August 03, 2017

Want to pitch at the Florida Venture Capital Conference? Here’s how to apply

The Florida Venture Forum is calling for growth stage companies to apply to present at the 2018 Florida Venture Capital Conference, being held at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale on January 30-31, 2018.

The conference, now in its 27th year, is one of the largest gatherings of venture capitalists and investors in the Southeast, and features panel discussions, speakers, and presentations by some of Florida’s fastest growing private companies.

In addition to the opportunity to present before an audience of active equity investors, presenting companies meeting designated criteria will compete for the Accelerating Innovation (AI) Award, offered by Space Florida. The AI Award offers a cash prize totaling $100,000 to eligible Florida companies, and companies seeking to relocate or establish presence in Florida.

Presenter applications will be reviewed and companies chosen by a selection committee made up of active venture capitalists and investors. Presenter and AI Award eligibility criteria, and full conference details, may be found on the Forum’s website (www.flventure.org).

THE FINAL APPLICATION DEADLINE IS DECEMBER 20, 2017. Early submissions are welcomed and encouraged.

- submitted by Florida Venture Forum

Apply now for second cohort of Startupbootcamp Digital Health

Applications for Startupbootcamp's Digital Health innovation program in Miami are now open. Submit your application and you could be one of the companies selected to gain access to a national network of healthcare providers, insurers and investors. The application deadline is Oct. 6
 

Selected companies will receive:

  • Implementation opportunities with leading hospital systems including the Miami Children's Hospital, University of Miami, Jackson Health, Mayo Clinic (Jacksonville), Carolinas, local and national insurers, pharma and many others
  • Extensive mentorship from industry leading experts, entrepreneurs and investors 
  • $20K with up to a $100K convertible note and access to follow-on capital 
  • Office space in the heart of Miami
  • $500K in partner services from Google, Amazon, Salesforce, Intel and Paypal

- Submitted by Startupbootcamp Digital Health

August 02, 2017

How to apply for next cohort of 10,000 Small Businesses program

Miami Dade College is accepting applications for Cohort 13 of the 10,000 Small Businesses program scheduled to begin Jan. 24, 2018 at the Wolfson Campus.

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program is a classroom-based practical business education program that gives entrepreneurs several benefits including valuable skills for growing their businesses, the opportunity to access financial capital and powerful networking opportunities at no cost to participants.

The curriculum includes one-on-one advice, clinics, and workshops administered by subject matter experts. Goldman Sachs professionals also serve as panelists and judges for “Rocket Pitches”, which allow business owners to practice their business pitch to a potential lender or investor. Participants will also learn to identify and evaluate opportunities, understand financial statements, hire, retain and lead employees, negotiate successfully and create a comprehensive growth plan, among other lessons.

The program was launched at MDC’s Freedom Tower on October 1, 2013, when Goldman Sachs and Miami Dade College entered a five-year, $5 million partnership to deliver the 10KSB program in Miami.

 Applicants should meet the following criteria:

* Owner or co-owner of a business

* Business in operation for at least two years

* Business revenues of at least $150,000 in the most recent fiscal year

* Minimum of four employees, including the owner

The first three and a half years of program graduated 282 small business owners who are now poised for growth.

To learn more, RSVP below for an upcoming Webinar:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5957251140613762307

To participate in Cohort 13 of MDC’s 10KSB program, visit http://www.10KSBapply.com to apply or call 305-237-7824. The deadline to apply for Cohort 13 is October 10, 2017. 

- Submitted by Miami Dade College

July 29, 2017

App to help divorced parents manage everyday life featured on 'Planet of the Apps'

Gwyneth Paltrow Michael Daniels Fayr Presentation 1

Michael Daniels, with Gwyneth Paltrow, making his presentation for "Planet of the Apps." 

