February 28, 2017

Tim Tebow Follows His Passion and You Can Too

 

 

Former Florida Gators Quarterback Tim Tebow has lots of fans. He also has lots of haters. 

But Tebow doesn't let the haters get in the way of following his passion. Tebow, who didn't really find the success he wanted in the NFL, has now turned to baseball.

Tebow's detractors say he will never make it as a professional athlete. But Tebow doesn't listen. He continues on.

This morning, Tim Tebow  did an interview on Good Morning America and said the start of his spring training debut at the New York Mets training facility in Port St. Lucie, Florida, “feels great.” 

Here's what he told Good Morning America:

“Honestly it’s kind of a dream come true being out here with the Mets organization, a bunch of awesome guys, getting the chance to play a game I love,” Tebow, 29, said on “Good Morning America.” “It was just so fun putting on a uniform yesterday, going to warmups, in the stretch line, getting back into the routine, being part of the team and competing -- it was a blast. I’m having a lot of fun.”

Tebow's passion for following his dreams is admirable. Whether or not he makes it as a professional baseball player, he knows he gave his dream his all. Wow, what a role model for the rest of us who cower from "going for it" because we're afraid what people might say or because we are afraid to fail!

On Good Morning America, Tebow acknowledged that critics are still skeptical of his football-turned-baseball player path, but he said he’s “focusing on the love and not the doubt” that lies ahead.

“Obviously you have people on both sides,” said Tebow. “You’ll have people that are out here supporting that are great, and then you’ll also have people that want to bring you down. For me, this is something that I’m doing for the love of it. The love of the game, the love of pursuing passions, the love of being able to live a dream every single day."

So, what if you were able to live your dream every single day? What if you were able to turn something you love doing into a job that pays? Would you be able to get past the haters and doubters?

If you want more fulfillment from your job, or have a passion you want to follow, here are 5 steps to move you forward:

  1. Start the discovery process (research)
  2. Talk to people who have successfully taken risks
  3. Don't make money your primary consideration (any job can pay off with creativity)
  4. Network to learn who can help you
  5. Make a plan

 

Personally, I'm rooting for Tebow. While the haters hate, he's happier than most of them.

 

 

 

February 21, 2017

Don't let it end with Valentine's Day! How to fit romance into your work life balance

 

 

Romance

 

As we look back at Valentine's Day through our rearview mirror,  I feel a little glum. The roses are now on sale. The chocolate filled hearts are half price. And the tips on how to add romance into my life are no longer flowing into my inbox.

Yet, I want romance all year long. That’s not an easy task when most American workers find their work and home lives are blending together and work life balance is harder than ever to achieve.  Even after putting in a full day of work, the typical chaos is underway at my home. I am scrambling to come up with an easy dinner, my husband’s cell phone is buzzing with work emergencies and our son needs to be shuttled to and from school for his team practices every night.

That doesn’t exactly set the tone for romance.

I look to Kathryn Sansone for inspiration. Kathryn, a mother of 10, wrote a book called Woman First, Family Always: Real-life Wisdom from a Mother of Ten.

Years ago, I met Kathryn in person and she told me: ``Jim and I always carve out time for just the two of us. It's not always easy, but we don't waste time trying to figure out if we deserve it.''  Kathryn told me she and her husband make coffee breaks their ''alone time.'' At least once a week, after the younger kids go to bed, they slip out for coffee and give each other their undivided attention.

Late night coffee breaks? That actually sounds kinds of romantic.

If Kathryn can make alone time with ten kids in her home, I can too. And, so can you.

Recently, my husband and I went to a Friday night happy hour. We hadn’t been to happy hour in a long time. We drank fruity cocktails, and laughed about all the silly things that happened that week. Spending time together in a fun setting without interruptions felt so wonderful.

Lately, my husband and I have been taking walks together after dinner for about 10 to 15 minutes. We leave our phones at home. Those 10 minutes have become my favorite time of the day. 

