more popular than Raul and Fidel Castro

via @glenngarvin

President Barack Obama is more popular among Cubans than either of the Castro brothers who have ruled the island for the past five and a half decades, according to a new poll secretly conducted there last month.

Eighty percent of the Cubans polled said they had a “very positive” or “somewhat positive” opinion of Obama, while just 17 percent registered a “very negative” or “somewhat negative” impression.

The widespread approval of the U.S. president was in sharp contrast to the mostly adverse opinions of Cuban leader Raul Castro (48 percent negative, 47 percent postive) and his retired older brother Fidel (50 percent negative, 44 percent positive).

Obama’s popularity — exceeded by only that of Pope Francis — was perhaps the most startling finding of the poll, which was conducted by the Miami company Bendixen & Amandi International for the TV networks Univision and Fusion and the Washington Post.

The survey is the first nationwide opinion poll conducted in Cuba by a private firm since the country turned communist. Without the Cuban government’s knowledge or permission, the pollsters conducted face-to-face interviews with 1,200 adults throughout the island between March 6 and 16. The poll has a plus-or-minus 2.8 percent margin of error.

More here.

April 01, 2015

Quinnipiac poll: President Obama's job approval dips in Florida


Florida voters continued to give President Obama negative marks in a new public-opinion poll that has also found most respondents favor some sort of deal on Iran's nuclear program.

Obama's popularity, known as his job-approval rating, is 41 percent in Florida, with 55 percent disapproving of the Democratic president, according to the survey by Quinnipiac University published Wednesday. Last time the organization asked that question, in February, Obama was doing slightly better, with 46 percent approval and 49 percent disapproval.

The latest poll, which has an error margin of 3 percentage points, also found that 61 percent of Florida respondents would like to change direction from Obama's policies, compared to 32 percent who would like to continue them.

"President Barack Obama gets lousy grades for his job performance, although they are not quite as low as they have been at times in his second term," Peter A. Brown, the poll's assistant director, said in a statement. "More damning is that about five in eight voters say they want the new president to take the country in a different direction."

Despite their disapproval of Obama, Florida voters said -- by 63-26 percent -- that they would back an agreement with Iran to lift sanctions against the country in return for restrictions on its nuclear program. The Obama administration is in negotiations that have stretched past a self-imposed March 31 deadline.

Last month, 47 Republican U.S. senators sent Iranian leaders a letter warning that a deal with Obama might not be backed by the GOP-controlled Congress. Wednesday's poll found a majority of Florida voters found the letter to be unhelpful, by 55-38 percent (that's a wider negative margin than Obama's approval rating). The split was largely partisan, with Democrats and independents in opposition and Republicans in support.

Still, half of Florida voters opined the letter won't have an impact on the White House's efforts, and they support, by 65-23 percent, legislation making any Iran deal subject to congressional approval.

March 20, 2015

Obamacare turns 5: What came true and what didn't

Predictions about the health care law were a dime a dozen back in 2010. Supporters contended that virtually everyone around the country would soon have access to affordable insurance. Opponents said the law would cost a fortune by adding to the national debt and killing jobs.

Actually, none of those things have happened.

As the Affordable Care Act makes its way to its fifth anniversary on Monday, the law has taken twists and turns, moving off course from where everyone thought it would be.

Once expected to insure 32 million new Americans by the end of the decade, the projected target has been downgraded to 27 million — far from the universal coverage many proponents hoped for.

Unforeseen developments, like significant changes in health cost trends and a sweeping Supreme Court decision on Medicaid expansion, have meant the insurance provisions in the law will cost $139 billion less over the next five years than it was supposed to back in 2010. That has quieted some critics who expected massive, deficit-inflating costs.

In five years, the law has steadily navigated toward its overall goal of decreasing the number of uninsured Americans, without dramatically disrupting the overall health care industry, for better or worse. Yet.

"The whole thing has been in much slower motion that what was predicted," said Michael Tanner, health care analyst with the libertarian Cato Institute. "Whether you thought something good was going to happen or something bad, you sort of thought it would have happened by now. Instead, it’s just been creeping along."

For the rest of the article by Angie Drobnic Holan and Steve Contorno, check out PolitiFact.

March 13, 2015

March 06, 2015

As Obama and nation mark 50th anniversary of Selma's Bloody Sunday, a look back at voting rights fact-checks

This week marks the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" -- the day police beat voting-rights activists as they attempted to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala.

President Barack Obama, former President George W. Bush and nearly one-fifth of Congress will be in Selma this weekend to mark the anniversary.

On March 7, 1965, hundreds of peaceful protesters set out to march for voting rights. But as depicted in the movie Selma released earlier this year, police met them on the Edmund Pettus Bridge and attacked them with clubs, whips and tear gas. Selma became a turning point in the civil rights movement, leading to the passage of the Voting Rights Act just five months later under President Lyndon B. Johnson. The law was designed to prevent the denial of voting rights based on race.