Fayr app was created by a divorced dad in Weston

By Nancy Dahlberg / ndahlberg@miamiherald.com

Weston resident Michael Daniels and his new iTunes app, Fayr, were featured on  Apple Music’s “Planet of the Apps” this week. Daniels, a divorced dad with two young children, created Fayr to help divorced parents streamline family management, such as scheduling and budgeting.

The app won the support of “Planet of the Apps” judges and Daniels secured a partnership with Academy Award-winning actress and “conscious uncoupling” advocate Gwyneth Paltrow, who's now an advisor for Fayr. This week, Fayr was the featured app on the iTunes store.

Daniels, 37, a custom home builder, says he was inspired to create Fayr when the challenges of co-parenting began to overwhelm him. The app creates a joint family calendar to track activities and time-sharing, and generates digital records of expenses and real-time location check-ins. It also offers in-app texting to simplify communication between parents.

“My favorite thing about Fayr is that it was created with the whole family in mind. Separating is a challenging transition for any couple. When children are involved, it’s especially tender and worrisome,” Paltrow said, in a news release. “Fayr removes unnecessary stresses and tension so parents can collaborate to create calm and stability for their children.”

Fayr launched in beta mode several months ago and attracted the attention of  “Planet of The Apps,”  Apple’s new reality series for aspiring app developers. Working with entrepreneur advisors Jessica Alba, Gwyneth Paltrow, Gary Vaynerchuk and Will.i.am, developers and their concepts endure an intense incubation period and then a high-stakes pitch. New episodes debut Tuesdays on Apple Music.

Fayr is available on iOS with a monthly subscription of $4.99. An Android version is planned by year's end. More information:  www.fayr.com.

Follow @ndahlberg on Twitter

 

Argentina to Miami, a bridge worth building (Part 7)

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A Q&A with Alejandro Mainetto, Partner of Globant, a multinational company that creates innovative software products for brands, about Globant's footprint in Miami, collaboration and making Miami a living tech lab.

By Natalia Martinez-Kalinina

Miami has a ways to go before we can truly claim the title of regional epicenter, but Argentina has long been recognized as one of the primary entrepreneurial - albeit not particularly stable - ecosystems in Latin America. Figuring out how to support Argentina’s wave of growth and appetite for engagement represents a unique opportunity to add value to the region and truly deliver on our vision as a gateway.

As a first step to test these waters, a group of us came together last year  to co-author a full day of programming within StartupWeekBuenosAires - the largest event of its kind in Latin America-  specifically focused on how to engage with the U.S. ecosystem and market by way of Miami. From the CIC Miami perspective, we have been working to build tangible bridges with Argentina though a handful of partnerships that will be announced in the next few months, in addition to our general softlanding offering. But most recently, a few interested entrepreneurs have come together with the support of the Argentine Consulate in Miami to create a better toolkit for entrepreneurs and small companies looking to come to Miami from their native country. We are still finalizing the framework, but anyone interested in participating or learning more can email EmprendedoresArgMia@gmail.com

Glonbant_0888Given the aligned priorities and interests, it seemed worthwhile to continue featuring  interviews with a varied range of Argentine entrepreneurs and companies making their way to Miami. The first installments of this series have featured interviews with Balloon Group, Wolox, La Comunidad, and Oasis, Juana de Arco, and Socialmetrix. For this installment, we spoke with Alejandro Mainetto (pictured here) to shine a light on a major regional player, Globant, where he is a Partner.

Globant is a powerhouse of a company in Argentina and the region. What was the genesis story for the company? What has been the trajectory of growth these last years?

Globant's history began in 2003, when four friends got together with the idea of creating an multinational company that could provide innovative IT services to brands across the world, while offering challenging career opportunities for IT professionals and talent. In just 12 years they built a company that today has more than 6,000 professionals working for companies like Google, LinkedIn, JWT, EA and Coca Cola, among others. Globant’s story has also been selected as a case study at MIT and Stanford.

What’s next - how do you see the company’s future growth and development?