Years ago, a love coach told me that everyone should make five to 10 minutes a day to give their spouse or significant other their undivided attention. That doesn’t seem like a lot of time, but most of us don’t do it.

Making time for intimacy requires turning off the TV or putting down your iPad, facing your partner and saying, "What would you like to talk about?" or “Tell me something good about your day.” Giving your partner your 100 percent attention will make him or her feel loved and important to you. That usually is how romance starts -- and how it lasts.

February 20, 2017

The New Ways Working Women Are Defining Success

What is success? 

If you asked a room of 100 people, it's likely each would have a different answer. And, they should.

For most of us, success is living our life with purpose, knowing what are dreams are, and figuring out how to break through the inevitable inner and outer resistance we will hit along our path to achieve them, says Mina Shah, who considers her success speaking on stage and motivating others.

Over the weekend, Mina, and a dozen other speakers at the 2017 Office Depot Foundation Women's Symposium, motivated more than 1,000 women to define success in new ways. 

Sign

There is nothing more energizing than being in a large ballroom, filled with energetic women who want to build awesome businesses, reach bigger heights at the companies they work for, or find new career paths that excite them. When I walked into the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach on Friday for the Office Depot Foundation Women Symposium that' what greeted me.

One of the most important messages Mina offered was not to be hindered by our fears or by naysayers, and stop short of our personal definition of success. "Most people work hard enough to feel the pain, but not enough to get the benefit of the reward," she said. 

A new definition of success...someone who breaks through doubt.

"No matter how accomplished you are or how much personal work you have done, you'll experience occasional doubt...and that doubt could mean the difference between success and failure," said Karen Pfeffer, co-founder of Fire Power Seminars. Pfeffer said success is pushing past doubt, busting through barriers and moving forward with determination, focused on what you want. She entered the male-dominated field of banking and became the first woman president of the Florida Bank Marketing Association. She now has a successful company that puts on empowerment seminars and does breakthrough coaching. 

However, if you think success is only about making money in the for profit business world, think again. Almost any business idea you come up with can be turned into a non profit, and there is a lot of start up capital available for non profits such as grants and foundation money and charitable giving of real estate. Speaker Sherry Watson, CEO of The Power of Purpose, a nonprofit consulting firm, gave an inspirational look into how women are earning good incomes while building nonprofits that better the world. "It's about taking our entrepreneur ways and bringing that forward, bringing solutions." Watson said with a nonprofit you can start a company, and change the world. The steps to building a non profit are on Waston's website: The Power of Purpose. She also suggested www.NonprofitWebclass.com.

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How else are women redefining success?

There are making the right connections, not in the old way, but in a new way.

Kavita Sahai of BIGplans, said early in her career, she saw the power of networking in action when she befriended an administrative assistant, who later persuaded management to give her a job at a private equity firm. "You are one conversation away from achieving your dreams," she said. "Have more conversations."

To achieve the success most of us want, when we have those conversations, we need to be able to fill in the blank: "I'm your go-to girl for ______ " Once we know what we need and what we can offer, success is in our grasp, Kavita said.

                                                   Kavita

Now, if there's a woman who has defined success in an intriguing way, it's Vernice Armour, America's first African American female combat pilot, who calls herself "FlyGirl"

Armour went from beat comp in her city, to a combat pilot who served two tours overseas in Iraq. She now is a motivational speaker, pulling in a six-figure salary through her keynotes, group coaching, seminars and executive retreats. Her big message: Who needs a runway? Take off from where you are."

Often, women wait waiting for the right moment, the right circumstances to make their move. Instead, "just move into action from wherever you are," she advises. "In order to be successful, you gotta get gutsy." When Armour realized she had a voice and something to say, she took a workshop on public speaking, and moved into action. Clearly, she is good at what she does. She had the whole room of women cheering, laughing and interacting. 