In recent years, PolitiFact has fact-checked a wide variety of claims on voting rights, including statements made by Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, as well as by politicians including Gov. Rick Scott. Here’s a look at some of our fact-checks from PolitiFact Florida.

February 26, 2015

Obama commemorates 3rd anniversary of Trayvon Martin's death


President Obama used part of his remarks in a reception Thursday honoring African American History month to remember Trayvon Martin, the Miami Gardens teenager killed three years ago in Sanford.

"Today, on the third anniversary of Trayvon Martin's death, showing all of our kids -- all of them -- every single day, that their lives matter -- that's part of our task," the president said, according to a White House transcript. "I want to thank Trayvon's parents for being here on what's a very difficult day for them." 

Trayvon's parents were in the White House East Room for the event. The man who shot the unarmed 17-year-old, George Zimmerman, was acquitted by a jury. The U.S. Justice Department announced this week that it would not charge Zimmerman with a federal hate crime.

The boy's death set off a national debate on racial profiling and self-defense laws.

February 25, 2015

Jeb Bush name-dropped in Obama town hall


Only one potential 2016 presidential candidate -- Jeb Bush -- was named at a town hall-style meeting on immigration held in Miami on Wednesday with President Obama.

Moderator José Díaz-Balart cited a statement the former Florida governor made on Facebook after a Texas federal judge temporarily halted Obama's latest executive action on immigration.

"He said last week that you overstepped your authority, and as a consequence you hurt the effort to find a solution to the immigration problem, and all the affected families deserve something better," Díaz-Balart began before asking about Obama's message to his successor.

The president gave a lengthy answer that, at one point, addressed the Bush remark, and received a round of applause.

"I appreciate Mr. Bush being concerned about immigration reform," Obama said. "I would suggest that what he do is talk to the speaker of the House and the members of his party. Because the fact of the matter is that even after we passed bipartisan legislation in the Senate, I gave the Republicans a year and a half -- a year and a half -- to just call the bill. We had the votes. They wouldn't do it."

There was no mention that the bipartisan legislation in question was pushed in part by another possible GOP presidential candidate, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

That time Obama made fun of a TV anchor's dye job


Nothing drew more laughter during President Obama's brief visit to Miami on Wednesday than when he made a playful jab at Telemundo and MSNBC anchor José Díaz-Balart.

The quick exchange happened at the end of an hour-long interview about immigration that Díaz-Balart conducted in English and Spanish at Florida International University. Obama was calling on young people to vote.

"It doesn't do any good to push candidates but not then back it up with action," Obama said. "And the action ultimately is going to be getting engaged and involved in the political process. The people who are least likely to vote are young people."

Then he turned to Díaz-Balart and said, "I'm going to include José in the category of being old."

"We're the same age," Díaz-Balart chimed in. "I just look a little younger..."

"He looks a little better," Obama added, pointing at his own graying head, "because, you know, I don't dye my hair."

"I know," Díaz-Balart responded with a smile. "It's called, 'The Obama.'"

The two men shook hands good-naturedly. "I'm exaggerating," Obama said.

Immigration reform will happen, Obama says in Miami: 'There will be a President Rodriguez'


Likening immigration reform to the great civil-rights movements in U.S. history, President Barack Obama vowed during a brief visit to Miami on Wednesday to veto any legislation undoing his executive order protecting from deportation up to 5 million people who are in the country illegally.

“In the short term, if Mr. [Mitch] McConnell, the leader of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House, John Boehner, want to have a vote on whether what I’m doing is legal or not, they can have that vote,” Obama said, almost daring congressional leaders to challenge him. “I will veto that vote, because I’m absolutely confident that what we’re doing is the right thing to do.”

His veto threat was met with rousing applause from the friendly audience assembled at Florida International University, where Obama taped an hour-long town hall-style meeting hosted by Miami-based Telemundo and sister network MSNBC. The event, moderated by bilingual anchor José Díaz-Balart, was later nationally televised on both networks.

McConnell, of Kentucky, wants a stand-alone bill blocking Obama’s 2014 actions, which were supposed to take effect this week but have been stalled by a Texas federal judge. Boehner, of Ohio, is waiting for the Senate’s move, after House Republicans passed a budget for the Homeland Security Department that wouldn’t pay for the president’s plan.

More here.

January 20, 2015

Fact-checking the 2015 State of the Union

On Tuesday night, President Barack Obama will visit the U.S. Capitol building to present his views on the State of the Union. Afterward, Republicans have put forward U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, to give a response and U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Miami, will give the Spanish translation.

PolitiFact will be there to check the facts.

For 2015, we’ve staffed up and added new technology to our toolkit. We plan on live blogging the speeches here on our website via ScribbleLive with fact-checks, rulings and analysis as the night goes on. We’re partnering with Genius to annotate the speeches to provide important context and vetted, independent sources of information. And when our work is done in the early morning hours, we’ll send a priority email to our Kickstarter supporters to let them know.

Read more from editors Angie Drobnic Holan and Aaron Sharockman.