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Lying to the boss about family obligations

Liar

 

A friend of mine who held a high position in an entertainment conglomerate told me that one afternoon, she lied to her boss about where she was going. She was going to her daughter's dance class. She had missed every class since her daughter enrolled. But she told her boss she was going to a business meeting. When she got to the dance class, she couldn't believe what she saw -- a top executive at her company who was there to watch his daughter. She begged him not to say a word to anyone and he seemed shocked that she would be worried about her job enough to hide her whereabouts.

I completely understood why she did it.

Working Mother Magazine reported today that some working parents (23 percent) admit to bending the truth to their bosses in order to meet family obligations.  

The Modern Family Index, sponsored by Bright Horizons Family Solutions, reveals that 48 percent of parents are afraid their family commitments and obligations could put their jobs in jeopardy. And 39 percent believe family responsibilities could prevent them from receiving raises. Many working parents also think that tending to family duties may prevent them from being considered in key projects (22 percent) and excluded from important meetings (19 percent). 

After giving birth for the second time, I asked for flexibility in my schedule. I remember feeling almost immediately that Iwas viewed in a new light and no longer included in brainstorming meetings about bigger projects.  

This new study found more than half of participants would think twice about asking their boss for reduced hours, working remotely or placing boundaries on responding to calls or emails. No wonder work life balance is a huge concern!

In spite of efforts in this country to promote and offer family-friendly workplace policies, many working parents still hesitate to tell employers that they need to tend to family responsibilities—and even fear job loss, according to the study.

Parents, what do you think about lying to the boss about family obligations? Is it necessary in some working environments? Do you think most bosses understand family commitments or as a country, are we not there yet?

 

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