 

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One of the most impressive women who has defined success her way, despite obstacles, is Mary Wong, president of the Office Depot Foundation. Mary suffers from health issues, but pushes forward to accomplish amazing things for the foundation, which gives children tools to succeed in school, among other contributions. Wong sent a clear message at this year's Women's Symposium that today's working women are defining success in new ways and she encourages women everywhere to be A Difference Maker (#diffmkrwomen).

 

 

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Honored to be in the company of Mary Wong (and her dog) at the 2017 Office Depot Women's Symposium

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 25, 2017

Inspiring Scenes from the Women's March

Like thousands of other women, men and children, I attended a Women's March on Saturday. The one I attended was in Miami. I went because I believe in democracy and because I write about work and family. I went because I believe in paid leave and sick days so all parents can keep their jobs and have families.

I have watched as many women's organization have worked tirelessly to advance the causes that will make the lives better of working mothers and their families. I want to see that continue. I want us to march forward as a nation toward improving the lives of the people who are working hard to support their families.

According to Time Magazine, millions of people participated in the women's marches that took place across the country and around the world on Saturday. Exactly how many millions is difficult to pin down since large crowds are notoriously tough to count, but a pair of researchers place the figure at at least 3.3 million just in the U.S., based on hundreds of news reports and Facebook data.

Regardless of how many people attended women's marches, by far, what inspired me most was young girls who marched and the signs they carried. I am completely convinced our nation is in good hands in the future after seeing the passion and purpose that young people expressed through their presence, their signs and their positive energy. 

Here are a very reasons I am inspired by the next generation: (These photos are from the Miami Women's March and Rally)

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These photos are from the D.C. March via Working Mother Magazine. Click here for more of Working Mother's photos.

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So, are you inspired too? Do you agree that the future of women and families is in good hands?

 

January 13, 2017

Why working mothers need to pay attention to what's going on in D.C.

                                                Mom

 

As a mother, I'm concerned. As a women, I'm concerned. As someone who writes about work and family issues, I'm concerned.

There's a lot at stake in the next four years. I need to pay attention. So do you.

In recent years, we have seen progress in benefits offered to working mothers: More companies began offering paid maternity (and paternity) leave or extended the time off. More cities and states passed paid leave and paid sick days laws.  More women and families gained access to healthcare. The issue of equal pay became front of mind. Lastly, minimum wage increased in 21 states, a crucial boost for families living paycheck to paycheck.

Yes, we've seen progress. But don't get too excited yet. Changes are afoot that threaten some of the advances that make a difference in the lives of working mothers. We need to ensure all working mothers receive crucial workplace protections and medical benefits.

Here's what we need to watch and weigh in on:

1. Repeal of Obamacare and its replacement. Republicans in Congress want to take away healthcare from tens of millions of people without offering a comprehensive, transparent or vetted replacement plan.

Debra Ness, president, National Partnership for Women & Families, made this statement: Senate Republicans demonstrated blatant disregard for women’s health and economic security by voting against amendments designed to prevent insurance companies from charging women higher premiums than men and denying coverage to women simply because of their gender; ensure access to affordable birth control; and preserve Medicaid expansion and the Medicare program as we know it.  As the budget moves on to the U.S. House of Representatives, on behalf of the millions who stand to lose health care, we demand that House leadership stop playing politics with our health care, especially women’s health, including reproductive health, and instead make it a priority." 

It's tempting to think our voices don't matter on this issue that affects millions of people. Working mothers can't afford to ignore access to medical coverage that saves lives and prevents bankruptcies. 

2. Paid sick leave.  People are more likely to go to work sick or send a sick child to school if they don’t have access to paid sick days. Ivanka Trump appears to be a proponent of some type of legislation around this issue.  The Healthy Families Act, floating around Capitol Hill,  is an important piece of legislation that could make a difference for many families by putting a national paid sick days standard in place; The National Partnership for Women & Families wants us to show our support with a message: "Pass a bill that gives every worker in America the opportunity to earn seven days of paid sick leave. It's the right thing to do." Here's the link to get your voice heard. 

