October 22, 2014

'We've got to get our votes out,' Rick Scott tells Republicans in Doral

@PatriciaMazzei

Florida Gov. Rick Scott's campaign bus rolled Wednesday morning into Doral, the Hispanic-dominated industrial center of Miami-Dade that also houses the county's elections headquarters. The bus parked across the street at an Anthony's Coal Fired Pizza restaurant, where Scott and running mate Carlos Lopez-Cantera touted the governor's Tuesday night debate performance.

"Charlie Crist, I could not believe what he said last night," Lopez-Cantera said. "He admitted that he was no good at being governor."

The Republicans also stressed the GOP's lead in the number of early ballots cast so far.

"We're doing unbelievably on absentee ballots," Scott said. "Historically, Republicans didn't get out in early voting… We've got to get our votes out."

Lopez-Cantera said he was overwhelmed with emotion when he cast his ballot Monday, because when he started in politics, he told former Gov. Jeb Bush that he'd never be on a statewide ballot "because I have a hyphenated last name."

"My eyes watered" at the ballot booth, Lopez-Cantera said, choking back tears. "I just wish my grandfather was here today to see this."

Scott fielded a few questions from reporters but, like in the debate, wouldn't say whether he supports a pathway to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally.

"Everything will be on the table" with comprehensive reform, Scott said. "But you don't do things piecemeal. Things shouldn't be left to the states, to have to decide on these things."

Scott unsuccessfully backed an Arizona-style crackdown bill in 2011.

Before hopping back on the bus, Doral police officers stopped traffic on Northwest 87th Avenue to allow Scott to cross the street to the elections department, where his supporters had the option to vote.

August 21, 2014

DNC chair Wasserman Schultz bucks lame-duck Obama on deporting unaccompanied minors

@MarcACaputo

It's August, and in Washington Democratic insider circles that usually means some anonymous person from Obama World would have something nasty to say about Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Weston's congresswoman.

But the third time wasn't the charm.

And last night it looked like Wasserman Schultz was ready to put some daylight between her and President Obama over a most-sensitive topic: the unaccompanied minors who flooded the border.

Here's Politico:

Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz also thinks deporting children detained at the border is sending them back to “certain death.”

The White House went apoplectic last month when likely 2016 presidential candidate Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley said, “We are not a country that should turn children away and send them back to certain death.” Tuesday night, Wasserman Schultz said twice — strongly — that she thinks O’Malley was right.

“As you know, Gov. O’Malley said that to send them back would be to send them to certain death. Do you agree with him?” Fusion’s Jorge Ramos asked in an interview.

“Not only do I agree with him, but,” the Florida congresswoman said, launching into a long story about a boy she’d met during a visit to a facility in Miami who told her of being kidnapped and forced into the drug trade, and showed her a bullet wound through the back of his arm.....

“That was the first she was hearing about Martin O’Malley,” said Wasserman Schultz’s congressional office communications director Sean Bartlett. “She was reacting to Jorge’s question and thinking about the tour she had just come from.”

Putting aside the potential political calculus of courting Hispanics or firing up liberals or simply saying something heartfel, maybe it's just a coincidence that Wasserman Schultz happened to say this now.

But regardless, the lame-duckness of President Obama is looking lamer and lamer.

August 01, 2014

On House floor, Joe Garcia calls Ted Cruz's immigration moves 'un-American'

@PatriciaMazzei

Congressman Joe Garcia, a Miami Democrat, gave an impassioned speech on the U.S. House of Representatives floor Friday lambasting Republicans -- and specifically Senator Ted Cruz of Texas -- for failing to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

Garcia didn't mention Cruz by name. But he railed against "a fellow Cuban American that sits in the other house" for "dictating to this house that we should strip away rights -- strip away rights from children."

"It's un-American," Garcia said, to applause inside the chambers.

The House extended its session to try to pass a child immigration bill before its summer recess. A day earlier, House Republicans met with Cruz, a conservative tea-party favorite, who said the legislation didn't go far enough.

 

July 30, 2014

Marco Rubio votes to move Senate border bill, but vows to oppose it without new reforms

From a press release:

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) today issued the following statement regarding his vote to debate the Senate border bill:

“Today, I voted to move to the Senate border bill so that we would have the opportunity to vote on and pass amendments that would achieve real reforms on border security, end the DACA program for new applicants and reform the 2008 law that allows unaccompanied minors who enter the U.S. illegally to be released.

“If these types of reforms are not included in the bill, I will vote to deny the Democrats the 60 votes they will need to pass this bill. Furthermore, as I have previously stated, I will oppose any efforts to add the 2013 Senate bill or the DREAM Act to this legislation. This legislation needs to address the current humanitarian crisis on our southern border, and prevent any future mass migrations.”

 

 

June 10, 2014

With Eric Cantor's shocking defeat, immigration reform all but dies in US House this year

@MarcACaputo

The No. 2 Republican in the U.S. House is a goner.

And amid the ashes of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s shocking defeat Tuesday night, comprehensive immigration reform smolders.

