November 09, 2016

Post Election: What to Say To Your Daughter

I woke up this morning thinking about what I wanted to say to my daughter about the future. At first, it felt like an overwhelming task. I saw a clip on television of a woman at the Hillary Clinton reception. The woman looked up and said to the camera: "The glass ceiling is there and it's fully in tact."

Clearly, that's not the message I want my teenage daughter to take away from this election.

I also do not want her to take away the message that degrading women is okay or that walking around in shirts that say "Trump that Bitch" is acceptable behavior. I want to my daughter to believe that there is a level of respect for women in the United States and that young women today have every opportunity to achieve whatever they set out to do. I want young women to believe that their husbands, fathers, brothers and male friends are okay with women having power in the workplace and in the political arena.

My daughter watched the campaign results in her sorority house, surrounded by young women who had voted for their first time. This morning, I told my daughter I was proud of each and every young woman who voted. As a child, my mother hammered in the message that women worked hard to get the right to vote and I must never let them down by failing to exercise my right. It's the same message I have repeated to my daughter.

As a journalist, I have been writing about women in business for two decades. I have seen firsthand how difficult some of their journeys have been to achieve success in their fields. But I see progress.

This morning, I encouraged my daughter to be proud of how far women have come and to realize that having a female presidential candidate is an accomplishment. I told her that young women today need to educate themselves about politics, business and social issues. They need to know who and what they are voting for and why. They need to demand respect at work and in the world and refuse to accept anything less.

I am encouraged by the reaction of a young woman at Wesley College who said this morning: "Today, we put on our pantsuits and fight on!"

Yes, young women, we need you to fight on! 

Over the years, I have seen that the success of women is the success of families. I have seen that when women break the glass ceilings in their fields, they achieve feats that better all of mankind. 

There are two things that Hillary Clinton said in her concession speech that I wanted my daughter to hear: 

 

Hil

"To all the women, and especially the young women, who put their faith in this campaign and in me: I want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion. Now, I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but someday someone will — and hopefully sooner than we might think right now."

Then, Clinton went on to say something equally as encouraging to the next generation of female leaders:

"To all of the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams."

So parents, talk to your daughters today about what the future holds for them. Give them the encouragement to dream big and to understand that achieving high goals may come with obstacles but navigating them is part of life.  Show them examples of women who are admirable and encourage them to address disrespect. Most important, let them know that there is a lot of work to be done and I'm hopeful that there are many young women who are smart, self confident and enthusiastic enough to make positive change for years to come. 

 

November 07, 2016

Good news for workers, employee perks are back!

During the recession, companies pulled back on perks as they cut costs. But now hiring has resumed, salaries are rising, and the fancy perks are back and more creative than ever. 

That's good news for those of us trying harder than ever to strike a work life balance! The even better news is companies are trying harder to find the perks their workers really want. After all, what good is a perk if it doesn't improve our work lives or personal lives, right? 

A growing number of employers are introducing enticements such as cooking classes, student loan assistance, spot bonuses, standing desks, paid leave and free snacks or meals. Other popular benefits that we are seeing more often are onsite meditation, yoga, mindfulness — programs that help workers de-stress.

Recent research from Glassdoor.com, a California-based jobs and recruiting website, found that more than half (57 percent) of people said benefits and perks are among their top considerations when considering accepting a job, and that four in five workers say they would prefer additional benefits over a pay raise.
 
At minimum, most employers offer the basics — medical, dental, vacation, 401k. But more companies are adding to those offerings.  “When employers offer perks, they get something back: They get happier, more focused, more productive employees,” says Andrea Lubell, whose company Innergy Meditation is about to open a Miami Beach studio but has been going to workplaces and doing onsite meditation with employees as a perk.
 
According to a SHRM survey, the three top benefits employees say are important to their job satisfaction are paid time off, healthcare/medical benefits, and flexibility to balance life and work issues. 
 