3. Equal pay. There won’t be a female commander-in-chief this year, but women made big gains in other areas of government and business. Eleven of the top nation’s courts will have a majority of justices who are women in 2017. As Working Mother notes: Women still make 79 cents for every dollar a man earns, but several executive actions signed by President Barack Obama will help increase transparency in pay—a crucial step toward eliminating the wage gap. Now, all of Obama's executive actions are at risk. We need to keep a close eye on this important step in the right direction for working women and working moms, and fight in our own workplaces for more transparency, too. Here's the link to encourage members of Congress to support fair pay.

4. Workplace Fairness. You should not get fired or lose a promotion because you’re pregnant. And you should never have to experience sexual harassment at work. It’s not right, but discrimination is common in the 21st century workplace. There are efforts going on to quash the nomination of Trump appointees who have a disregard for equality. I urge you to support those efforts.

5. Women's March on Washington. On January 21, millions of women plan to march on Washington to protect our rights, our safety, our families, and our democracy, and to say NO to hate. You can keep up with developments @womensmarch or #womensmarch. Also, MomsRising does a great job of keeping the public up on key issues of importance to moms.

 

March

What else we need to watch:

  • Millennials today earn 20 percent less than their boomer parents at the same age. With student loan debt and high childcare costs, young families are moving in with parents. Great article in USA today about this trend. 

 

This is an important year to keep up with the news and let your voice be heard! We can all play a part in keeping the momentum going in a positive direction! 

December 20, 2016

How busy people keep up their holiday stamina

Last night I picked my daughter up from the airport and found myself yawning the entire ride home. I wanted to hear about her semester at college, but I was just too darn tired to really pay attention. For the last few weeks, I have tried extra hard to keep a work life balance as I juggle work deadlines with holiday/charity events and shopping. 

I love this time of year, but it takes stamina to stay happy, healthy and energized during the holiday season.

Sleep. For me, that requires a good night sleep. I have been trying to power down an hour earlier than usual at night. I also make my to do lists for the next day before I leave my desk each evening. It has helped me have a clear head so I can go to bed without worrying about everything I need to do the next day.

Exercise. There are other ways too keep your stamina up. Recently, I spoke with Randall Vitale, regional Unknown-1
vice president for Hoffman's Chocolates. It's a super busy time at Hoffman's, which has a factory in Palm Beach County and 10 stores in the Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach area. Vitale has stepped up communication with his 10 store managers during its busiest month of the year, huddling daily and encouraging managers to make customer interactions impactful and correct order mistakes quickly. “We want customers to come back next year and the year after.”

To stay productive and enjoy the holidays, Vitale, finds pockets of time for stamina-building. He uses odd hours when his seven-month-old wakes up to lift weights, do yoga stretches or stroll the baby around the neighborhood. “Ramping up exercise not only helps with stamina, it also counteracts the extra eating at holiday parties,” he says.

Focus. Some people keep their stamina high by focusing on a reward. Jessi Berrin, a Baptist Health South Florida director of government and community relations, has been to a slew of holiday events and is still going strong. "Even though this is the end of crazy busy year, I continue to push myself knowing I am taking time off next week. It helps knowing the reward is just down the road."

Listen. I have noticed when I listen to my favorite music, whether it's Jingle Bell Rock or the latest from Fifth Harmony it puts a pep in my step.  Research from the University of Maryland shows that hearing music you love can relax blood vessels and increase blood flow. That not only calms you down but can put you in a great mood to get more done.

 

Plan. Another way to keep your stamina up is to energize yourself for new year. Julia Aquino-Serrano, Unknown president of the National Association of Business Owners Broward chapter and CEO of business consultancy All Systems Grow of Coral Springs, has set aside four hours  to write a work and life plan for 2017. (Writing it down is the key, she says)  Earlier in December, Aquino-Serrano launched a second company, Tees for Humanity. With two businesses, her 2017 plan will include how she will grow her companies and deal with work life balance. “I will consciously make choices and not carry around guilt.”

