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Collaborative Intelligence: how collaborating across industries turns ideas into a business

By Todd Oretsky

Todd Oretsky headshot - lower resWhat happens when an advertising entrepreneur, mobile interface designer and communications expert come together serendipitously to create the next great mobile app?

At Pipeline,  we call it collaborative intelligence - and it's a phenomenon that happens multiple times each day in our shared workspace community.

Together, these three entrepreneurs are developing an application that will allow mobile users to see an instant personal profile of the caller with data and details pulled from all the social channels in which they are active, from LinkedIn, to Facebook to Foursquare, among others. It instantly provides information about the person that would otherwise have taken precious time to compile.

Entrepreneurs Adam Boalt, David Elgina and Jose Paz were able to develop the mobile application they are currently tweaking and testing because of the synergistic expertise and knowledge working together provided.


Pipeline Lounge & Cafe - resizedThe ability of these entrepreneurs to develop an initial idea by pulling together their expertise, knowledge and experience via collaboration proves why it leads to a higher likelihood of success. The increasing demand for collaborative workspace we are seeing in Miami -- such as at Pipeline, pictured here -- stems from the growing number of entrepreneurs and start-up businesses that are investing and working in our community.

There are a number of benefits to collaborative intelligence, beginning with the ability to share what you know, what you think you know and what you need to discover. By gathering around a table and discussing, debating and developing an idea, entrepreneurs are able to create something that they may never have been able to create on their own.

Challenges still exist when collaborating with people from different disciplines.  Most parties see a problem from their own lens, fail to understand the other issues that may exist and have different levels of commitment. Start-ups and small businesses are often self-financed and require venture capital and family-friends financing to turn an idea into a business. But the end result for these entrepreneurs is not only moving the needle in innovation, but making a profit and achieving success.

In Miami, small businesses and entrepreneurial companies serve as the backbone of the regional economy.  The growth of collaborative intelligence will prove to be the catalyst that creates successful Miami homegrown companies to fuel the future of the local economy.

This, however, is going to take a collective effort on the part of the private and public sectors to support and invest in developing an ecosystem that nourishes small businesses and start-ups, so that they invest in staying and growing here in Miami. For now, we are enjoying the new ideas that are created on a daily basis as a result of the emerging concept of collaborative intelligence within our community.

Todd Oretsky is CEO and Co-Founder of Pipeline, a collaborative workspace at 1101 Brickell Avenue. For more information, visit www.pipelinebrickell.com.

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