July 19, 2016

Florida GOP adds breakfast headliners, including Rick Scott

@PatriciaMazzei

CLEVELAND -- The Florida delegation will start the last day of the Republican National Convention with a high-powered breakfast.

Newly announced speakers are former House Speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich, Gov. Rick Scott, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions and former Amb. John Bolton

The downside? The breakfast has now been moved up to 7:15 a.m. -- an early hour for delegates (and reporters) who will inevitably be bleary-eyed from the night before.

Wednesday's speakers are political commentator Dick Morris and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, still a beloved figure among many Florida Republican politicians.

Scott is expected to address the full convention Wednesday night.

July 05, 2016

Florida Republicans hammer Hillary Clinton over emails

@PatriciaMazzei

FBI Director James Comey on Tuesday called Hillary Clinton "extremely careless" in her use of private email while Secretary of State, but recommended no charges against her. That prompted backlash from Florida Republicans. Comey, it's worth mentioning, is a Republican.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio:

The FBI concluded what many Americans have known for quite some time, which is that Hillary Clinton’s conduct as Secretary of State and her mishandling of classified information was disgraceful and unbecoming of someone who aspires to the presidency. There is simply no excuse for Hillary Clinton's decision to set up a home-cooked email system which left sensitive and classified national security information vulnerable to theft and exploitation by America’s enemies. Her actions were grossly negligent, damaged national security and put lives at risk.

Hillary Clinton's actions have sent the worst message to the millions of hard-working federal employees who hold security clearances and are expected to go to great lengths to secure sensitive government information and abide by the rules. They don't take their oaths lightly, and we shouldn't expect any less of their leaders.

Hillary Clinton’s reckless and thoughtless mishandling of classified information is not the end of the story however. It’s only a matter of time before the next shoe drops and the nexus of corruption and controversy that has surrounded Hillary Clinton throughout her time in public office produces yet another scandal for the American people to endure. Given the consequential and challenging times in which we live, America simply cannot afford any more Clinton drama.

Continue reading "Florida Republicans hammer Hillary Clinton over emails" »

June 14, 2016

Republicans troll Miami-Dade legislative candidate for not living in district

@ByKristenMClark

A Democratic newcomer who's challenging an incumbent Republican lawmaker in Hialeah is under attack for not currently living in the district that she's seeking to represent.

In a 30-second online ad, the Republican Party of Florida says "Ivette Gonzalez Petkovich doesn't live in Hialeah, but she thinks she can represent Hialeah."

The ad capitalizes on comments Gonzalez Petkovich made to Politico Florida last month, when the website reported that she and her husband, Alex, live in an area of Doral that's just outside House District 103 -- where she's challenging state Rep. Manny Diaz Jr., R-Hialeah.

But Gonzalez Petkovich, an attorney with her own Coral Gables-based law firm, said Tuesday it's "laughable" for Republicans to paint her as someone unfamiliar with the district since she was born and raised there.

District 103 includes Miramar, Hialeah, Hialeah Gardens, Medley and part of Doral.

Continue reading "Republicans troll Miami-Dade legislative candidate for not living in district" »

May 27, 2016

In this age of political disruption, is the party as we know it over?

Political parties KRT Tim GoheenThis summer may be remembered not only for a blue moon and the welcome end to a bitter presidential primary, it may also mark the time America’s century-old political parties went on life support.

At the top of the ticket, both the Florida Democratic Party and the Republican Party of Florida have anointed presidential frontrunners who are seen by most voters more negatively than positively. Corporate donors, the bread and butter of the party diet, are circumventing the parties in large numbers by contributing directly to candidates’ committees.

 

In Florida, the often-reliable bellwether for the nation, party membership is steadily eroding as the majority of new voters don’t register with any party and fewer new voters are registering than have in previous presidential years.

Then there are the casualties.

Florida Congresswomen Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the head of the Democratic National Committee, has beentargeted for defeat from within by Bernie Sanders, the 74-year-old Vermont senator who is the overwhelming favorite of the youth vote. Jeb Bush, Florida GOP’s favorite son, is so disgusted by Donald Trump and his message he has announced he won’t vote for his party’s nominee. And GOP candidates in Hispanic-rich South Florida are keeping their distance from the frontrunner.

With a battleground this bloodied, can political parties be saved?

It’s an uncomfortable question that could have serious implications for future statewide candidates like Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Congresswoman Gwen Graham. Each hopes to run for governor in 2018 relying on a durable, traditional, governing coalition.

But 2016 laid waste to durable traditions as Florida and the nation showed that its allegiance to political parties was over.

“I think we’ve got 20 more years of disruption ahead of us,” predicts Steve Schale, the Democratic consultant to who steered Obama’s victory in Florida in 2008. “You’ve got a generation of people who are growing up in a time when traditional organizations are not vital to the world. We have to figure out what do we look like in the next 20 years, and do we even exist?” 

The numbers tell just part of the story. Of the 2.1 million new registered voters in Florida since 2012, 28 percent have registered Republican, 31 percent Democrat and 42 percent registered anything else, according to data analyzed by Associated Industries of Florida.