With a little digging, I found some interesting offerings. If your employer doesn't offer them, it may be worth asking. 

POPULAR EMPLOYEE PERKS IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Food:

Free food

Some businesses provide regular catered lunches. Other companies offer snack rooms, juice bars and visits from food trucks. At Brightstar Credit Union headquartered in Tamarac, employees are provided free healthy snack options including granola bars, smoothies/protein shakes and salads. O’Connell and Goldberg in Hollywood has created an ice cream bar and even holds ice-cream meetings twice a week.

Discount sign

Discounts: About 20 percent of workers say employee discounts are what they value: discounts on cruises when working for a cruise line, dining or shopping when working at certain restaurants or retailers, or on services when working for dentists. Fort Lauderdale cosmetics dentist April Patterson at Dr. Patty’s Dental Boutique and Spa gives her employees a free whitening every three years and free teeth cleaning twice a year, along with discounts for family members.

Happy hour

Happy hours and social events: From hosting a team-building bowling night to taking employees on weekend cruises, employers have caught on that work outings are a fun way for employees to bond while building morale. Future Energy Solutions in Fort Lauderdale does regular team outings to local trendy play spots.

 

Pingpong

Play time: Pool tables and ping-pong tables may seem like distractions, but some companies have recognized their usefulness as creativity boosters. Ultimate Software in Weston has an indoor basketball court for employees to shoot hoops. Fort Lauderdale staffing company Hayes Locum has said its ping-pong table is one of the most used things in the office.

 

Meditation

Stress relief: Some local employers are bringing in masseuses to the office to work out people’s kinks; others are offering yoga classes and guided meditation. At International Creative Designs in Fort Lauderdale, employees can bring their pets to work — a guilt and stress reliever.

 

Contests  Run

Contests and reward programs: Some companies are rewarding outstanding workers with the opportunity to leave early or take a day off. At NextEra Energy in South Florida, all 10,000 employees can use PowerBucks to recognize and reward other colleagues. The PowerBucks are used to enter monthly raffles and win prizes.


For my full Miami Herald article on this topic, click here. 
 
 
 
 

November 03, 2016

How to scale back at work

 

 

Work-life-button

 

One evening I checked my inbox around 10 p.m. and saw a brand new work-related email from my friend Susan. It could have waited to the next day so I wondered why she was working so late. When I questioned her about it the next day, she told me she regularly works that late and admitted to being a workaholic.

Flash forward and Susan is now a new mother who is struggling with work life balance.

“As a former workaholic, it’s so hard to scale back,” she confessed. “Before, I had that crutch that I could always stay late to finish something.”

Lots of women and men face the challenge of changing their work habits after becoming parents. Others need to change their work habits when they become caregivers. This week, my friend Lisa called to tell me her parents need more supervision. Her mother has been falling lately. She has decided to scale back at work to be there for her aging parents, but worries she doesn't know how. 

So how exactly do you go from full throttle to half speed? How do you scale back at work? 

Have a plan. When you plan your work day, don't include the evening hours. Know the top three things you need to accomplish before you leave the office and get them done.

Use time wisely. Drive or commute time is ideal for making calls before you arrive home. The goal is to walk in your door ready to focus on your loved ones at home.

Delegate. Most of us want total control over every aspect of our jobs. Sometimes, when we scale back we just have to be okay handing things off.

Raise your hand cautiously. Resist raising your hand or agreeing to take on anything your boss or team needs. You need to be much more intentional about what you agree to handle.

Manage Expectations.  You will need to be realistic about what you can accomplish when you work at a different pace. Instead of agreeing to a tight deadline, give yourself more time, and convey that new timeline to your boss or clients.

Reprioritize. Most people find juggling the demands of work and the responsibilities of family is an ongoing challenge, but the first step is recognizing your priorities have changed and you must change, too. It's easy to feel uncomfortable no longer being the go-to person for every big decision. But you can still be influential and have a home life if you take on the high visibility tasks.

