February 17, 2017

Fearing Trump, Miami-Dade commission drops county's "sanctuary" protections

Sanctuary four mhd cmg
@PatriciaMazzei @doug_hanks

Miami-Dade commissioners on Friday backed Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s controversial decision to detain jailed inmates sought for deportation by the federal government, citing funding threats by President Donald Trump and ignoring hours of emotional testimony from residents who implored the board to stand up to the mayor.

With a 9-3 vote, commissioners stood behind Gimenez despite listening to scores of residents who spent the day at County Hall hoping to persuade them to protect Miami-Dade’s immigrant identity.

“Shame on you!” the crowd cried after the vote, hurling bits of paper at the dais and standing up to yell and stomp out of the chambers. “May God have mercy on your soul,” one woman hollered.

Voting to endorse Gimenez’s Jan. 26 directive were Chairman Esteban “Steve” Bovo, Vice Chairwoman Audrey Edmonson and Commissioners Bruno Barreiro, Jose “Pepe” Diaz, Sally Heyman, Joe Martinez, Dennis Moss, Rebeca Sosa and Javier Souto. Voting against were Commissioners Daniella Levine Cava, Jean Monestime and Xavier Suarez. Commissioner Barbara Jordan was absent.

“Miami-Dade is not — has never considered itself — a sanctuary community” Gimenez said.

More here.

Photo credit: C.M. Guerrero, Miami Herald staff

Restore county's 'sanctuary' stance, residents urge Miami-Dade commission

Sanctuary five mhd cmg
@PatriciaMazzei @doug_hanks

One after another, the people who crammed the Miami-Dade County Commission chambers Friday delivered an extended, impassioned and often eloquent defense of immigration, imploring their elected leaders to defend South Florida’s diversity under the presidency of Donald Trump.

More than 150 people signed up to speak, almost all of them against Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to require local jails to detain inmates at the request of federal immigration authorities. Commissioners are scheduled to vote to accept or reject Gimenez’s directive later Friday.

The mayor has cast his action as a purely financial one, intended to avoid a federal funding cut threatened by a Trump executive order banning cities and counties that act as a “sanctuary” for immigrants who are in the country illegally.

But for most speakers — the vast majority of them Hispanic — Gimenez’s move to essentially revoke the county’s sanctuary stance represented an unacceptable rebuke to Miami-Dade’s immigrant identity.

“I’m heartbroken by this debate,” said Manuel Ernesto Gutierrez, who described himself as a U.S. Navy veteran. “What bothers me — and should bother you — is the fundamental issue of what kind of community do we want to be. Do we want to be a welcoming community?”

More here.

Photo credit: C.M. Guerrero, Miami Herald staff

February 13, 2017

ICE says it didn't carry out immigration raid in Plant City last week

via @learyreports

WASHINGTON -- A federal official on Monday denied reports that immigration raids were carried out in Plant City in the last week, though there was recent activity related to a search warrant.

A spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement said there was no activity, despite immigrant advocates saying otherwise -- comments that were reflected in numerous news reports beginning Friday.

"The incident the media reports are likely referring to was earlier this month and was part of a criminal search warrant," ICE spokeswoman Tamara Spicer told the Tampa Bay Times in an email. "As it is part of a criminal investigation pending federal prosecution, we cannot release further details."

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Monday that ICE conducted sweeps in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, San Antonio and New York City and arrested arrested more than 680 individuals who "pose a threat to public safety, border security or the integrity of our nation’s immigration system."

Plant City, in Hillsborough County, has a sizable immigrant population due to farming.

It's possible the search warrant Spicer mentioned was conflated with the raids in Los Angeles, etc., but reports of blanket raids in Florida appear to be false.

--ALEX LEARY, Tampa Bay Times

February 09, 2017

Study: South Florida ranks No. 5 in undocumented immigrant population

110Gimenez01 NEW PPP
@PatriciaMazzei

South Florida is home to nearly half a million immigrants who are in the country illegally, making it the metropolitan area with the fifth-largest undocumented population in the U.S., according to a new analysis by the Pew Research Center.

