September 12, 2013

With $845 million surplus, Negron makes another bid for auto registration fee cut

As Gov. Rick Scott was on the road Thursday in Tampa promoting his proposal to cut $500 million in unspecified taxes and fees, the lawmakers who will actually vote on next year’s budget huddled during a conference call in Tallahassee.

A joint panel of House and Senate members discussed a projected $845 million surplus in the budget that covers spending from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. Compared to the surplus of $71.3 million this year, it might sound like it’s time for a spending spree.

But hold on. As chief state economist Amy Baker told the Legislative Budget Commission on Thursday, more than half of the extra money is in one-time revenue. Spend it once, and it’s not going to be available the following year. So it might be a good idea not to spend that money on recurring expenses like salaries. (Baker said if lawmakers spent the entire surplus on recurring expenses, the budget would face a deficit of $264.7 million the following year).

Tax cuts certainly qualify as a dreaded recurring expense. So it’ll be interesting to see what Scott decides to propose. But already, Senate Appropriations Chair Joe Negron, R-Stuart, has staked a claim, once again, to reduce vehicle registration fee increases that lawmakers approved in 2009 by $230 million. He filed a SB 156 on Thursday that does just that.

Negron pushed for the same this year only to see the bill die. That effort would have paid for the fee reduction by eliminating a 15 percent tax credit for the insurance industry that was created in 1987 and was called outdated by Negron.

Negron’s new bill appropriates only general revenue for the cut. But he told reporters after the meeting that he wants to explore eliminating tax incentive programs that have “outlived their usefulness” to help pay for it. He said there are dozens of tax incentives that they'll be looking at.

“If we’re going to do several hundred million in fee and tax relief, I hope this one (vehicle registration fees) can make it to the top of the list,” Negron said. “It was an almost doubling of tag registration fees in 2009, and based on the input that I have gotten from my constituents, it’s one that affects them the most directly.”

Negron’s bill certainly has the support from Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville.

“I’m glad we’re giving tax breaks to businesses,” Gaetz said. “I was all for them. But it’s past time we help hard-working middle class families.”

Task force takes shape to study mandatory paid-sick-leave

UPDATE: House Speaker Will Weatherford sent over his list of appointees to the task force.

  • -Florida State University economics professor Randall Holcombe, filling the slot set aside for a business economist.
  • -Rep. John Wood, R-Winter Haven.
  • -Walter Carpenter, an Orlando real estate appraiser representing Florida business owners with less than 50 employees.
  • -Gregory Riehle of Wesley Chapel, the owner of Saddlebrook Resorts representing Florida business owners with more than 50 employees.
  • -Marcia Gonzalez, Political Director of the Florida Carpenters Regional Council, a labor union.

ORIGINAL POST:

Senate President Don Gaetz has announced the first four members of a task force that will study how state law affects the benefits companies can offer employees. The group will eventually grow to 11 people to bring recommendations to the Legislature next year in hopes of creating one statewide standard regarding mandatory paid-sick-leave.

Earlier this year, Gov. Rick Scott signed House 655 into law a bill, which temporarily banned cities and counties from requiring local employers to offer paid-sick-leave. Companies like Disney and Darden Restaurants, as well as the Florida Chamber of Commerce, argued the ban was needed to avoid having to deal with a patchwork of different rules.

The outcome of the law was to block efforts pushed by liberal organizations and labor unions in Orange County to enact mandatory paid-sick-time there. The issue was scheduled to be included on the county's ballot in August 2014 after supporters collected 50,000 signatures to trigger the referendum.

Gaetz, who says his fifth pick will be a doctor, and House Speaker Will Weatherford will appoint a total of 10 people to the task force. The president of Workforce Florida, Chris Hart, will serve as the 11th member and chairman.

Here is the full press release from Gaetz: 

Continue reading "Task force takes shape to study mandatory paid-sick-leave" »

September 10, 2013

Change coming to budget offices of Scott, Senate

Change is coming to the budget offices of Gov. Rick Scott and Senate President Don Gaetz, with a historical twist. It's believed to be the first time in state government history that women will hold all three key staff budget positions in the executive and legislative branches in Tallahassee.

With the long-awaited retirement of Scott's budget director, Jerry McDaniel, at year's end, Scott has chosen an experienced hand: Cynthia Kelly, a former staff director for both the Senate and House budget offices. Kelly has been director of administrative services for the Department of Environmental Protection since 2010. She previously worked in the governor's budget office in the 1990s when Democrat Lawton Chiles was in office.

Sen. Gaetz has promoted Cindy Kynoch to be staff director of the Senate Appropriations Committee replacing Mike Hansen, effective Oct. 21, at a salary of $140,000 a year. Kynoch had been Hansen's top deputy. And JoAnne Leznoff continues to hold down the fort in the House as the long-time staff director of the House Appropriations Committee.