This is not to say that immigration reform would have passed this year if the Virginia Republican had not been the first House majority leader to lose since 1899. Immigration reform was already endangered in 2014.

But Cantor’s defeat to tea partyer David Brat was so intertwined with immigration — “amnesty” and “illegal aliens” — that the few fence-sitters in the GOP-led House are going to flock back to the politically right side of the divide.

Regardless of polls showing comprehensive immigration reform is popular nationwide and even in Cantor’s district, Brat’s win and Cantor’s loss is now a powerful symbol, a rallying cry.

That matters in politics.

“Is it absolutely devastating? I don’t know,” said U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, a Miami Republican who for years has tried to get his party to tackle the issue.

Full story here

May 20, 2014

Joe Garcia gets in America Rising's crosshairs (again) with 'Communism works' line

@MarcACaputo

Beware, Joe Garcia, America Rising PAC is watching.

When the Democratic Miami Congressman appeared to eat earwax during a committee hearing (he didn't, he says), the political action committee was quick to catch it and post the video.

A week has gone by. The YouTube video has 2.5 million hits. And now America Rising is highlighting what came out of Garcia's mouth tonight during a Google Hangout about immigration.

"We’ve proved that Communism works," Garcia said, chiding Republicans for backing big spending on border security that creates loads of government jobs.

So Garcia said much more than these five words. But we're talking campaign season here. Little snippets like that make for good attack ads and mailers. 

"This is an absurdity, accusing the son of Cuban immigrants of believing in Communism is just ridiculous," said Garcia, a freshman who sits in one of the state's most-competitive seats and therefore faces a horde of Republican challengers.

When asked if he could have phrased the line better, Garcia said there's no point: "They would post the video anyway.... I'll continue to say it."

America Rising sure hopes so. Here's his whole hangout riff:

 “When you attract people, you are the dominant culture that people want to emulate and copy what you’re doing because it works. And in America, we are doing a huge disservice to ourselves by not understanding how powerful of a driver in the economy an immigration system that works can be -- and continues to be -- and by not having an immigration system that works. Let me give you an example, the kind of money we’ve poured in: So the most dangerous—sorry, the safest city in America is El Paso, Texas. It happens to be across the border from the most dangerous city in the Americas, which is Juarez. Right? And two of the safest cities in America, two of them are on the border with Mexico. And of course, the reason is we’ve proved that Communism works. If you give everybody a good, government job, there’s no crime. But that isn’t what we should be doing on the border. The kind of money we’ve poured into it, and we’re having diminishing returns. So while we’re doing—we’re spending all of this money here, we have border problems in Puerto Rico. We haven’t been able to set up a system that’s safe there. People are finding alternative routes. The opportunity to get this right and the mistake that Republicans make -- and I say Republicans because it’s Republicans right now -- I’m known to say that Democrats were also possessed by Xenophobia in 2008 and particularly after 9/11 and the economic crisis, but today we’re in a much better place as a party. And the problem that Republicans have is that they’re fighting a battle they cannot win.” 

Note: El Paso is one of the safest big cities in the U.S. (not the safest city of any size) and it looks like San Pedro Sula, Honduras is more dangerous than Juarez.

April 27, 2014

Weatherford v. Gaetz in immigration feud reflects broader GOP divide

Geatz and WeatherfordSenate President Don Gaetz and House Speaker Will Weatherford stood before the conservative James Madison Institute last week and offered up their view of the world.

Gaetz, who at age 66 is nearly twice as old as Weatherford, seeded his talk with quips about the “communists” in the Democratic Party and the untrustworthy ways of the “liberal media.” Weatherford, 34, was a 10-year-old when the Berlin Wall fell and grew up long after the communist threat. He spoke of his hope for the Republican Party, and urged the crowd to be bolder and more compassionate.

“The state of Florida is changing, the demographics of this state and, as conservatives and people who believe in free enterprise, our message has to be a little bit stronger and maybe a little bit more inviting,’’ Weatherford said. His greatest regret, he added: “We don’t do a good job of fighting for people who are stuck in generational poverty.’’

Florida’s two Republican presiding officers not only represent the Legislature’s two chambers, they are a reflection of the generational and ideological differences that make up today’s Republican Party. As legislators enter the final week of the session, those differences will be manifest in the debate over the most divisive issue this session — whether to extend in-state tuition to the children of undocumented immigrants.

Weatherford, the second oldest of nine children who once credited society’s “safety net” for helping his struggling family, has spearheaded the bill as a “fundamental element of our American character that we don’t punish children for mistakes made by their parents.”

But for him, it is more than an issue of fairness, it is also practical politics.

“As a policymaker, it’s my job to help foster upward mobility through higher education by making a university degree more accessible for all of Florida’s children,’’ he wrote in an op-ed in the Tampa Bay Times before session began.

For Gaetz, a self-made millionaire who founded the nation’s first for-profit hospice chain, the proposal, SB 1400, is too broad, and too dangerous.