Yes, the holiday can be stressful, But they can be fun, too. Stop obsessing over doing it all. The world is not going to end if your kitchen is cluttered or your inbox is overflowing  Focus your energy on enjoying the people in your life and you are sure to finish out 2016 strong!

 

 

December 12, 2016

What to give your boss for the holidays? Do you even need to give a gift?

 

                                           Gift

 

 

Many people struggle with whether to get their boss  a holiday gift. I have been one of those people who has contemplated this dilemma many times. I don't want to look like a kiss up, but I also want to show a good boss that he or she makes my work life enjoyable.

I try to go with gifts that are a little personal, but not too personal. For many years, I had a manager I considered a friend. He and I spoke regularly about our kids, our jobs and our goals. He helped me to do the best work I was capable of by being supportive of work life balance. When it came time for the holidays, I knew he liked to cook and eat gourmet dishes so I gave him food-related gifts – unique cookbooks, homemade desserts, fun cooking tools. The gifts were always accompanied by a note.

When gift giving to a boss, I think the note is the important part. Some managers feel pressure from above -- all the time -- and appreciate someone on their staff acknowledging that they are good at their job. I've given small gifts like a fun mug with a handwritten short note like: "Happy Holidays! Thanks for being a great boss!" If you aren’t thrilled with your boss, you can tone it down and try to find one thing about him or her that you appreciate and acknowledge it in your holiday note.

Another option is to pool with your colleagues to get a group gift. The group present should be inexpensive but thoughtful. The easiest gifts are consumable or usable --  a food basket or tickets to a show or sporting event. If you have a particularly bad boss,  you still might consider contributing to the group gift to avoid things getting awkward and appear a team player.

Gifts to a boss or co-worker are not mandatory. I think the key is looking closely at the culture of your workplace and reading your boss. A reasonable manager would never penalize someone, even subtly, for not giving him or her a gift at the holidays. On the other hand, you might not have a reasonable manager. Contemplate your own situation, and proceed accordingly. (But know that etiquette is on your side if you choose not to give a gift.)

Also, be careful about getting creative. One year, a manager I know received  giant Buddha statue from his assistant. I guess she was trying to help him feel more zen.  She insisted her boss display it. “Now I’m stuck with it seeing it every day and it irritates me,” the manager told me. “My advice is don’t give your boss anything he has to display. If you miss the mark, a nice thing turns into resentment.”

 When he told me this, I asked him whether he thought his assistant even needed to get him a gift at all. His answer was "it's always nice to feel appreciated." However, I have asked other managers the same question and they have told me they don't want a gift and they don't plan to give their staff gifts.

What are your thoughts on giving a boss a gift? Has it ever made you uncomfortable to give or receive a gift at work? Is it more uncomfortable not to give a gift?

December 02, 2016

What you need to do at the office holiday party

 

                               Holiday party

 

This weekend I am attending my husband's holiday office party. By now, I have been to enough holiday parties to know there are unwritten rules. So, I know to tread carefully. I also know that office holiday parties are important -- maybe more so than most people realize. If you are thinking of skipping your holiday party, don't do it. The boss knows exactly who was there and who wasn't.

Now, let's say you do go and you decide to make the most of your company's generosity. Do so cautiously. One year, my husband's co-worker made a big pig of himself by ordering two meals -- a giant steak and a full size lobster. I guess he figured it was the company's dime, but he came across as someone who would run an expense account up just for the heck of it. Not a good impression to leave on the boss.

Holiday office parties can be landmines for embarrassing behavior,  or they can be huge opportunities to impress the boss and strengthen relationships with co-workers. Here are a few tips from many years of navigating the office holiday party.