-- Steve Bousquet

September 04, 2013

Matt Gaetz urges tea party to fight for Stand Your Ground

The Republican leaders of the Legislature don’t want to change Florida's Stand Your Ground law. Polls show that a majority of voters agree. But that doesn’t mean conservatives should stand back as lawmakers prepare for hearings on the self-defense law, Rep. Matt Gaetz told tea party activists Tuesday night.

During a 90-minute conference call, Gaetz said the tea party needed to show up in Tallahassee in big numbers to offset proponents of changing the law, who have vowed to do the same. Gaetz also listened to the callers' ideas about what else can be done leading up to the yet-to-be-scheduled hearings, such as circulating petitions and lobbying local elected officials.

House Speaker Will Weatherford called for the hearings after activists and Democrats said the issue needed more attention after the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the death of Trayvon Martin. But he assigned the task of chairing the hearings to Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, chairman of the House’s Criminal Justice Subcommittee and a vocal proponent of the law without “changing one damn comma.” 

Even though he doesn’t think there should or will be changes to Stand Your Ground, Gaetz said the hearings will be beneficial.

“These hearings will give a great opportunity, I think, for the people of Florida to see what the Stand Your Ground law really does,” he said. “Why it was enacted. Who it protects. Who it doesn’t protect.”

A general disdain for the Dream Defenders’ 30-night sit-in at the Capitol to push for changes to Stand Your Ground after the Zimmerman trial was a common theme of the phone call. Gaetz defended the activists' right to protest but said he wasn’t happy about the expense to the state and other things he heard.

He also claimed most of the activists, including those who planned to return for the hearings, were paid for their time and/or bused in from other states.

Continue reading "Matt Gaetz urges tea party to fight for Stand Your Ground" »

September 02, 2013

Gaetz's top aide puts new twist on the revolving door with $400k consulting job

Senate President Don Gaetz’s right-hand man has been running his own political consulting firm, allowing him indirectly to rake in more than $400,000 from the some of the same special interests that have a stake in influencing legislation. Full story here.

For three years ending in 2012, Chris Clark, 41, took a leave of absence from his state job after the legislative session ended in May and went to work as Gaetz’s campaign manager. Clark formed the company in 2009.

The lucrative arrangement Clark has carved out for himself underscores the web of financial ties special interests have with the Florida Legislature as staff often cycle in and out of government and the private sector, developing relationships with the very lobbyists who have a financial stake in influencing them.

“It’s a practice that Democrats and Republicans have used without any serious problem that I’m aware of,’’ said Gaetz, R-Niceville, in defending Clark, who saw no conflict with the arrangement.

Clark’s dual role as campaign consultant and legislative staff member is allowed by law as long as he doesn’t work on the campaign while on the state job.

Still, Clark’s consulting deals stand out for two reasons: the sheer size of the raw dollar amounts and the fact that Gaetz made a show of standing against special interest money by leading a charge to abolish some of the very political committees that helped fund his chief of staff.

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August 22, 2013

Former speaker Bense to oversee oil spill trust fund

Senate President Don Gaetz insisted on setting up a trust fund to ensure that any proceeds Florida receives from lawsuits or settlements related to the BP oil spill goes to affected counties. Today, he announced that former House Speaker Allan Bense will chair the board of this endowment fund, known as Triumph Gulf Coast, Inc.

From the press  release:

Former House Speaker Allan Bense was appointed today to the Board of Trustees of Triumph Gulf Coast, Inc., an endowment established by the Florida Legislature to manage fine and settlement dollars coming to the state as a result of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

Bense (R-Panama City) was selected by Senate President Don Gaetz who, along with the Governor and House Speaker, chose the five person board. Bense represented portions of Franklin, Gulf and Bay counties in the House of Representatives from 1998 to 2006. During his final two years, he was Speaker of the House. 

“Allan Bense is a lifelong champion and passionate steward of the natural and human resources of the Northwest Florida Gulf Coast,” Gaetz said, in making the appointment. “He built successful companies from the ground up, meets payrolls every week, and intimately understands the economy and people of our area. As a business and political leader he has always cared more about the next generation than the next election.”

Triumph Gulf Coast was created to ensure that funds coming to the state as a result of lawsuits or settlements with British Petroleum, Halliburton or others found culpable in the 2010 oil spill would not be wasted or spent quickly. The five member board, assisted by professional financial managers, will be accountable to invest and use the proceeds and principal over the course of thirty years to promote job creation through lasting economic development in the eight coastal counties of Northwest Florida, stretching from Escambia through Wakulla counties.