Scaling back and finding the right work life balance is tricky, but it’s also doable!

October 31, 2016

How working parents can make the most of Halloween

                                           Halloween

 

 

For years, I scrambled to get home from work in time to take my children trick or treating. I planned my whole day so that as a working parent, I wouldn't get caught on deadline and tied up at work. Not only is Halloween one of my favorite days -- and nights-- but I loved the fun of the holiday and being with my kids and neighbors. One Halloween, I had to tell a good source I just couldn't interview him because he called as I was trying to get out the door to go home. Yes, Halloween can put work life balance to the test.

Make no mistake, whatever sacrifice you need to make at work to be home at a decent time to be with your children tonight will be well worth it! Now, two of my children are in college and one is in high school. I am grateful for every moment I spent trick or treating with my kids. 

Clearly, I am in a different phase of my life, but I'm still making the most of Halloween and I urge you to make the most of the holiday, too. Tonight, my parents will come over and sit in our driveway and pass out candy.  Instead of watching the thrill on my children's faces when someone tosses Hershey bars in their bags, I look forward to the delight on my mother's face when a small ghost or tiny witch thanks her for the treat she puts in his or her bag.

I have reached the age in which my friends no longer have their parents, or are managing issues around their parents’ declining health. While I long for those nights of trick or treating with little ones, I am wise enough to appreciate my time with my parents.

I realize that holidays like Halloween are about treats and fun but they are also about finding new opportunities to bond with family, friends, neighbors and even co-workers. I encourage everyone to view Halloween as the happy day it can be at work and at home and dress up, indulge in sweets or find a way to enjoy a break from routine with the people in your life. 

Make a deal with yourself not to sweat the small stuff today. If you kid sheds part of his costume along the way, no biggie. If you turn off the lights and a kid still rings your doorbell, be okay with it. If your co-worker thinks his costume is the greatest in all the land, let him gloat. If your mother in law feeds your kid a Halloween cupcake after he has eaten a ton of candy, let it slide. 

I encourage you to put whatever stress you have in your life aside for today. Years in the future, you will realize it was well worth it.

Happy Halloween!

 

 

 

October 24, 2016

How Working Mothers Can Return to Work

I was at Starbuck's a few weeks ago and ran into a fellow journalist who I hadn't seen in many years. She was with her teenage daughter and struck up a conversation with me about how she wants to return to work after taking a decade off to be home with her children.

My first thought was...that's not going to be easy. In almost every profession, including journalism, technology has changed how we do our jobs. If my friend wants to apply for a job, she will be competing for jobs against people who have embraced that change, particularly young reporters. So what's the answer? Will my friend be able to return to work?

A few days later, I heard Gloria Samayoa speak at an event and mention that her digital marketing agency, SapientNitro, is piloting a return to work program in its Miami office. The program aimed at transitioning experienced professionals back into the workforce was successful in other offices and the agency thought Miami would be a good place to try it, too. The two conversations led to a Miami Herald column on "Returnships" which are similar to internships but for experienced workers who go back to work on a trial basis and receive one-on-one mentoring during that time period. The goal is to turn the experience into a permanent, fulltime position. 

After interviewing two mothers who participated in these "returnship"programs, I'm convinced this is a great option for anyone looking to transition back into the workforce with a gap in his or her résumé. 

You can click here for the full Miami Herald article. Here is a link to a list compiled by iRelaunch of companies that offer career re-entry programs. 

Below are some great tips from women who have returned to work.

 

Jax and Mom-1

Ellen Kalis and her son Jax. Ellen, took four years off and now works at SapientNitro

 

TIPS FROM FOUR FEMALE ‘CAREER-RETURNERS’

1. Carol Fishman Cohen of Boston returned to work at Bain Capital after 11 years out of the full-time workforce. She eventually founded iRelaunch.com, a firm that connects employers with returning professionals. Her advice: “Get clarity around what want to do now at this point in your life. Once you know where you want to work, get to know the company you are applying to really well.” She also advises taking courses or refreshing skills before applying for full-time jobs or return-to-work positions. “Get into the mindset that you are open to training and the feeling you can do it.”