1. Eat something before you go. Take a nibble on something small but sufficient to soak up any alcohol you ingest quickly. (It's a good idea to pace yourself on the alcohol, too) I have been on the wrong side of this one so I speak from experience.

2. Dress appropriately. We all know what that means --  no sleazy outfits, no ratty shoes, no stained clothing. Ask ahead what people are wearing so you don't show up too overdressed or too casual. 

3. Mingle. It's easy to hang out with the people you already know well but this is great chance to get to know co-workers from other departments or managers who might be helpful in the future. Introduce yourself so you don't spend the whole night talking to someone who has no idea of your name.

4. Make conversation with your boss' significant other. You may not realize it, but significant others have a huge influence on your manager's perception of you. Making the extra effort to converse with his or her other half can help your career. When my husband considers raises, I can't tell you how many times I have pleaded someone's case, so again, I speak from experience.

5. Arrive timely. We joke around in South Florida that people are on "Miami time" but at a holiday party arriving late deprives you of the chance to hang out early in the night when people are most talkative and drinks are just beginning to flow. Even if you don't really want to attend, showing up on time and scooting out shortly after should be enough for people to remember you were there.

6. Be receptive. If someone kisses you on the check, don't stand there like a cold fish. If someone shakes your hand, look him or her in the eye and welcome the introduction. If someone pinches your tush or hugs you too long, that's another story. Let them know right away that you find it offensive. Using humor is a good way to do that.

7. Show appreciation. Before I leave, I always say thank you to the person who planned the event, and the person who paid for it.  Someone put in a great deal of effort hoping you would have a good time and someone spent money to make it happen. Even if you didn't have the best night of your life, not only is saying thank you the nice thing to do, but it also makes you stand out because most employees don't.  

Monster.com has some tips as well, including some advice for the party planner. 

My favorite part of the holiday party is seeing my colleagues dressed up and in a good mood. How about you -- do you love office holiday parties, or dread them?

 

 

November 09, 2016

Post Election: What to Say To Your Daughter

I woke up this morning thinking about what I wanted to say to my daughter about the future. At first, it felt like an overwhelming task. I saw a clip on television of a woman at the Hillary Clinton reception. The woman looked up and said to the camera: "The glass ceiling is there and it's fully in tact."

Clearly, that's not the message I want my teenage daughter to take away from this election.

I also do not want her to take away the message that degrading women is okay or that walking around in shirts that say "Trump that Bitch" is acceptable behavior. I want to my daughter to believe that there is a level of respect for women in the United States and that young women today have every opportunity to achieve whatever they set out to do. I want young women to believe that their husbands, fathers, brothers and male friends are okay with women having power in the workplace and in the political arena.

My daughter watched the campaign results in her sorority house, surrounded by young women who had voted for their first time. This morning, I told my daughter I was proud of each and every young woman who voted. As a child, my mother hammered in the message that women worked hard to get the right to vote and I must never let them down by failing to exercise my right. It's the same message I have repeated to my daughter.

As a journalist, I have been writing about women in business for two decades. I have seen firsthand how difficult some of their journeys have been to achieve success in their fields. But I see progress.

This morning, I encouraged my daughter to be proud of how far women have come and to realize that having a female presidential candidate is an accomplishment. I told her that young women today need to educate themselves about politics, business and social issues. They need to know who and what they are voting for and why. They need to demand respect at work and in the world and refuse to accept anything less.

I am encouraged by the reaction of a young woman at Wesley College who said this morning: "Today, we put on our pantsuits and fight on!"

Yes, young women, we need you to fight on! 

Over the years, I have seen that the success of women is the success of families. I have seen that when women break the glass ceilings in their fields, they achieve feats that better all of mankind. 

There are two things that Hillary Clinton said in her concession speech that I wanted my daughter to hear: 

 

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"To all the women, and especially the young women, who put their faith in this campaign and in me: I want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion. Now, I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but someday someone will — and hopefully sooner than we might think right now."