Some 450,000 unauthorized immigrants reside in the greater Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach area, Pew found, based on 2014 estimates from government data. About 55,000 live in the city of Miami alone.

President Donald Trump has promised to crack down on illegal immigration, signing an executive order last month to cut federal funding for cities and counties considered “sanctuaries” for the undocumented. To avoid the label, Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez quickly agreed to hold inmates in local jails for federal immigration agents even if the feds refuse to reimburse the county for the expense — a contentious policy reversal that has been met with protests.

South Florida trails other major urban centers that attract scores more of undocumented immigrants. Leading the list are New York and Los Angeles, with 1.2 million and 1 million, respectively. In third and fourth place are Houston (575,000) and Dallas (450,000).

More here.

VIDEO: 'We are a nation of rules,' lawmakers say in unveiling plan to ban 'sanctuary' cities

@ByKristenMClark @JeremySWallace

State Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha, say their 2017 legislation seeking to outlaw "sanctuary" cities is about maintaining the rule of law and keeping communities safe from those who are in the United States illegally and may wish to do harm.

They explain more below. Find our full story here, which includes details on their legislation.

Florida lawmakers unveil latest plan to outlaw 'sanctuary' cities

Bean metz press 0208

@ByKristenMClark

Declaring “we are a nation of rules,” Florida Republican lawmakers have officially revived their efforts to go after so-called “sanctuary” cities and counties in Florida — and their elected officials — that don’t fully cooperate with federal enforcement of immigration law.

The bills (SB 786 / HB 697) — dubbed the “Rule of Law Adherence Act” — impose an array of restrictions to ban “sanctuary policies” in Florida and create fines and penalties for state agencies, local governments or law enforcement agencies that have one. Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha, unveiled their legislation Wednesday in Tallahassee.

“The one thing that everybody should know in our country is: We can’t choose which laws we’ll obey or which laws we don’t obey,” said Bean, who told the Herald/Times last week the legislation would be coming.

The bills would formally define a “sanctuary policy” as any “law, policy, practice, procedure, or custom adopted or permitted” by a state, local or law enforcement agency “which contravenes or which knowingly prohibits or impedes a law enforcement agency from communicating or cooperating with a federal immigration agency with respect to federal immigration enforcement.”

It’s not clear when — or even, if — the legislation might be considered, but the proposal is likely to draw backlash from Democrats, as well as immigrant advocates and local governments.

More here on what exactly Bean and Metz are proposing this year.

Photo credit: Jeremy Wallace / Herald/Times Tallahassee bureau

February 08, 2017

Trump wants cops to turn over 'bad' undocumented immigrants

Trump (6) (1)
@PatriciaMazzei

President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants local cops to do exactly what Miami-Dade County police say they would like to avoid: work much more closely with federal immigration authorities.

Speaking to a conference of police chiefs in Washington, Trump urged cops to turn over “bad” immigrants who are in the country illegally to the Department of Homeland Security. That’s home to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which oversees deportations.

Trump told police they could tell Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly — the former head of the U.S. Southern Command in Doral — “who the illegal immigrant gang members are.”

“You know the illegals. You know them by their first name. You know them by their nicknames,” Trump said. “You’re in the neighborhoods: You know the bad ones, you know the good ones. I want you to turn in the bad ones.”

Miami-Dade police have no qualms about alerting immigration to violent criminals they have arrested. But the definition of “bad” is hazy, and local cops still have lingering questions over how far the administration may push them to cooperate.

“It’s clear that they haven’t established any policies yet,” said Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Pérez, who attended the Major Cities Chiefs Association and Major County Sheriff’s Association conference where Trump spoke. “It’s still too soon.”

More here.

Photo credit: Evan Vucci, Associated Press

February 03, 2017

Lawmakers propose harsher penalties on undocumented immigrants. It isn't likely to pass.