Globant continues being focused in becoming a global digital thought leader, in creating software that appeals and connects emotionally with millions of consumers. We seek to deliver the optimal blend of engineering, design, and innovation to harness the potential of emerging technologies for our clients. While engineering is central to information technology, only by combining strong engineering capabilities with creativity and agility can we deliver innovative solutions that enhance end-user experiences while meeting our clients’ business needs.

We take a dive into our customers industry, culture, challenges and goals in order to understand their business. The harmonious integration future trends and existing IT, infrastructure, services and applications is a critical enabler of any Digital Transformation process.

The US is currently a big focus of expansion - Globant has recently made four acquisitions in the US in a very short period of time and we continue to increase the number of people we hire in key markets for us such as Seattle, Dallas, Raleigh, Orlando and also Miami. Finally, Globant will also expand and grow by continuing to invest in key emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, Virtual Reality and Blockchain among others. In order to fuel this growth we strive to find the best talent possible - hopefully we'll find that talent coming from places such as South Florida and in particular Miami.

What is Globant’s footprint/engagement with Miami? Why did it choose to come here?

Globant has had a presence in Miami for the last 8 years working with several of the most important corporations in the city and the state of Florida. We are a global leader in advising clients in the travel and hospitality, financial services and healthcare industries - all big industries in Miami - We are currently working with many of the largest leaders in cruise lines, hospitality, entertainment, and software. However, the potential is still very large in terms of the number of companies that we could be helping in the South Florida area. We need to do a better job in getting the Globant brand and our capabilities recognized in the Miami market. We came to Miami because we believed in the city, the clients we could serve, its growing talent and specially its potential and what Miami could become one day.


What kinds of opportunities were you looking for here? What aspects or risks worried you? How have those played out over your time in Miami?

We were looking for opportunities to help companies become true transformational leaders in their own industries, we were looking to gain a presence in a city that could quickly become a tech hub within the US and the tech hub for Latin America, and finally we were also looking to establish a presence in a State which traditionally has been very pro business and easy to do business with.

How do you see Miami today? What works, what surprises you, what frustrates you? How have you found your industry reflected here?

It's a different Miami than the one from 5 years ago. A lot has happened and a lot more will continue to happen. - Places like co-working spaces came, innovation districts like CIC came, conference events like Emerge Americas came, accelerators and incubators came, powerful startups such as Magic Leap came, the money came but most importantly the talent came and the talent stayed.

Miami works because it's like putting together NYC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro all in one. Its weather, its lifestyle, its location - all major pluses, it's a good kept secret, but not for long. What surprises me, is that it still hasn't been able to attract bigger Fortune 500 companies and it hasn't built a new top technology and engineering education institution. The tech, creative and marketing industry which today has converged into a Digital Industry is not yet well represented, which is a huge opportunity for those who are smart enough to settle and lay roots in Miami - The city, the county and the state need to collectively join forces to attract more digital companies, more tech universities and more digital jobs.

What can Miami do better to become a truly value-adding “hub” for the region? (in your industry and in general)

I have written extensively about this and it goes back to five key points:

1) Need for a true coalition of government, corporate, vc, startups, academia and the community led by a set of progressive leaders

2) Need for development of innovation districts and the need for creating concentrated hubs/tech parks of technology and digital companies

3) Build a world class public transportation system and build somewhat affordable housing around these innovation districts

4) Make Miami a Living Tech Lab - Become the Smart City Poster Child, become the Autonomous Self-Driving Capital of the World, etc.

5) Become obsessed about marketing the Miami Tech brand, its value proposition and reward those who take a bet in Miami.

How has it worked to have your company straddling Miami and Buenos Aires (and the US and Latin America overall)? Any lessons or advice for companies exploring similar moves?

It's has worked very well - There is a natural magnetic connection between Latam and Miami - Miami is both aspirational and inspirational. While our company is a global company, we find it hard for anyone to say no when we ask them to come work and spend some time in Miami. However, the key is in committing, betting and investing on it.

