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Singles aren't supposed to have work/life balance

       I've often heard single people complain that there's an assumption they have no life outside of work. Now, here comes a politician to fuel the flame.

      In video obtained by CNN, Rendell was discussing Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano -- President-elect Barack Obama's choice to lead the Homeland Security Department -- and said she has excellent qualifications for the job since she "has no family."
      "Janet's perfect for that job. Because for that job, you have to have no life. Janet has no family. Perfect. She can devote, literally, 19-20 hours a day to it," said Rendell, whose comments were picked up by the open mike.

   Of course, Rendell tried to backpedal when he realized what happened. "What I meant is that Janet is a person who works 24/7, just like me."

    CNN's Campbell Brown caught wind of Rendell's comments and took him to task. (see video below) Brown thinks it's fascinating that Rendell highlighted Napolitano single status as her big qualification for the job. She asks, "If a man had been Obama's choice would having a family have been a issue? Brown also says, "As a woman, it's hard not to wonder if we're counted out because we have a family or we are in our child-bearing years.'' Brown also questions whether a person who is childless and single is expected to work holidays, weekends more burdensome shifts.

     Do you think that there's an assumption that if someone doesn't have a family, they have no life outside of work? Are there stereotypes that prevent working mothers from landing certain jobs or work to the advantage or disadvantage of single, childless men or women?

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female reader

Gee what's new? When I was single, I was always expected to not want time off around holidays because I didn't have family. One year I was asked to give up an approved vacation over Christmas because another worker who had a family was having problems with day care. I said that I was unable because of travel arrangements and took off the time.

Until more women get into political office, the male mentality will always rear it's ugly head when it comes to women in the work place. Why do you think the FMLA is still geared the way it is. The men in office who worked the bill have stay at home wifes and they don't have to worry about missing any time from the office.

female working college student

I agree with the other commenter. Singles are expected to give up vacations, or work extra hours all the time. It happens everywhere. People think that because you're single you obviously have no plans for the holidays or vacations, even if you do have other family that you want to spend time with getting the time off is worse than pulling teeth.

female working college student

I agree with the other commenter. Singles are expected to give up vacations, or work extra hours all the time. It happens everywhere. People think that because you're single you obviously have no plans for the holidays or vacations, even if you do have other family that you want to spend time with getting the time off is worse than pulling teeth.

jessica

I agree. While I've never experienced anything first hand, I've felt the implied assumption. Whether or not we have kids, other relatives, or friends that we want to spend time with is irrelevant. If I just want to have the time to go home and sit in front of the TV, it's my business. Everyone's commitments outside the office should have no bearing on expectation of workload, etc.

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