IMG_inmi_2_1_J83KINAJ

@ByKristenMClark

More than 1,800 undocumented immigrants currently serving time in Florida prisons for felony offenses such as murder or armed burglary could have faced years or even decades more behind bars — at Florida taxpayers’ expense — had a proposal being vetted now by state lawmakers already been law.

Citing a desire to “keep our citizens and constituents safe,” Elkton Republican Sen. Travis Hutson — for the second year in a row — wants to impose stiffer penalties on undocumented immigrants than U.S. citizens or legal residents would otherwise face for the same violent crimes.

Last year, Hutson’s proposal was never considered. But 2017 offers a different dynamic that’s allowing his idea to get at least some consideration and put immigrant advocates on edge.

More conservative Republicans now hold influential positions in the Florida Senate, and the upcoming legislative session comes after a presidential campaign in which illegal immigration was a driving issue and as a Trump White House makes it a priority to crack down on undocumented immigrants — particularly those who commit crimes.

RELATED: On heels of Trump order, Florida lawmakers also want to penalize ‘sanctuaries’

Hutson and other Republican senators — including Senate President Joe Negron, of Stuart — argue enhanced criminal penalties are warranted because undocumented immigrants already flout the law by being in the country illegally.

“You’ve broken the rules to get here, and then you have the temerity to violate our laws and commit violent crimes against our citizens, so I do think that some enhanced penalties are appropriate in that circumstance,” Negron said.

But even with that endorsement, Hutson’s proposal (SB 120) isn’t expected to earn enough support to clear both chambers of the Republican-led Legislature.

The House hasn’t made it an early priority as the Senate has, and Hutson’s plan has drawn swift rebuke from immigrant advocates and some religious groups, who argue the idea is unjust and discriminatory.

More here.

Photo credit: John Moore / Getty Images

Former U.S. Attorneys bash Trump's immigration ban

Gelber_horizontalAP

via @jayhweaver

Three dozen former federal prosecutors — many Democrats, but some Republicans — issued a statement Thursday denouncing President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily banning people from the predominantly Muslim countries of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen from entering the United States.

“If we were called upon to defend the executive order, could we do it within the guidelines we learned and lived by as lawyers for the United States?” said the statement signed by 36 former federal prosecutors who worked in South Florida, including three U.S. attorneys in Miami. “We could not. ...

“It would be our job, if we were representing the United States today, to say, no, this executive order is wrong and should not be defended,” the statement reads.

The group condemned Trump’s order as “a thinly veiled attempt to exclude Muslims from certain countries based on their religion,” and lauded Acting Attorney General Sally Yates for refusing to enforce the order because she did not believe it was lawful. Yates was summarily fired by the president.

Dan Gelber, a Democrat running for Miami Beach mayor, was one of the prosecutors who signed the letter.

Keep reading here.

 

February 02, 2017

A 'sanctuary cities' bill is in the works for 2017 session

SanctuaryFolo+one+mhd

@ByKristenMClark

As President Donald Trump’s administration cracks down on so-called “sanctuary” cities for undocumented immigrants, some Republican lawmakers in Florida aim to do the same this year.

State Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, told the Herald/Times that he and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha, are drafting legislation that will seek to impose “consequences” on cities and counties “who say there are only select, certain federal laws they’re going to abide by.”

“We’re looking at financial penalties, yes,” Bean said when asked if the consequences potentially included withholding state funding from cities and counties deemed “sanctuaries” for immigrants who are in the country illegally.

“We’re also looking at removing the umbrella of your sovereign immunity for elected individuals, boards and constitutional officers,” Bean said — which would allow victims of crimes committed by undocumented immigrants to then sue city and county officials if they don’t fully comply with enforcing federal immigration laws.

More here.

Photo credit: Protesters gather at the Miami-Dade government center on Jan. 27, 2017, to protest against Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to remove the county’s label as a “sanctuary” for undocumented immigrants in the country illegally. C.M. Guerrero / el Neuvo Herald