The advice I would give companies or entrepreneurs is to commit to Miami, leverage its virtues when hiring talent and finally get deeply involved in the transformation of the city.

Organizations like Endeavor have talked at length about the “Argentine Model,” but Argentina is also a country that has lived through rocky political and economic cycles. Is there something Miami can learn from the Argentine case study?

Miami can learn from Buenos Aires and many other cities in Latin America - From Buenos Aires you can learn about tenacity and hard work, about staying the course even when things may not be going right or you may be living under a not so ideal environment. It can also learn about the perseverance, vision and risk taking ability of the unicorns that Buenos Aires has produced - Globant being one of those. Miami can learn that "Si se Puede" - It's Possible.     

Do you see potential for collaboration and bridge-building between the entrepreneurial ecosystem and the creative economies in Buenos Aires and Miami? Why or why not?

Absolutely - I think, there are ways to formalize the informal collaboration and bridge-building that has been established already but much more can be done. Miami can make Buenos Aires a sister city and offer an immediate presence here to all key Argentinian technology firms. Miami could become the epitome of how easy it can be to do business in the US.  Miami companies should have the ability to penetrate Latin America by easily establishing their Latam HQ's in Buenos Aires. Co-working spaces and innovation districts have an opportunity to collaborate and forge exchange partnerships. The sky is the limit.


Natalia Martinez-Kalinina is the General Manager of CIC Miami and the Founder of Awesome Foundation MIAMI, and co-Founder of Aminta Ventures. If you are an Argentine company looking to expand to Miami or a Miami-based entrepreneur/investor looking to connect with the argentine ecosystem, please reach out to Natalia at martinez@cic.us. Past installments of this series can be found here: Balloon Group, Wolox, La Comunidad, and Oasis, Juana de Arco, and Socialmetrix.

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July 27, 2017

Modernizing Medicine to add 838 jobs, double office space

Health-tech company Modernizing Medicine announced on Thursday that it will be expanding, creating more than 800 new jobs and doubling its office space in Boca Raton.

Modernizing Medicine currently employs about 550 people and is generating $100 million in revenues annually, making it one of South Florida’s largest and fastest-growing tech companies. “There are not many companies growing as fast as Modernizing Medicine — in the world,” said Gov. Rick Scott, who was on hand for the announcement in Boca Raton.

Modernizing Medicine will receive $6 million in state, county and city incentives for creating the jobs by 2022, according to the Sun Sentinel. The 838 new, mostly software positions will have an average salary of $65,000 a year. In exchange, Modernizing Medicine will make a $15 million investment in the region.

To handle its growth, Modernizing Medicine is leasing 50,000 square feet at Boca Raton Innovation Campus, former home of IBM, to add to its similarly sized headquarters space at the FAU Research Park and an office in Weston. In May, Modernizing Medicine announced it had received a $231 million investment from private equity firm Warburg Pincus. “If there was any doubt that you could found and scale a company in South Florida, hopefully those doubts are now erased,” CEO Dan Cane said at the time.

Founded in 2010 by Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Modernizing Medicine has been one of the recent tech success stories in South Florida. Cane, a serial entrepreneur who earlier in his career co-founded and exited education-tech company Blackboard, met Sherling, his future co-founder, in the doctor’s office. Modernizing Medicine’s flagship product is EMA, which is a mobile, cloud-based, specialty-specific electronic health record system now used by more than 10,000 providers at thousands of specialty practices nationwide, and the company now offers a full suite of products and services including practice management, revenue cycle management, telehealth for dermatology and analytics.

July 26, 2017

South Florida markets in top 5 for tech growth, CBRE report says

The Fort Lauderdale area ranked No. 2 and the Miami ranked No. 4 on CBRE’s list of tech talent momentum markets, a measurement of the change in tech job growth.