“It casts a blanket of approval over non-citizens who are in this country without proper legal status from anywhere in the world, including countries which are caldrons of terrorism and anti-American violence,” Gaetz wrote in an email this month to constituents.  Our story here.

Photo: Associated Press

April 24, 2014

Senate backs non-citizen's petition to practice law

A closely-divided Florida Senate Thursday championed the unprecedented case of Jose Godinez-Samperio of Largo, a law school graduate who has been denied a law license because he's not a citizen. Hours after senators rejected the idea on a 19-18 vote, they clearly approved it on a voice vote, but a final vote was delayed.

Senate Rules Chairman John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, changed his vote from no to yes and said in an interview he was distracted and voted the wrong way by mistake. "I think the kid deserves it. I think he's worked hard," Thrasher said. "I don't think we ought to punish kids who were brought here by their parents."

That's the same argument proponents are using to give discounted in-state college tuition to undocumented immigrant students living in Florida. But opponents said helping Godinez-Samperio was a serious mistake.

Likening Godinez-Samperio to a "lawbreaker," Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, asked: "Does being an American matter any more? ... We are making an illegal citizen an officer of the court."

"If they're here illegally, they need to get in line and do it the right way," said Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla.

All 14 Democrats and seven Republicans debated in favor of Godinez-Samperio or voted yes the first time, enough to pass the bill in the 40-member Senate.

The Senate will send the bill (HB 755) back to the House, where Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, has said he would like to find a way to help the would-be lawyer, a graduate of Florida State University law school.

Gov. Rick Scott issued a statement that said "this case demonstrates how broken our federal immigration laws are," but he did not say whether he would sign the bill if it reaches his desk.   

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in March that it cannot admit Godinez-Samperio unless directed by the Legislature, and it called on lawmakers to "remedy the inequities" in the case. Godinez-Samperio's effort to gain Bar admission and become a Tampa Bay immigration lawyer was before the state's high court for more than two years and drew the interest -- and opposition -- of the Obama White House. His volunteer attorney is one of Florida's most prominent lawyers, Talbot (Sandy) D'Alemberte, a former FSU president and American Bar Association president who served as a Democratic legislator in the 1960s, along with his wife and co-counsel, Patsy Palmer.

D'Alemberte has noted that Florida routinely licenses doctors and many other professionals who are not U.S. citizens. He has questioned why lawyers are treated differently, and said he expected to receive strong support in the House.

Godinez-Samperio, 27, is in the U.S. legally but temporarily as a "dreamer" under the 2012 presidential directive known as DACA or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which enabled him to get a Social Security number, work permit and Florida driver's license.

The Senate amendment was sponsored by Sens. Darren Soto, D-Orlando, and David Simmons, R-Altamonte Springs. It reads: "Upon certification by the Florida Board of Bar Examiners that an applicant who is an unauthorized immigrant who was brought to this state as a minor and who has been a resident of this state for more than 10 years and has fulfilled all requirements for admission to practice law in this state, the Supreme Court of Florida may admit that applicant as an attorney at law authorized to practice in this state and may direct an order be entered upon the court's records to that effect." The phrase "unauthorized immigrant" was lifted from the Supreme Court's opinion.

Miami: land of the ignorant

@MarcACaputo

Idea for immigration reform: A pop quiz to remove the citizenship status of those who can't pass a U.S. citizenship test.

The Immigrant Archive Project, dedicated to telling the story of immigrants, has helpfully identified a few candidates for us. And (surprise, surprise) they just happen to walk the streets of Miami-Dade County. All of us, including every immigrant struggling for citizenship, should be appalled.

How do you not know who the vice president is?

April 21, 2014

In early Hispanic outreach, Rick Scott unveils Spanish-language TV

@MarcACaputo

Gov. Rick Scott airs his campaign's first Spanish-language TV commercial, an earlier-than-usual Hispanic outreach effort that reflects Florida’s changing demographics as well as the depth of the Republican’s aggressive $6 million ad blitz .

No other Florida governor has advertised so heavily — especially in Spanish — nearly seven months before his election.

The ad’s title and message, “Oportunidad,” jibes with two English-language positive spots Scott began running in mid-March. It’s all about jobs, which have increased on his watch.

" Yo no soy un experto en la política pero yo sé el valor de un trabajo," Scott, looking into the camera, says in the new commercial ("I’m not an expert in politics, but I know how valuable a job is").

The rest of the 30-second ad, voiced-over by a woman, tells Scott's rags-to-riches story.

Of the nearly $5.4 million Scott has spent so far, the governor has run two negative ads that attack Democrat Charlie Crist for his support of Obamacare, described in a misleading way. The negative ads underscore Scott's relatively poor poll numbers compared to Crist.

Scott's supporters point out, however, that he's not just defensively going after Crist. The governor is going on offense by quickly reaching out to the fastest-growing segment of the state's electorate, Hispanics, who account for roughly 14 percent of the voter rolls.

Scott's campaign says the $500,000 Spanish-language television and online ad buy will start Wednesday in four major markets for Spanish media: Miami-Fort Lauderdale, Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fort Myers-Naples and the Orlando area.

Full story here