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How to sharpen your people skills

Last week I sat among other anxious parents at my daughter's college orientation. When the president of the university addressed us, telling us he was about to reveal the key to success in college and life, the reporter in me kicked in, eager scribble down notes on this crucial piece of advice.

And then, he said something so simple, I put my notepad down and just nodded my head in agreement. He told us the key to success is "people skills." In today's workplace, there usually is complaining, gossiping, and griping about anyone with authority who lacks the know-how to inspire, manage and get along with others.  After a few decades in the workforce most of us discover that its take people skills, rather than expertise, to be a successful leader. 

Today, my guest blogger is Corali Lopez-Castro is a shareholder at Kozyak Tropin & Throckmorton, who concentrates her practice on bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters. Lopez Castro recently attended an event that emphasized the importance of people skills for women who want to get ahead. Here's her take on the topic:

 

Cori LC 2

I recently attended an event hosted by Lean In Miami, a local group of professional women founded by Stonegate Bank’s Erin Knight that is committed to empowering women to lean in to their ambitions and potential for success.

 

The keynote speaker at this event was Marlene Green. She is a leadership coach, author and two-time Emmy nominee with an impressive track record having worked with Fortune 500 companies and executives.

 

Ms. Green’s discussion topic, “The Art of Attraction – Communicating in a way that inspires and attracts others in the business community,” focused on how we should lean in to our careers by mastering our interpersonal skills.

 

The event was a perfect reminder that being career driven is not only about your technical expertise, but also about nurturing the human element of business, such as the way we communicate with others, and how this impacts our relationships and ultimately the bottom line.

 

From being present and engaged in a conversation, to being open minded and aware of your habitual ways and how others perceive you, the key is creating an everlasting connection with people. This means building relationships by remembering a person’s names when you meet them, establishing commonalities and creating value for others.

 

According to writer Darren Dahl of Inc.com, “relationships are the fuel that feeds the success of your business.” This follows Ms. Green’s mantra about mastering the art of attraction. Those who are positive, radiate enthusiasm about their profession, and offer support to their peers are creating value for themselves and those around them, which is a driving force to building and fostering relationships.

 

Since hearing Marlene speak, I’ve been more conscious of my actions when meeting new people, especially trying to remember their names and repeating it at the close of our conversation. The key is being aware of the situation, and I am definitely playing a more active role in communicating with others as a result.

As we juggle the many tasks that encompass being a working professional, we sometimes need to take a moment and gather perspective on “big picture” thinking about becoming a magnet for new business or expanding existing relationships and networks. After all, there is always room for improvement.

I encourage people to look deeper at the human side of business and the importance of enhancing these skills to be a better leader. A professional’s level of success is dependent on becoming an attractive asset for new business opportunities. 

 

 

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