As part of its Scoring Tech Talent Report, which ranks 50 U.S. and Canadian markets according to their ability to attract and grow tech talent, the report also found that Madison, WI, had the most tech hiring momentum. Salt Lake City and Kansas City, MO, rounded out the top five.

The report found that tech job growth job creation grew faster in the past two years (2015-2016) compared with the prior two-year period (2013-2014) in 28 of the 50 markets. The Miami area’s tech talent pool grew 22.8 percent from 2015 to 2016, up from 3.7 percent in 2013-2014, while Fort Lauderdale’s talent pool grew 21.3 percent, after falling 2.1 percent in 2013-2014, the report found. Contributing to that growth are companies such as Magic Leap, which employs about 800 people in Broward County, the majority of them hired in the last 18 months.

 “South Florida has been working hard to establish itself as a hub for the technology industry, and it is exciting to see how quickly the industry is growing. South Florida is also a hot market for startups, and as demand for office space continues to increase, we are seeing more tech companies establish operations in South Florida,” said Shay Pope, CBRE’s senior vice president of advisory and transaction services.

To view the full report, visit Scoring Tech Talent in North America 2017. 

[Read more: What’s the average tech salary? How many startups are sprouting? A by the numbers look

In growth spurt, AGP Miami funds Animusoft, other South Florida startups

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By Nancy Dahlberg / ndahlberg@miamiherald.com

Why are local investors a critical piece of South Florida’s entrepreneurship community? Look no further than what AGP Miami is doing to help fill a funding gap.

AGP, a South Florida network of angel investors, closed on its latest investment last week: Animusoft. The Miami-based startup, which built a software platform for the drone industry called ALIVE under founder and CEO Daniel Rodriguez, has raised $1 million in funding, of which about half was raised from AGP members.

Now with nearly 100 members, AGP focuses on investing in South Florida companies, many of whom have made significant traction through bootstrapping, such as Animusoft. At a time when access to capital continues to be a challenge for South Florida entrepreneurs, AGP, originally funded by the Knight Foundation and now self-sustaining, is one of the locally based networks that has been doubling down on its mission to address the funding gap and expanding its funding activity.

Raul Moas (c) (2)In the past quarter, AGP Miami invested $1.25 million into local, early-stage companies, said Raul Moas, managing director of the network. In addition to Animusoft, recent fundings include Home61, Nearpod, Gramercy, Birch and Eventplicity.

AGP recently added Melissa Krinzman, managing partner of Krillion Ventures, Mark Kingdon, founder of Quixotic Ventures, and Tigre Wenrich, CEO of the LAB Miami who heads up LABVentures, to its board of directors. “All three of them are exceptional individuals – that was a big win for us,” Moas said. They join Nico Berardi, AGP’s former managing director, Juan Pablo Cappello and Marco Giberti.

AGP’s staff is also growing. Rebecca Danta, a Miami native, returned to Miami this summer to be AGP’s venture associate, where she's heading up AGP’s dealflow management, Moas said. Most recently she worked for General Assembly in New York City.

Although South Florida deals will continue to be AGP’s primary focus, Danta will also be looking around Florida, including Gainesville, for potential deals.

“Miami is home and will continue to be home base ... but there are great deals around Florida, in particular Gainesville, and the same thing in Latin America,” Moas said. “We think that in the next 12 months, we will be positioned to start either establishing a presence in some of these markets or at the very least scouting them more actively.”

Feathr, Birch and Eventplicity are all AGP portfolio companies founded in Gainesville. “We have an opportunity to bring them into the fold of what is happening here,” Moas said. They plan to hire a scout there for the fall.

At a time when international startups are increasingly making Miami their corporate or U.S. base, AGP will also look more aggressively for companies in Latin America that members can get into early, and as the companies grow and if it makes sense for them, AGP could be their soft landing in Miami, Moas added. “We want to be there to support them. The expertise is already here.”