2. Amy Brenner Schaecter of Weston returned to work after more than a decade at home. First she went to a PR firm, then in-house at a multinational company. Her advice: “When you get back to work, make friends with a smart millennial. The synergy is awesome.”

3. Ellen Kalis participated in SapientNitro’s Returns Program after a four-year hiatus. Her advice: “You have to have confidence in your skills. If you go in and show your value right away, companies will see that. Even though I needed more ramp-up time than a millennial or someone who came from that position, hopefully I am adding value somewhere else.” Kalis is now a full-time public relations lead for SapientNitro, Canada and the Midwest. Ellen published an awesome blog post about her experience.

4. When Carol Hansen returned to return to work in New York after 10 years as a stay-at-home mom, the industry she had left —marketing/advertising — was transformed. Hansen’s transition through SapientNitro’s return-to-work program had its challenges: It was her first time working with millennials, balancing work and family, and digital storytelling. Her advice: “Jump in and raise your hand to help with any project. In doing so, talk to people in all areas of the company,” she said. “Even if I didn’t make it past the returnship period, I knew I needed to learn more and make myself relevant. I saw areas where I was strong and got a reading on areas where I wasn’t.” Hansen is now a full-time senior user experience designer at SapientNitro in New York.

 

 

 

October 11, 2016

Career Advice from The Girl on the Train's Justin Theroux

I saw Girl On The Train this weekend and thought the acting was fabulous -- particularly Emily Blunt and Justin Theroux. However, what turned me into a big Justin Theroux fan was the career advice he inadvertently gave on The Today Show. 

If you wait patiently through the interview, the advice comes in the last minute before the cut to a commercial. Matt Lauer told Justin that he has heard from directors that Justin could be an even bigger star but the reason he isn't comes by design. 

Justin replys: "I make my decisions (for what roles I choose) based on what's going to make me happy, not on what's going to advance me to the next level. I just always do what I really want to do." 

It's an important message for people who think they want to advance in their careers, only to find when they get to the top of the ladder, they really aren't fulfilled. 

Take on the roles that will make you happy, not the ones you think are going to turn you into a star...great advice Justin, thanks!

 

October 05, 2016

Storm is coming: Must I go to work?

As South Florida prepares for the storm coming our way, I thought posting this article I wrote in 2008 for The Miami Herald would be helpful!

Storm's here: must I go to work?

Each hurricane season workers have to juggle their jobs with preparing for a storm. But many have three big questions about work: Do I have to go? Will I be paid? What do I do with my kids? The Miami Herald spoke to a few local labor lawyers to get their input.

Q: I need to miss work to prepare for the hurricane . Can I be fired? Will I be paid?

A: Yes, you can be fired. Florida is an employment-at-will state, which means that an employee can legally be terminated for any reason other than discrimination or actions like whistle blowing.

Getting paid will depend on your job classification. Hourly workers are paid only for time worked, so employers aren't legally obligated to pay you anything if you're not at work. If you are a salaried employee (and don't get overtime), an employer can force you to use your vacation time.

Q: My boss says I have to work during the storm. Can I be fired if I refuse?

A: Yes. Again, because Florida is an employment-at-will state. Still, while several lawyers say they can't think of a law that makes it illegal to force employers to work during a storm, they often advise common sense on the part of employers during a hurricane . A good rule of thumb is if the people in charge of the business don't want to be out on the roads, no employee should have to be.

Employers should post a hurricane work policy so everyone gets treated the same. If your employer isn't doing that, ask for a policy. Mark Cheskin, a lawyer who represents employers, said he would approach the boss by asking what the policy is to make clear everyone understands the rules.