David Johnson, former executive director of the Republican Party who worked on Bush’s Right to Rise political committee this election cycle, is among those who say his party has reached an existential crisis.

“The Republican Party is torn apart,” he said, and how it handles Trump’s divisive campaign will be the crucial test. “There is no question in my mind there is a path toward a viable third or fourth party in the future.” More here

Illustration: Tim Goheen, KRT

 

May 26, 2016

Florida GOP to Donald Trump: Congrats on reaching 1,237

@PatriciaMazzei

From Republican Party of Florida Chairman Blaise Ingoglia:

The Republican Party of Florida would like to congratulate Donald Trump on surpassing the required number of delegates to clinch the Republican nomination for president. Throughout this primary Mr. Trump has generated a historic voter turnout and built an unstoppable momentum that dwarfs the efforts of the Democrats – a testament to voters’ eagerness for a new leader that will not promote the same failed policies of the last eight years.

May 15, 2016

Florida Republicans pick remaining convention delegates

via @adamsmithtimes

In the end, everybody wound up reasonably happy over the Republican National Convention delegates selected Saturday by the state GOP's executive board. Behind the scenes, however, there was a fair amount of tension and brewing animosity in recent days when it seemed Florida GOP Chairman Blaise Ingoglia was poised to recommend a slate of delegates that largely ignored the wishes of the Donald Trump campaign.

"We were a little bit nervous going into the meeting today, but Blaise stepped up in a big way," Joe Gruters, co-chairman of the Trump campaign in Florida, said, after the state party's executive board elected 15 delegates and 15 alternates to the national convention. They were:

Continue reading "Florida Republicans pick remaining convention delegates" »

May 10, 2016

Payday lenders have given millions to Florida politicians

Payday lenders have donated about $2.5 million to Florida politicians and and both political parties in recent years, according to a new analysis by a liberal group.

Allied Progress has drawn attention to the issue of payday lending in Florida by attacking U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the Democratic national committee chair, and other politicians who have taken money from the industry.

The group gave the Miami Herald an advanced copy of its new report, “A Florida Plan: How Payday lenders bought Florida’s political establishment.” The report lists donations given to federal and state candidates as well as the state’s Republican and Democratic parties since 2009.

Overall, Republicans received $1.6 million and Democrats received about $890,000, while $29,000 went to independents. But the top individual recipients were South Florida Democrats.

Keep reading from the Miami Herald.



May 03, 2016

Florida GOP to pick final presidential convention delegates

@PatriciaMazzei

The Republican Party of Florida will select the remaining 15 of its 99 presidential nominating delegates next week in Tampa.

Party honchos will meet May 13-14 at the DoubleTree Hotel in Tampa for their quarterly meeting. At 12:30 p.m. May 14, a Saturday, the RPOF executive board will name its delegates, who will join the ones picked in recent weeks for each congressional district by Republican Executive Committees in each Florida county. That process drew ire from supporters of front-runner Donald Trump, who said they were left out of many of the slots, particularly in South Florida.

The sort of delegates picked at the RPOF level are people like state Rep. José Oliva of Miami Lakes, a likely future speaker of the Florida House of Representatives.

Here's the meeting's public schedule:

Continue reading "Florida GOP to pick final presidential convention delegates " »

May 02, 2016

Starbucks heckler vs Rick Scott led PolitiFact Florida in April 2016

Starbucksspat

When Gov. Rick Scott walked into a Starbucks in Gainesville, he got an unexpected jolt when a customer attacked his record on spending for health care and Planned Parenthood.

Scott fired back by defending his jobs record.

The exchange, in which heckler Cara Jennings called Scott an "a------" drew more than 2.3 million hits on YouTube, made national news and led our fact-checks in April.

Other statements that drew in readers were by Republican frontrunner Donald Trump and his campaign manager Corey Lewandowski; U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Orlando, who is running for U.S. Senate; and Democratic presidential candidate.

Here’s a look at PolitiFact Florida’s most clicked fact-checks in April counting down to the most popular.

 

April 20, 2016

Donald Trump's manager Corey Lewandowski botches claim on Florida delegates

CoreyTrumpReuters

Donald Trump’s campaign has been crying foul over the delegate selection in Florida, accusing Republican party insiders of stacking the deck against Trump.

In Miami-Dade County, home of former presidential candidates Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush, few of the 15 delegates chosen April 16 appeared to be overt Trump fans.

The next day, Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski accused Blaise Ingoglia, chairman of the Republican Party of Florida, of bias against Trump.

"The chairman of the party of Florida, who is an avid and outward supporter of Marco Rubio, gets to appoint 30 of those delegates," Lewandowski said April 17. "Now, I understand those are the rules, but Donald Trump won. And now, you’ve got a person who is supporting Marco Rubio who gets to appoint 30 of the 99 delegates. That’s not what the rules should be."

We will explain how Lewandowski got his facts wrong about the delegate selection and Ingoglia. We did not get a response from the Trump campaign for this fact-check.

Keep reading from PolitiFact Florida.