[READ MORE: Hatching a tech future: South Florida startups are gaining strength]

Since 2014, AGP has invested in 24 companies and invested $7.2 million, Moas said. That’s up from $4.6 million a year ago, when AGP had about 80 members.

AGP screens hundreds of deals to find companies that could be a good fit for members. Then a screening committee further selects companies that will be invited to pitch to the full membership. AGP members decide individually whether to invest in a startup.

To be sure, AGP is not the only local funder that has been expanding activity – for instance Krillion Ventures and New World Angels have invested in a number of local companies in the last couple of years, and others such as Las Olas Venture Capital are beginning to take off. At a time when venture capital still lags in Florida, AGP and other local funders are providing critical seed and Series A capital.

Animusoft will be using the new funding to build out marketing, sales and business development efforts as well as augment engineering staff with additional data scientists, Rodriguez said. 

Five large architecture, engineering and construction firms are now piloting ALIVE, an operating system for drones, on job sites. Animusoft is also partnering with seven drone manufacturers, which will be packaging its software with their drones. “We are in active conversations with maritime cargo companies, logistics companies, law enforcement and farmers for other applications of drones powered by the ALIVE platform,” Rodriguez said.

As it expands, including a presence in the California Bay Area, Rodriguez says he plans to keep engineering, product and research efforts in Miami. “I am a Miami native, and plan to keep a solid footing here in South Florida. This is my home.”

For Animusoft and other portfolio companies, local investors provide critical capital to grow their early-stage ventures.

July 22, 2017

Pitch Perfect: How I landed my product on Walmart shelves

By Angela Horevitz

WinnerAnyone who has spent time baking knows the heartbreak that ensues when you arrive at your destination only to find your beautiful baked goods have been ruined in transit.

After being a victim of this one too many times, I created Bakers Sto N Go, a food storage container with adjustable trays that helps cooks stack and transport baked goods safely.

The idea came to me during a quiet meditation one day. ‘How could something so simple not exist,’ I wondered.

I had always wanted to be an inventor, so my husband told me to go for it. I spent the next 12 months working tirelessly until my product was perfect.

I made countless dozens of cookies, cakes, muffins and brownies, using every store-bought mix available to ensure the dimensions were right.

I eventually went to a mold maker, created a prototype, and in January 2007 attended my first trade show with the finished product.

Bakers Sto N Go was an immediate hit! Over the next 10 years, I sold my product in stores, online and in catalogs.

Earlier this year, I saw a promotion about a “Made In America” product search on Walmart’s website. I completed an online application, then waited. On the morning of May 26, I logged into to my computer and saw an email that said “Congratulations! You’re on your way to Walmart.”

A month later, I traveled to Walmart’s headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. I was intimidated by the idea of pitching the world’s largest retailer, but the people at Walmart went out of their way to be helpful. 

The next morning, more than 700 entrepreneurs attended a meeting with company executives. The room was electric. One guest, Mr. Bassett from Bassett Furniture, delivered an incredible speech about the importance of Made in America products. He was an inspiration to us all. 

After the group session came the breakout pitch meetings. Mine consisted of 6 people, from buyers to specialty employees.

My presentation was detailed. I explained why my product was a good fit for Walmart, and how it will benefit shoppers. We talked numbers and inventory.

They complimented me for doing my homework, especially the fact that I visited a Walmart store and showed pictures of where my product should be displayed. I wanted this account, and I was determined to make that clear. 

After 30 minutes, my buyer pulled out a green slip that read, “Congratulations. You’re in Walmart.” My eyes grew as big as oranges – I was so happy!

I left the room, we shot a quick video, and soon it was time for me to catch my midnight flight back to South Florida. The next morning, I got to work preparing for Bakers Sto N Go to debut on Walmart shelves. I wasn’t wasting any time.

I’m still pinching myself. The whole experience was like a dream. I came away inspired by my peers and proud to be a “Made in America” entrepreneur. 