"That puts the employer on the spot to make sure it's a clear understanding for everyone, " he said.

Q: Can I be forced to use vacation days or personal days during a hurricane , even if the business is closed?

A: Yes, if you are a salaried employee (and don't get overtime) and your place of business is closed because of the hurricane for less than a week. According to the new Department of Labor opinion, employers can ask workers to use vacation time, which can include personal days, even if the workplace is closed. The only good news: According to the new opinion, if you have run out of vacation time, or won't have enough left to make up the time missed, then your employee has to pay you for the entire week.

Q: School is closed, most day-care centers are closed, and I don't have a place to put my kids. Can I bring them with me to work?

A: Your boss isn't obligated to provide room for your children. In fact, labor lawyer Cheskin thinks he would tell his clients that's not a great idea.

"I'd probably advise my clients not to do it, we don't want to have that kind of liability," said Cheskin, who heads the Florida labor and employment law practice for Hogan & Hartson. But, he says, that's "completely up to the employer".

Q: My workplace is closed before the storm and says it will reopen afterward. Will I be paid?

A: Again, it depends on whether you are a hourly or salaried worker. Companies aren't obligated to pay hourly workers, although after last year's storms, several did. In most cases, employers are obligated to pay salaried workers a full week's salary, even if they are closed, but they can make you use your vacation or personal days.

Many labor lawyers, even those who represent employers, say that companies that follow the letter of the law risk seriously damaging employee morale.

While it often depends on the size of the company, if an employer can afford to pay the workers, it's probably best to do so, says Epstein Becker & Green's Michael Casey.

"It's more difficult for small employers to pay people who don't work a couple of days. Larger companies are better positioned to absorb those extra costs," he said, but added: "Most employers want to treat people fairly and help them. This would be a good time to do that."

Hurricane Matthew and Work Life Balance

As many of you head to work together with the storm in mind, I know your family safety, preparations, and work life issues are weighing on your mind. TV anchors are telling parents to pick their children up from child care and school as early as possible today. I hope employers will be understanding.,
 
Here is a column I wrote in 2012 when we were facing a storm that I thought might be of interest:
 
 
 
The Miami Herald

Storms, school closings provide ultimate workplace flexibility test

The Miami Herald

BY CINDY KRISCHER GOODMAN

As Floridians set out frantically buying storm supplies this past weekend, one announcement created almost as much panic as the threat of high winds: public schools would close on Monday.


For working parents, the news triggered a mad scramble for child-care solutions, particularly when most businesses chose to stay open. Trapped, some parents were forced to take a vacation or sick day, others showed up at work with kids in tow, while the desperate begged relatives or babysitters to step in at the last minute.


Across the country, hundreds of companies boast of being family-friendly workplaces. But to me, days like Monday speak volumes about the reality of that label. For parents, it’s not only how our employers react to our need for accommodation during weather related events; it’s also how well they’ve planned for it.

As news of Tropical Storm Isaac circulated, top managers at C3/CustomerContactChannels in Plantation held meetings to prepare for various scenarios. Supervisors were told to
allow employees to work from home when possible and
encourage staff to download documents to their laptop hard drives to be able to work on them even without an Internet connection. Even more, the company, which operates call centers around the world, began brainstorming ways that hourly workers could make up time off for weather-related office closures.

On Monday, when downpours flooded the streets, Alicia Laszewski, vice president of communications at C3, asked to work from home. Pregnant, Laszewski says she felt uncomfortable making the commute to the office and had two young children out of school. She got the green light to work from home. “It builds loyalty that they have respect for me and my health and my family,” Laszewski said.

At some offices such as Boardroom Communications in Plantation and Soffer Health Institute in Aventura, the emergency child-care plans for staff include allowing
parents to bring kids with them to work. Emira Soffer
works as a business manager for her brother at Soffer
Health Institute in Aventura. On Monday, she brought her
two daughters, 7 and 9, with her, putting them to use inserting promotional paperwork into informational folders. “It’s not typical that we bring kids to the office, but it’s a warm environment and there’s an understanding that it’s OK if we’re in a pinch.”