Then, Clinton went on to say something equally as encouraging to the next generation of female leaders:

"To all of the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams."

So parents, talk to your daughters today about what the future holds for them. Give them the encouragement to dream big and to understand that achieving high goals may come with obstacles but navigating them is part of life.  Show them examples of women who are admirable and encourage them to address disrespect. Most important, let them know that there is a lot of work to be done and I'm hopeful that there are many young women who are smart, self confident and enthusiastic enough to make positive change for years to come. 

 

November 07, 2016

Good news for workers, employee perks are back!

During the recession, companies pulled back on perks as they cut costs. But now hiring has resumed, salaries are rising, and the fancy perks are back and more creative than ever. 

That's good news for those of us trying harder than ever to strike a work life balance! The even better news is companies are trying harder to find the perks their workers really want. After all, what good is a perk if it doesn't improve our work lives or personal lives, right? 

A growing number of employers are introducing enticements such as cooking classes, student loan assistance, spot bonuses, standing desks, paid leave and free snacks or meals. Other popular benefits that we are seeing more often are onsite meditation, yoga, mindfulness — programs that help workers de-stress.

Recent research from Glassdoor.com, a California-based jobs and recruiting website, found that more than half (57 percent) of people said benefits and perks are among their top considerations when considering accepting a job, and that four in five workers say they would prefer additional benefits over a pay raise.
 
At minimum, most employers offer the basics — medical, dental, vacation, 401k. But more companies are adding to those offerings.  “When employers offer perks, they get something back: They get happier, more focused, more productive employees,” says Andrea Lubell, whose company Innergy Meditation is about to open a Miami Beach studio but has been going to workplaces and doing onsite meditation with employees as a perk.
 
According to a SHRM survey, the three top benefits employees say are important to their job satisfaction are paid time off, healthcare/medical benefits, and flexibility to balance life and work issues. 
 
With a little digging, I found some interesting offerings. If your employer doesn't offer them, it may be worth asking. 

POPULAR EMPLOYEE PERKS IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Food:

Free food

Some businesses provide regular catered lunches. Other companies offer snack rooms, juice bars and visits from food trucks. At Brightstar Credit Union headquartered in Tamarac, employees are provided free healthy snack options including granola bars, smoothies/protein shakes and salads. O’Connell and Goldberg in Hollywood has created an ice cream bar and even holds ice-cream meetings twice a week.

Discount sign

Discounts: About 20 percent of workers say employee discounts are what they value: discounts on cruises when working for a cruise line, dining or shopping when working at certain restaurants or retailers, or on services when working for dentists. Fort Lauderdale cosmetics dentist April Patterson at Dr. Patty’s Dental Boutique and Spa gives her employees a free whitening every three years and free teeth cleaning twice a year, along with discounts for family members.

Happy hour

Happy hours and social events: From hosting a team-building bowling night to taking employees on weekend cruises, employers have caught on that work outings are a fun way for employees to bond while building morale. Future Energy Solutions in Fort Lauderdale does regular team outings to local trendy play spots.

 

Pingpong

Play time: Pool tables and ping-pong tables may seem like distractions, but some companies have recognized their usefulness as creativity boosters. Ultimate Software in Weston has an indoor basketball court for employees to shoot hoops. Fort Lauderdale staffing company Hayes Locum has said its ping-pong table is one of the most used things in the office.

 

Meditation

Stress relief: Some local employers are bringing in masseuses to the office to work out people’s kinks; others are offering yoga classes and guided meditation. At International Creative Designs in Fort Lauderdale, employees can bring their pets to work — a guilt and stress reliever.

 

Contests  Run

Contests and reward programs: Some companies are rewarding outstanding workers with the opportunity to leave early or take a day off. At NextEra Energy in South Florida, all 10,000 employees can use PowerBucks to recognize and reward other colleagues. The PowerBucks are used to enter monthly raffles and win prizes.


For my full Miami Herald article on this topic, click here.