Sometimes a simple idea takes you down a winding road. The past three months have been a whirlwind for my family, and I cherish the day when I’ll walk into Walmart only to find Bakers Sto N Go on the shelf.

Angela Horevitz is the founder of Bakers Sto N Go of Fort Lauderdale, www.bakersstongo.com

July 21, 2017

Babson College plans to launch Miami campus for graduate programs

Kerry

By Nancy Dahlberg / ndahlberg@miamiherald.com

Babson College plans to announce Monday that it is expanding to Miami, where it will begin offering some of its top-ranked graduate programs in the fall of 2018.

Babson’s newest hub, which will be located at the Cambridge Innovation Center at 1951 NW 7th Ave., will build on its base of 1,300 area alumni, the institution’s fourth largest alumni group, and a growing relationship in Miami’s entrepreneurship community. Miami will be Babson’s third location outside its main campus in Wellesley, Mass. It also has campuses in Boston and San Francisco.

The Miami expansion is part of Babson President Kerry Healey’s global growth strategy.

“We think Miami is a wonderful place geographically for us to be. It helps us cover the country in an important way but also it allows us to be where the entrepreneurs are,” said Healey (pictured above), noting that Miami ranked No. 1 for startup activity in the 2017 Kauffman Index report.

The graduate programs have been approved by the State of Florida and will include one of Babson’s premier degrees, its Blended Learning MBA, which combines online and face-to-face instruction, Healey said. That graduate program is ranked No. 5 in the nation and No. 1 for average alumni earnings by the Financial Times.

In the hot field of big data, a Master of Science in Business Analytics will be offered, she said. Other planned courses include a self-paced certificate program in advanced management, whose credits can be applied to a future Babson degree.

Miami offers a rich diversity of public and private graduate business programs, including those at the University of Miami, Florida International University, Nova Southeastern University, Barry University and Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, which opened a Coral Gables campus about a decade ago.

Babson, which has been ranked No. 1 for entrepreneurship education by the Princeton Review and U.S. News and World Report for more than 20 years, is no stranger to Miami. Babson created the curriculum for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program, which opened a program at Miami Dade College in 2014. That local program, which helps entrepreneurs grow their businesses, has graduated more than 300 entrepreneurs.

Babson’s WIN Lab, an accelerator for women-led startups, opened a chapter in Miami in 2016. The program’s second cohort will be starting in the fall.

“When we had the opportunity through the Knight Foundation to bring WIN Lab to Miami in 2016, we did it with the view of seeing if this was the right place to bring our graduate programs as well,” Healey said. “Our experience has been extraordinary.”

Miami is also a hub for family businesses, and the 98-year-old Babson’s emphasis on family business is a differentiator, Healey said. “One of the founding interests of Babson College was as support for family businesses and today nearly half of our students come from business families still,” she said. “Every generation of a family business needs an entrepreneur. Family businesses are founded by entrepreneurs but they are also kept alive by entrepreneurs.”

Babson will rent classroom space at Cambridge Innovation Center Miami, an entrepreneurial co-working center that opened in the University of Miami Life Science and Technology Park building last year. Students will also have access to CIC’s conference rooms, cafe and events. Babson will announce the new programs at CIC Miami at 10 a.m. Monday.

“We from the CIC side have had a tremendous experience hosting the WIN Lab and we all know that Miami is starting to get on the radar of interesting institutions and stakeholders,” said Natalia Martinez-Kalinina, general manager of CIC Miami. “We are working with Babson to facilitate how best to support their mission and vision.”

Martinez-Kalinina said CIC Miami has a number of collaborations with the University of Miami and will soon be opening up shared wet labs spaces to researchers and startups at UM and later other universities. CIC also hosts a series about the future of various industries with university experts and has been including local universities in its “soft landing” program for newly arrived international entrepreneurs, she said.

Babson is accepting applications for the Miami programs. More information is available on www.babson.edu/miami.

Nancy Dahlberg: 305-376-3595, @ndahlberg