With storm season in full swing and weather-related shutdowns nationwide more common, brace for an even greater need for good planning. Nationwide, parents are discovering school districts are closing more often, hesitant to take chances with student safety and fearful of lawsuits. At the same time, the recession has led businesses to cut back on employee benefits that help with disaster preparedness. Only 32 percent of organizations now allow employees to bring their children to work in a child-care emergency, while 17 percent offer a child-care referral service and 3 percent provide access to backup child care, according to a Society for Human Resource Management survey of 550 employers.

Working mother Aida Segui-Luciano says she accepts that planning for last-minute school closings is her responsibility. Segui-Luciano, works in retail services at Tropical Financial Credit Union in Hollywood. Knowing she can’t do her job from home or bring kids to the bank, she saves a few days in her paid-time off bank as a precaution for storm season. On Monday, at home with her 13- and 12-year-old children and no power, Segui-Luciano said no one at her workplace questioned her decision to dip into her PTO bank of time off: “My manager is understanding that I have a family and have to take care of my family. I said I was taking the day off and he said, not a problem, see you tomorrow.”

Of course, some parents don’t plan and don’t have accommodations at work. Backed against a wall, they drop their kids off unsupervised at libraries, malls and movie theaters that are open for the day. Others leave their kids home alone. Felicia Jones, a security guard for a residential community in North Dade, gets paid by the hour and faced the tough choice Monday of losing a day’s income or leaving her pre-teen home alone. Going forward, Jones says she will make a backup plan to leave her daughter with friends.

If the home alone option is your back-up plan, prepare your children for how to handle emergencies and potential danger, parenting experts say. New to Florida, Amy McGraw, vice president of marketing at Tropical Financial Credit Union, says she overcame her storm panic and left her 16-year-old daughter at home on Monday to do her homework. But McGraw says she checked in often throughout the day, something family-friendly employers should expect and
encourage their working parents to do.
Of course, working from home and keeping young kids entertained takes planning, too. On Monday, Janice Lusky Greenspan, a Miami public relationships account executive, pulled out a special bin with activities to keep her boys busy and prevent the need to lock herself in the bathroom to make a work-related phone call. The bin held items such as crossword puzzles, model airplane kits, comic books and dollar-store toys for her two sons, 6 and 9. “As a mom, if you don’t prepare, you’re screwed. We have eight more weeks of hurricane season with a good chance of this happening again.”

Remote workers say it’s days like Monday when the flexibility of their jobs pay off. A South Florida sales representative for Microsoft, Stephanie Kleiner says she had the technology in place and a boss with the right mindset to cope with the last-minute school closings. Kleiner says her manager quickly granted her request to stay off the roads and at home with her kids. “Mobile workers are always thinking ahead,” she says. “We’re used to managing and making due. We looked at it as a great day to catch up with desk work.”

September 30, 2016

How to discuss work problems at home

Talkingwork
Lately, my husband has been frustrated at work. His team members aren't carrying their weight and he feels like he is at the office much later than he should be. For the last week, he's been coming home in an awful mood.

As a spouse, one of the big challenges in a relationship is letting your partner blow off steam and slowing down long enough to listen. The temptation for me is to jump right in with an opinion or let my mind wander off to think about the 10 things I need to get done instead of focusing on what he is saying. Sometimes I want to shout: "Enough work talk already!"

 

Yet, I have noticed that how I react when he wants to vent can be crucial to our relationship and to the harmony of our household.  Most of us have seen how household dynamics shift with each member's mood. For my husband, knowing he can offload without being attacked or dismissed helps him return to his office in a better frame of mind and improves our household harmony.