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August 20, 2013

Rep. Castor asks GOP leaders to reinstate approval of insurance rates

Republican lawmakers are standing by their decision to suspend for two years the state's ability to regulate health insurance rates. But that hasn't stopped U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor from witing a letter to Senate President Don Gaetz and House Speaker Will Weatherford asking them to reverse course.

Castor, D-Tampa, said that some lawmakers and even Gov. Rick Scott may have been misinformed when they supported Senate Bill 1842, assuming the federal government had the power to negotiate insurance rates. She says the lack of state oversight could cause premiums to be higher in Florida than they would otherwise under the health care law.

"This appears to be a cynical attempt to saddle Florida consumers with higher insurance rates simply to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and the new health insurance marketplace where Floridians and small businesses can shop and compare new health plans," Castor wrote.

The Legislature would have to call a special session in order to approve any new laws prior to the launch of the health exchange on Oct. 1. But again, with Republican leaders saying there is nothing wrong with the changes in Senate Bill 1842, that is unlikely to occur.

Click here to download Castor letter on insurance regulations.

August 12, 2013

Movers & Shakers

New chairman for Citizens Board of Governors

Chris Gardner, a veteran of the retail insurance brokerage business, has been named chairman of the Board of Governors for Citizens Property Insurance Corp.by Florida CFO Jeff Atwater.

Gardner, a resident of Winter Park, has 20 years of experience in the retail insurance brokerage business with a specific focus in commercial property and casualty insurance. He has served as a member of the Citizens board since his appointment in July 2011.

“In his 20 years in the insurance industry, Chris has proved himself to be a person of high character and sound judgment who shares my high expectations for how a corporation such as Citizens should be managed,” Atwater said in a news release.

Gardner is the managing shareholder of Kuykendall Gardner, LLC, a Florida-based insurance broker doing business since 1953. Neither the firm collectively nor Gardner personally has any current business interests in Citizens, according to the release. He has been a past chairman of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and is a past vice chairman of the City of Orlando Municipal Planning Board.

Gardner succeeds Carlos Lacasa as chairman of the Citizen’s board.

Another change: Sen. President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, has appointed Freddie Schinz to the Citizens Board of Governors.

Schinz has more than 40 years of experience as a statewide commercial builder. He replaces Carol Everhart.

Gaetz picks

Gaetz has appointed Sen. Anitere Flores (R-Miami) to the Southern States Energy Board, Sen. John Legg (R-Lutz) to the Education Commission of the States, Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) to the Workforce Florida, Inc., Board of Directors, and Sen. Kelli Stargel (R-Lakeland) to the Florida High School Athletic Association Public Liaison Advisory Committee.

Flores, 36, is an attorney and CEO of Doral College. Legg, 38, is a long-time Pasco County educator and the Senate Education Committee Chair. Montford, 65, is the CEO of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. Stargel, 47, is an investment property manager in Lakeland.

Continue reading "Movers & Shakers" »

July 24, 2013

Residency of all legislators under review

From the News Service of Florida

Legislative leadership wants to know where House and Senate members are when they say they're at home.

With Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, raising questions about a number of Democratic lawmakers living outside the districts they represent, the top attorneys for the House and Senate have been directed to recommend standards for residency.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Ken Detzner will be asked to get a list of where all 160 legislators are registered to vote.

"Neither the House nor the Senate has historically developed a clear set of principles to determine the residency of our members," House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, said in letter Wednesday to Latvala. "The recommended guidelines should draw on any past rulings of the House and Senate on this question, as well as decisions from other bodies in related legal contexts."

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June 24, 2013

Gov. Scott signs 'landmark' foster care legislation

Gov. Rick Scott signed the Nancy C. Detert Common Sense and Compassion Independent Living Act Monday -- for the second time.

Scott initially signed HB 1036, which gives kids the option of staying in foster care until age 21, on June 14th, but Monday's ceremonial signing gave supporters a chance to celebrate a bill advocates call "landmark legislation." 

"This is the most important bill the governor will have signed all year. It immediately impacts the lives of thousands of children and I don't see a bill that's more important than that," said Senate sponsor Detert, who attended the signing at Valencia College in Orlando with House sponsor, Rep. Keith Perry, R-Gainesville, Department of Children and Families Secretary David Wilkins, Florida's Advocate for Foster and Adoption Tanya Wilkins, children's advocates and current and foster care youths from all over Florida.

Along with giving young adults the option of staying in foster care, the new law requires a transition plan be made for those who are leaving the child welfare system. 

“This new law will ensure kids entrusted in our care have the best start possible into adulthood and provide them the opportunity to obtain the life skills necessary so they may live the American Dream,” Scott said.

About 70 percent of teens in foster care have not graduated high school or received their GED by the time they "age out" of the system.

Continue reading "Gov. Scott signs 'landmark' foster care legislation" »