I've heard people say, "I never bring my work problems home." When them say that, I think that it is unhealthy. Physically we may spend the day in two places but in our minds we don't. We think of work at home and personal issues at work. It's just how we balance our lives today.  So it's natural to want to work through workplace aggravation with someone who loves you and has your best interest at heart.

By listening, really listening, I can gauge what my husband needs from me, or even ask him directly. When I do, I often can help him come up with ideas for how a problem at work can be resolved, or get him see the situation in a different light or just offer empathy. When I have a problem at work, I want the same support from my husband. Even though he doesn't work in the same field, he understands workplace dynamics and worker behavior and has offered me some great advice over the years -- or sometimes, he just listens. Just yesterday, I was at an event in which a CEO told the audience he relies on his wife to help him navigate his workplace conflicts and it's the reason he has been able to survive in the top position at his company.

The trick is learning how to support our significant other while setting some boundaries that limit how much we allow workplace irritations to loom over our home life. At some point, switching off is important, too. 

What are your thoughts on bringing work stress home? Do you find allowing your spouse to discuss work problems at home is a good thing for your home life or does it lead to arguments and stress on the family? How important is it for you to be able to vent to your significant other?

September 27, 2016

Is it okay to interrupt women?

Last night, I watch Donald Trump continuously interrupt Hillary. Indeed, by the time the debate was over, Trump had interrupted Clinton 51 times — whereas Clinton had interrupted Trump just 17 times, according to the fact checkers. You could say it is Trump's personality to speak his mind and that he interrupted the men, too, during the Republican debates. 

What was different in last night's debate were the Twitter comments that ensued, such as this one:

 

Shout out to all the women having stress flashbacks to being yelled over in important meetings

 

Stacy Marie was just one of the women took to Twitter to complain about how often she is interrupted by men, particularly in the business setting. Decades of research show that women get interrupted more often by both men and women, and that women are often given less credit, or even penalized, for being outspoken.

Last night, these dynamics were on display on a worldwide stage and the reaction was fascinating.

Whether it's in the boardroom, the conference room or in front of TV viewers, interruptions are not only rude, they prevent a speaker from making his or her point, and moving on. At the end of the day, not being heard affects our efficiency, effectiveness and our work life balance.

Men likely are more comfortable interrupting women because they have been raised from day one to believe what they have to say is important. However, women interrupt each other, too. In a blog post on Vox, it was noted that tech startup CEO and linguist Kieran Snyder designed an experiment that found men in tech industry meetings interrupted twice as often as women did, and that men were three times as likely to interrupt women as they were to interrupt other men. When women did interrupt, they interrupted other women 87 percent of the time.

Post debate, I've heard little criticism of Trump for interrupting as much as he did. In fact, Vox points out that Hillary is more likely to be criticized for the way she responded to Trump's interruptions.

 

I appreciated this tweet:

A President should always interrupt someone by yelling "wrong, wrong" in a microphone.

 

Don't be naive to think such "wrong, wrong" behavior doesn't go on in workplaces. It does and it needs to stop.

In fact, recently workplace columnist  Rex Hupkke wrote about mansplaining and described the term this way:

"The all-too-frequent instances when a man explains something to a female co-worker in a condescending manner. It often begins with the man interrupting the woman — "Actually …" — or talking over her, all so he can explain something she already understands."

Rex even offered a solution to men:  Stop and think. Before you cut off a female colleague or launch into an explanation of something that needs no explanation, ask yourself: Am I about to mansplain?

I am sure Trump could care less about curbing his mansplaining or his interruptions. It's been an effective tool for him in business. But when our effectiveness and work life balance are at stake, women need to make men more aware of their behavior, whether or not it is intentional, and nudge them to change it.

Of course, let's not let ourselves off the hook either. We have just seen what interruptions look like and it isn't a pretty picture. Let's set the example for men and stop and think before we interrupt other women.

Everyone deserves to be heard. It's time to make that loud and clear.